Improving the Nashville bushings contact

NINFNM

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I have always thought that the Nashville system was superior from an engineering point of view compared to the ABR. Some will thought that it's ugly or that it doesn't transfer as good the vibrations.
I disagree with the first point, and second, partially, the other one.

The Nashville system has more treaded contact than the ABR. Their Studs/Bushing connection has more threads than the Wheel/Post of the ABR.

They also has a cleaner and better height adjustment, in the same line as the tailpiece was designed.

Not to mention the non rattling and more stable saddle system.

For me the weaker point was the wood contact, so I thought that the best of both worlds would be a Nashville system, but with the bottom part of the bushings resting directly onto the wood, so, I went for it.

First I got a couple of maple plugs with the same diameter as the bushing holes:
DSC_2953.JPG


After measuring the holes I cut them to a length such that the bushing made direct contact at their base with the maple (a hair longer in fact to ensure that):
DSC_2955.JPG


After hide glueing them and let them dry overnight, y put the bushings back in place.
I had to hammer them HARD, Not only it's a super tight fit, but the bushings are a bit nailed onto the new maple plugs:
DSC_2958.JPG


The finished job:
DSC_2960.JPG


My idea was to compare the mod with the same ol strings, but unfortunately I broke two while restringing, and then I had to replace them all, so the comparison is not fair.

Obviously now it sound much better, and also louder, but the fresh strings are the main responsable for that.
What I can notice is the neck vibrating more in my hand, but maybe is placebo.
Honestly I don't care about sustain, but if I place my hand behind the headstock, it keeps ringing and ringing long after strumming a chord.

I will play it these days and let it sit so I can have a better perspective.
At least the goblins in my head have shut their mouths.
 
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Jewel the Sapphire

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Thats pretty neat, glad you found success!

Ive had a design idea for a cross between the Nashville and ABR1 for awhile, but for now just putting a Nashville bridge on ABR1 posts seems to be the best of both worlds. Thought you might have been going in that direction when I saw the maple plugs. Bravo.
 

az2000

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You gave me an idea. Similar to your goal, I've read that tightening the tailpiece all the way down can increase sustain. It did. But, the angle (bridge to tailpiece) was so steep that the strings felt stiff. I further read that "tailwrapping" the strings (out the back of the tailpiece, over the top) makes the strings feel better (but can scratch your tailpiece). I did that. But, now they seem too "slinky."

I saw a Stewmac video where he used an "internal threaded socket plug" (I think it's called) threaded into the bushing. Then locked the tailpiece screws down onto that:


(Click for larger)

I found some (but black steel, not brass. You can find them with a pointed end, or flat.). But, couldn't get it to work because they were kind of loose in the bottom of the bushing. It would thread past the end of the bushing and fall into the bushing hole.

I've been planning to raise my tailpiece, find the a height where the "slinky'ness" feels right. Then use a washer (or two) to lock the tailpiece down to the bushing.

But, your post caused me to realize: I could plug the bottom of the hole like you did, and seat one of these socket screws against the wooden plug for better contact. (Probably can't tighten it without lifting the bushing out of the hole). They come in various lengths. So, instead of figuring out how many washers I need, I could use the closest length metal socket screw for the tailpiece height I want.

I wouldn't glue the wooden plug in my case. I might want to change the height of that so I could better fit the steel plug's height (within the bushing). Or, drill the center of the wooden plug a little to make space for the steel plug (but still be able to make firm contact with the bushing).

Hopefully that makes sense.
 

NINFNM

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Feels good not being the only one with goblins inside my head :laugh2:

Maybe for your purpose it would be useful the faber tone locker:
TLKIT-1.jpg

41AQY7RwDYL._SX466_.jpg


The tailpiece studs would rest onto the top of the bushing while keeping it in reasonable height for feel
 

NINFNM

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You gave me an idea. Similar to your goal...

Or maybe an easier solution would be, in case you had the new short style tailpiece bushings, swaping them for the historic longer ones, and then you would have enough room for placing your socket screws at the bottom of the bushing
 

NINFNM

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Yea, I would like to try a longer and steel made Nashville studs and bushings, but it seems that such thing doesn't exist
 

redking

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I have always thought that the Nashville system was superior from an engineering point of view compared to the ABR. Some will thought that it's ugly or that it doesn't transfer as good the vibrations.
I disagree with the first point, and second, partially, the other one.

The Nashville system has more treaded contact than the ABR. Their Studs/Bushing connection has more threads than the Wheel/Post of the ABR.

They also has a cleaner and better height adjustment, in the same line as the tailpiece was designed.

Not to mention the non rattling and more stable saddle system.

For me the weaker point was the wood contact, so I thought that the best of both worlds would be a Nashville system, but with the bottom part of the bushings resting directly onto the wood, so, I went for it.

First I got a couple of maple plugs with the same diameter as the bushing holes:
View attachment 353005

After measuring the holes I cut them to a length such that the bushing made direct contact at their base with the maple (a hair longer in fact to ensure that):
View attachment 353006

After hide glueing them and let them dry overnight, y put the bushings back in place.
I had to hammer them HARD, Not only it's a super tight fit, but the bushings are a bit nailed onto the new maple plugs:
View attachment 353007

The finished job:
View attachment 353008

My idea was to compare the mod with the same ol strings, but unfortunately I broke two while restringing, and then I had to replace them all, so the comparison is not fair.

Obviously now it sound much better, and also louder, but the fresh strings are the main responsable for that.
What I can notice is the neck vibrating more in my hand, but maybe is placebo.
Honestly I don't care about sustain, but if I place my hand behind the headstock, it keeps ringing and ringing long after strumming a chord.

I will play it these days and let it sit so I can have a better perspective.
At least the goblins in my head have shut their mouths.
That is a well-played Lester!
 

Subterfuge

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You gave me an idea. Similar to your goal, I've read that tightening the tailpiece all the way down can increase sustain. It did. But, the angle (bridge to tailpiece) was so steep that the strings felt stiff. I further read that "tailwrapping" the strings (out the back of the tailpiece, over the top) makes the strings feel better (but can scratch your tailpiece). I did that. But, now they seem too "slinky."

I saw a Stewmac video where he used an "internal threaded socket plug" (I think it's called) threaded into the bushing. Then locked the tailpiece screws down onto that:


(Click for larger)

I found some (but black steel, not brass. You can find them with a pointed end, or flat.). But, couldn't get it to work because they were kind of loose in the bottom of the bushing. It would thread past the end of the bushing and fall into the bushing hole.

I've been planning to raise my tailpiece, find the a height where the "slinky'ness" feels right. Then use a washer (or two) to lock the tailpiece down to the bushing.

But, your post caused me to realize: I could plug the bottom of the hole like you did, and seat one of these socket screws against the wooden plug for better contact. (Probably can't tighten it without lifting the bushing out of the hole). They come in various lengths. So, instead of figuring out how many washers I need, I could use the closest length metal socket screw for the tailpiece height I want.

I wouldn't glue the wooden plug in my case. I might want to change the height of that so I could better fit the steel plug's height (within the bushing). Or, drill the center of the wooden plug a little to make space for the steel plug (but still be able to make firm contact with the bushing).

Hopefully that makes sense.
technically, I believe it's referred to as a Set-Screw ...
 

NINFNM

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The more mass added, the more energy absorbed rather than transferred.
Pure physics. Not "mojo", not "NOS", not "tone", not "Youtuber/forum regular said".

You went and added some more mass.
O.K.

As to rattling, certain folks' intonation woes and so on, that's poor QA from Gibson and nothing more. Done right, an ABR functions just fine.
No one has to take my word for it, can think of a dozen or so monsters of guitar that sounded.. just fine :)

Not just more mass, but a tighter fit and more contact. Mass is the least important factor in this modification.
 

MiniB

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Ever since Gibson USA went with the cheaper Ping Works Nashville bridges and bushings, they're been rather sloppy in fit. I always replace them with original German Schaller units or Gotoh units, including the actual bushings in the wood and etc fit is considerably higher and more secure, less play.
 

Blues_Verne

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Not just more mass, but a tighter fit and more contact. Mass is the least important factor in this modification.
Here is my solution with ALL my tunamatic/stoptail guitars: no metal rattle bushings, tighter and ultimate direct contact to wood, less mass - more tone, sustain, dynamic response.
 

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