I'm not a conspiracy theorist...

Bill Hicklin

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Once upon a time, crime was fairly low. Back then, cops instinctively understood the "broken window principle" - and didn't enforce it with meaningless citations or pointless arrests, but a little bit of constructive correction (which generally got its point across). As (New York) police inspector Alexander Williams observed, “There is more law at the end of a policeman’s nightstick than in a decision of the Supreme Court.”
 

MikeyTheCat

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I truly hated being a cop. :noway:

It was nothing, if not a a "damned if you do and damned if you don't" kind of profession.

I served as such for eight years and some months before I found a way to get out of that profession altogether. I've heard a lot of coppers talking about how "it gets into your blood" and all this bullshit-- lots of them seem to think it's a really big deal to be a cop-- but to me it was just a shitty profession and not some glorious, sanctified mission at all.

Even though I really disliked the job, I still feel that the experience was valuable in a lot of different ways. But I'd never want to do it again, and if I could go back in time while still knowing what I know today, I sure as hell wouldn't ever have been a cop to begin with.

I might have made the best of it at the time, and those 8+ years of service actually kick in about 25% of my fiscal take as a pensioner, but damn man... it sucked! :laugh2:

The crazy thing is this: I served at such a time as when if somebody spit on me, threw water on me-- or whatever-- and I cold-cocked the asshole and carted his stupid ass off to jail, nobody would even wonder why.

I can't even imagine what it must be like to serve these days.

--R
When I took the test my dad sat me down and told me there were three kinds of guys on the job: guys like him for which it was a job (he did over 20 years), guys who liked to boss people around and then those who wanted to help people. He told me never to become a cop if I was doing it in the hope of helping people as those guys always became bitter.

Things have really changed since they took away the night stick.
 

penguinchit

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Time to thin the herd. There really are some people we don't need in society.
 

Roberteaux

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When I took the test my dad sat me down and told me there were three kinds of guys on the job: guys like him for which it was a job (he did over 20 years), guys who liked to boss people around and then those who wanted to help people. He told me never to become a cop if I was doing it in the hope of helping people as those guys always became bitter.
Your old man spoke a mouthful of truth to you, right there. :thumb:

I was of the coldly professional type-- never was dumb enough to be an altruist. Pearls before swine, and all that. I knew that most people are assholes by the time I was about 15.

My motives for becoming an L.E.O. were simply that I couldn't envision another job that wouldn't just flat bore the shit out of me. And so I went to college, got a degree in law enforcement, chiseled my way into the state's certification academy, and was subsequently picked up by the Volusia County Sheriff's Office almost immediately after that.

The first four years weren't so bad, because I was assigned to a unit that did little more than to serve arrest warrants and other enforceable writs of various sorts. I didn't really have to do much traditional police work (i.e. patrol, answering calls for service, investigations) in those years. Instead, my cohorts and I simply ran around and arrested people who had outstanding warrants. We also came in with CID when they had search and arrest warrants to serve. Other than that, however, all we did was backups for patrol units when the shit hit the fan somewhere.

But then I finally became bored shitless and so, stupidly, asked for a transfer to patrol. :facepalm:

Not a good idea for me. I don't actually have the sort of personality that a really good patrol officer should have-- and it didn't matter how professional my orientation was, either. Essentially, I'm not a fan of the bulk of humanity to begin with, and simply didn't have the patience or tolerance for bullshit that a great patrol officer almost always features.

Four years of it was enough for me. After that, I took advantage of the pilot's licenses I had earned to schmooze my way into a job with airport operations at Daytona International.

And I never looked back.

Things have really changed since they took away the night stick.
Nightsticks, slapjacks, blackjacks, and assorted conks are all better than the taser when it comes to getting people to chill-- especially groups of people who realize that your baton is not just a one-shot deal, the way a taser is.

There's just something about the prospect of being beaten by some bastard with a badge and a club that seems to install some modicum of sense in even the dullest of human beings.

Not all, of course-- but most. :thumb:

--R
 
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mrdannyboy

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Many times it’s been proven that the provocateurs especially the most violent ones are actually please themselves This happened in Canada I believe in Ottawa or Toronto when there I think it was a G 20 summit. It’s up and it’s awful other countries too
 




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