Ideal rate of twist (MLP firearms and shooting thread)

GunMonkeyINTL

Senior Member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
599
Reaction score
1,291
Yes, straight wall pistol doesn’t need lube. I was thinking ahead. Same with trimming straight wall pistol.
Not to be argumentative, but that’s not necessarily true. If you’re going to run a crimp die (tube fed mags and/or SHTF loads) you do want your cases all pretty close to the same length.

Most mouth-headspacing rounds are going to get shorter with use, so there’s not much you can do besides artificially accelerate the shortening process... or not worry about it. Rimmed “cowboy” cartridges will get longer in time, and seemingly inconsistently (in my experience), so trimming is advisable.
 

GunMonkeyINTL

Senior Member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
599
Reaction score
1,291

The scale is a little cheesy, but it does the job. I’ve used one like it for almost all my years of loading.
Your cheap Lee scale is actually bad-ass. The poise is fiddley, and using it requires some serious patience, but it’s stupid-accurate.

Lee calls it the “safety scale” because it’s so dead-nuts simple, with no dampening, that, if you properly zero it, and let it settle (which can take 30-60 seconds sometimes) it will ALWAYS read accurately.

I have three mechanical scales, and one is a coveted NJ-made RCBS-labeled Ohaus 10-10, but I still check it from time to time against the Lee Safety. It’s never wrong.

Get a charge of something like 4895 or Varget perfectly weighed and settled, and then drop a single additional granule in the pan. It’ll report back that you did that.
 

Gary

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
1,764
Reaction score
3,772
I have the Lee Anniversary kit and did buy a better scale. The Lee scale works well but I upgraded to a Lyman magnet dampened scale.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Who

Neffco

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2013
Messages
2,387
Reaction score
4,334
Not to be argumentative, but that’s not necessarily true. If you’re going to run a crimp die (tube fed mags and/or SHTF loads) you do want your cases all pretty close to the same length.

Most mouth-headspacing rounds are going to get shorter with use, so there’s not much you can do besides artificially accelerate the shortening process... or not worry about it. Rimmed “cowboy” cartridges will get longer in time, and seemingly inconsistently (in my experience), so trimming is advisable.
You came in late to the party. I had recommended them, then who said he reloaded thousands of straight wall pistol without, I was agreeing that you don’t NEED them to get started. We were just introducing JonC to the basics.
 

GunMonkeyINTL

Senior Member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
599
Reaction score
1,291
You came in late to the party. I had recommended them, then who said he reloaded thousands of straight wall pistol without, I was agreeing that you don’t NEED them to get started. We were just introducing JonC to the basics.
K
 

GunMonkeyINTL

Senior Member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
599
Reaction score
1,291
.45 ACP. I have a bunch of 9mm on hand, but only a few hundred in .45. Seems like the most cost effective one to start with too
Look into Berry’s plated bullets. Very good quality stuff at a great price. In fact, if you’re looking for defensive rounds, his plated JHP is essentially the same thing as a Speer Gold Dot, but at bargain-bin pricing.

This guy, righcheer. ‘Ats a soul-steelin boolit:
 

JonCanfield

Reality is over rated
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
7,764
Reaction score
23,399
We have a few other handguns too - .357, .38, .32, and .25 but they aren't seeing any use. They came from Kathy's dad when we moved them out of their place.
My 9mm and .45 are both Springfields
.357 is a 1963 S&W
.38 is a S&W with pearl handles - serial number dates it to 1911
.32 is a Colt M1903 with a 1913 serial number
.25 is a Filli Brescia
 

JonCanfield

Reality is over rated
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
7,764
Reaction score
23,399
I just priced out a Dillon progressive package, in .45 ACP.

I skipped non-essentials, like a bullet that, riser, low powder alarm.

With this package, you still need a scale and a primer flip tray ($10 at WalMart),
I’d also recommend a good light source to watch for power in the case when moving from powder drop to bullet seating.


That’s it. Ready to load.

Plus, you have YouTube. I had just the instruction manual and friends who made fun of my press.

If you go this route, let me know. I’m sure I have an extra scale around I can send you.
This looks like a nice setup. Might be more than Kathy would be happy to se me spend to get started, but something to think about for sure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Who

Roberteaux

Super Mod
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
28,490
Reaction score
138,276
Just for grins, I put in a bid on this
RCBS Supreme kit

Thoughts? My max bid is $250.
I'd hit it. :thumb:

When it comes to tumblers, I'd agree with Who when he said that you don't really need one. When I first began hand loading, I was so broke that I was using a Lee Loader kit and didn't even have a press. What a trip that was... you end up forcing cartridge cases into a sizing die with a soft face mallet, flare the case mouth and crimp in the same manner-- by beating the cartridge case into a die with a soft hammer-- and you also deprime using a mallet tap, and you'd be tapping a new primer into the primer pocket the same way (but gently!) You'd always expect to have one or two new primers while you were trying to seat the new primer. And you'd use the volumetric spoon that came with the kit to throw powder charges. God help you if you didn't have any of the powder type that was indicated on the enclosed instruction sheet, though!

This is the Lee Loader kit. Looks like it was probably designed by somebody like Fred Flintstone, and talk about a slow process?

But if you were usually broke like me, it *did* work. :thumb:





In those no-bucks years, I used to just dump my cases into a pot with some water, add a couple of drops of dish washing liquid, heat the water to very hot-- but not boiling-- and stir with a wooden stick or spoon or something. The result was funky-looking brass, but again: it worked.

I still have my first proper scale and trickler-- bought that sucker in 1977, and it's still in use:

20200329_174926.jpg

And I see that your kit includes one of these, along with a powder dispenser. So you're pretty much all set when it comes to that.

Now, a word about powder charges for straight-walled handgun cartridges, especially the .45 ACP. Basically, when it comes to charge weight consistency, "pretty close" is usually good enough with .45 ACP. One doesn't usually see much of a difference if one cartridge has .1 or .2 grains more powder in them than the next one-- and that's about the gross error one will usually see in the more common types of dispensers, except for while using a dispenser to throw extruded powder charges.

***************​

So for now, you can get alone without an extremely sophisticated dispenser if you need to save money, and can just go with one the RCBS Uniflow dispenser that is included with the kit you're bidding on.

***************​

As I indicated above, one powder type will be more consistent than others when charges are being throw using the type of dispenser included in the kit.

There are three basic types of powder: flake, spherical, and extruded. All of these terms pertain to the shape of the powder granules themselves. Of the three, spherical is the most consistent using a given powder dispenser, with flake powder being the next easiest powder type to work with. Extruded powder the most likely to throw inconsistent charge weights, again due to the shape of the granules of powder themselves... examples.

Looking at the shapes, it's pretty easy to figure out why this is so:


Spherical Powder vs. Extruded


Flake Powder vs Spherical

Because of the .45 ACP cartridge type you're interested in starting out with, the mass majority of powder types you'll be likely to encounter will be either flake or spherical. There are extruded types that are sometimes used to load handgun cartridges... but really, extruded powders are more commonly used by those who load for rifles.

If you're wondering about powder, I'd say this: look for either HP38 powder, which is one in the same as Winchester 231... literally the same. Same factory, same vat, same guy running the machine. :laugh2:

HP38 - Win 231 is a spherical (or "ball") powder, and it meters perfectly. Even with my low-rent Lee powder dispenser, it never throws a charge off by more than .1 grains... which is nothing, really, unless one is already loading to the max (a thing I never do).

Of course, there are probably at least 50 other powder types you can use with .45 ACP.


***************
Just a little left to say right now. Jon, I know this is a lot to take in all at once. But trust me: the guys in this thread will talk until we're blue in the face to help you out, and we wouldn't complain about it. :thumb:

But to continue:

The .45 ACP cartridge type is considered to be a "low pressure" type, meaning that the chamber pressure it develops will usually fall somewhere within 19-20 thousand PSI (or 16-17 thousand CUP, depending on how your manual likes to list stuff).

As such, you probably don't need a trimmer at all. In fact, with most straight-walled handgun cases (up to and including .44 Magnum IME) the case itself will fail (usually the neck cracks or primers are no longer secure in the primer pocket) before it lengthens so much as to go out of spec.

With bottle-neck rifle cartridges, one really does need a case trimmer, though. Those suckers "grow", or become longer in the neck, with surprising swiftness. Depending on the manufacturer, I've seen .223/5.56 cases lengthen by from .001" to .004" per loading. So depending on whether you go to loading for rifles or not, you may or may not want a case trimmer.

If you envision ever loading for rifle, just get a trimmer right now and be done with it.

I noticed that you'll also be needing a set of dies. If you purchase "carbide dies" you'll pay a small premium over stainless steel dies... but it's more than worth it because carbide is more slick and lasts a little longer. And yes: given enough time, you really *can* wear a die set out altogether!

As I said before: my dies range through Lee, and RCBS, and then my real specialty dies-- a neck sizing die and precision seating die-- are both from Redding. But these dies are quite critical and it was worth paying more for them. I don't think anybody *but* Redding does a precision seating die or not. But I'm sure somebody else does... :hmm:

No matter. What I've got is good enough. :thumb:

My final thing or three... :laugh2:

You'll probably want a vernier caliper. This thing comes in useful for measuring cartridge case length... though as Who and I have both already said, straight wall handgun cases don't tend to do much other than to keep shooting until they're spent, but seldom become longer and therefore difficult or impossible to chamber.

caliper.jpg


But the caliper is nice because it can help you to set up your bullet seating die (the thing that pushes the bullet into the case after you resize it, put a new primer in its ass and then load it with powder).

With the vernier caliper, you can measure Cartridge Over All Length... which you really do want to be able to do with any cartridge whatsoever, because there are minimums and maximums when it comes to that sort of thing.

You don't need a really expensive set of calipers to start with. The 15-buck special I posted above works just fine, and is definitely accurate enough for our uses. The only caution is that sometimes an el cheapo caliber will wear out before a more expensive item will.

But me? I always shoot for "cheap, but gets the job done". :laugh2:

Also: if you shoot anything bottle-necked, you want the calipers to measure cases... and a cartridge case gauge for the bottles, because sometimes just knowing the length of a casing isn't good enough. If you saw me talking about manufacturing .300 Blackout cases out of spent .223's, you might recall that not all of the cases I form actually come out in such a form as to be usable.

But it's all the same with factory ammo. A re-used case can get bent out of shape to such a degree as to render it unusable as well...

Fortunately, case gauges are so simple and cheap that they don't even come with instructions.



And I guess that's just about it... for now. :naughty:

Last but not least: YouTube is absolutely loaded with "how to" videos that will show you just exactly how to do a lot of this shit.

And then you have us. And you can trust us... :naughty:

No, really-- we wouldn't steer you wrong.

Except for SteveC... :shock:

--R :laugh2:

PS: Steve won't steer you wrong either. He's my go-to guy for various types of optics.
 
Last edited:

JonCanfield

Reality is over rated
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
7,764
Reaction score
23,399
I'd hit it. :thumb:

When it comes to tumblers, I'd agree with Who when he said that you don't really need one. When I first began hand loading, I was so broke that I was using a Lee Loader kit and didn't even have a press. What a trip that was... you end up forcing cartridge cases into a sizing die with a soft face mallet, flare the case mouth and crimp in the same manner-- by beating the cartridge case into a die with a soft hammer-- and you also deprime using a mallet tap, and you'd be tapping a new primer into the primer pocket the same way (but gently!) You'd always expect to have one or two new primers while you were trying to seat the new primer. And you'd use the volumetric spoon that came with the kit to throw powder charges. God help you if you didn't have any of the powder type that was indicated on the enclosed instruction sheet, though!

This is the Lee Loader kit. Looks like it was probably designed by somebody like Fred Flintstone, and talk about a slow process?

But if you were usually broke like me, it *did* work. :thumb:





In those no-bucks years, I used to just dump my cases into a pot with some water, add a couple of drops of dish washing liquid, heat the water to very hot-- but not boiling-- and stir with a wooden stick or spoon or something. The result was funky-looking brass, but again: it worked.

I still have my first proper scale and trickler-- bought that sucker in 1977, and it's still in use:

And I see that your kit includes one of these, along with a powder dispenser. So you're pretty much all set when it comes to that.

Now, a word about powder charges for straight-walled handgun cartridges, especially the .45 ACP. Basically, when it comes to charge weight consistency, "pretty close" is usually good enough with .45 ACP. One doesn't usually see much of a difference if one cartridge has .1 or .2 grains more powder in them than the next one-- and that's about the gross error one will usually see in the more common types of dispensers, except for while using a dispenser to throw extruded powder charges.

***************​

So for now, you can get alone without an extremely sophisticated dispenser if you need to save money, and can just go with one the RCBS Uniflow dispenser that is included with the kit you're bidding on.

***************​

As I indicated above, one powder type will be more consistent than others when charges are being throw using the type of dispenser included in the kit.

There are three basic types of powder: flake, spherical, and extruded. All of these terms pertain to the shape of the powder granules themselves. Of the three, spherical is the most consistent using a given powder dispenser, with flake powder being the next easiest powder type to work with. Extruded powder the most likely to throw inconsistent charge weights, again due to the shape of the granules of powder themselves... examples.

Looking at the shapes, it's pretty easy to figure out why this is so:


Spherical Powder vs. Extruded


Flake Powder vs Spherical

Because of the .45 ACP cartridge type you're interested in starting out with, the mass majority of powder types you'll be likely to encounter will be either flake or spherical. There are extruded types that are sometimes used to load handgun cartridges... but really, extruded powders are more commonly used by those who load for rifles.

If you're wondering about powder, I'd say this: look for either HP38 powder, which is one in the same as Winchester 231... literally the same. Same factory, same vat, same guy running the machine. :laugh2:

HP38 - Win 231 is a spherical (or "ball") powder, and it meters perfectly. Even with my low-rent Lee powder dispenser, it never throws a charge off by more than .1 grains... which is nothing, really, unless one is already loading to the max (a thing I never do).

Of course, there are probably at least 50 other powder types you can use with .45 ACP.


***************
Just a little left to say right now. Jon, I know this is a lot to take in all at once. But trust me: the guys in this thread will talk until we're blue in the face to help you out, and we wouldn't complain about it. :thumb:

But to continue:

The .45 ACP cartridge type is considered to be a "low pressure" type, meaning that the chamber pressure it develops will usually fall somewhere within 19-20 thousand PSI (or 16-17 thousand CUP, depending on how your manual likes to list stuff).

As such, you probably don't need a trimmer at all. In fact, with most straight-walled handgun cases (up to and including .44 Magnum IME) the case itself will fail (usually the neck cracks or primers are no longer secure in the primer pocket) before it lengthens so much as to go out of spec.

With bottle-neck rifle cartridges, one really does need a case trimmer, though. Those suckers "grow", or become longer in the neck, with surprising swiftness. Depending on the manufacturer, I've seen .223/5.56 cases lengthen by from .001" to .004" per loading. So depending on whether you go to loading for rifles or not, you may or may not want a case trimmer.

If you envision ever loading for rifle, just get a trimmer right now and be done with it.

I noticed that you'll also be needing a set of dies. If you purchase "carbide dies" you'll pay a small premium over stainless steel dies... but it's more than worth it because carbide is more slick and lasts a little longer. And yes: given enough time, you really *can* wear a die set out altogether!

As I said before: my dies range through Lee, and RCBS, and then my real specialty dies-- a neck sizing die and precision seating die-- are both from Redding. But these dies are quite critical and it was worth paying more for them. I don't think anybody *but* Redding does a precision seating die or not. But I'm sure somebody else does... :hmm:

No matter. What I've got is good enough. :thumb:

My final thing or three... :laugh2:

You'll probably want a vernier caliper. This thing comes in useful for measuring cartridge case length... though as Who and I have both already said, straight wall handgun cases don't tend to do much other than to keep shooting until they're spent, but seldom become longer and therefore difficult or impossible to chamber.



But the caliper is nice because it can help you to set up your bullet seating die (the thing that pushes the bullet into the case after you resize it, put a new primer in its ass and then load it with powder).

With the vernier caliper, you can measure Cartridge Over All Length... which you really do want to be able to do with any cartridge whatsoever, because there are minimums and maximums when it comes to that sort of thing.

You don't need a really expensive set of calipers to start with. The 15-buck special I posted above works just fine, and is definitely accurate enough for our uses. The only caution is that sometimes an el cheapo caliber will wear out before a more expensive item will.

But me? I always shoot for "cheap, but gets the job done". :laugh2:

Also: if you shoot anything bottle-necked, you want the calipers to measure cases... and a cartridge case gauge for the bottles, because sometimes just knowing the length of a casing isn't good enough. If you saw me talking about manufacturing .300 Blackout cases out of spent .223's, you might recall that not all of the cases I form actually come out in such a form as to be usable.

But it's all the same with factory ammo. A re-used case can get bent out of shape to such a degree as to render it unusable as well...

Fortunately, case gauges are so simple and cheap that they don't even come with instructions.



And I guess that's just about it... for now. :naughty:

Last but not least: YouTube is absolutely loaded with "how to" videos that will show you just exactly how to do a lot of this shit.

And then you have us. And you can trust us... :naughty:

No, really-- we wouldn't steer you wrong.

Except for SteveC... :shock:

--R :laugh2:

PS: Steve won't steer you wrong either. He's my go-to guy for various types of optics.
Gotta throw in a :rofl::rofl:for the @SteveC comment.

Tons of great info from all of you, I can't tell you how much I appreciate it! Time to talk to Kathy and see how much of my money I can spend (funny how that works - I earn it, but she seems to want input on how it gets spent)
 

Roberteaux

Super Mod
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
28,490
Reaction score
138,276
The Hornady lock n load sped my process up a bunch. It throws an occasional overcharge (has an alarm for that) but mostly with certain powders. It’s normal, and you can adjust the machine to minimize it. There’s a balance of speed and accurate powder throws. It’s all a learning experience.

Make sure to date and label your ammo. And keep good records of what “recipes” your using. You will want a bullet puller too. A lot of mistakes I’ve made have been in seating and getting the OAL/ crimp you’re shooting for when dialing up a load.

Case lube, you need case lube. And a tumbler. And a case trimmer.

This is excellent advice!

This is what I typically record:

20200329_170139.jpg

That's a box of .45's I reloaded.

The label indicates a 230-grain Round Nose, Full Metal Jacket bullet...

Sitting atop 5 grains of HP38 powder...

And I indicated that the case was of a type that uses a large standard pistol primer. The reason I included primer type is because there are also .45 cases that are set up to be used with small pistol primers, and it helps to save time keeping 'em separated.

Last, barely legible because of my camera flash: Cartridge Over All Length, or COAL, was set at 1.275"

As you go along, you'll learn that just like the cases, COAL is a thing with minimum and maximum specifications. And so I always keep track of that.

Surprised that I didn't put a date on the label, though... usually I do that also. I rotate my stock, shoot the oldest stuff first unless it's something very specialized.

ALSO:

Here's two types of .45 ACP projectile that I use:

20200329_171928.jpg

On the left we have a 230-grain Round Nose Full Metal Jacket type... or RN-FMJ. Really, really picky people would correct me and say, "No, that's a Total Metal Jacket because an FMJ type leaves the lead bare at the ass end."

And I'd shrug. They'd be right, but it's not a big deal. A reloading manual that actually specifies different loadings for the two types separately will be using the same numbers when it comes to powder charges, seating depths and so forth. It really doesn't matter all that much.

What does matter is this: the FMJ bullet on the left doesn't indicate where it wants to be crimped (and this kind of bullet only works well with a taper crimp anyway). And so, again, we need to be concerned about seating depth and therefore Cartridge Over All Length... or COAL.

On the right is a 230-grain Round Nose Lead bullet. And I'd like to draw your attention to the shoulder just above the line of blue lubricating compound that has been injected into a groove on the bullet near the ass end...

You can see that the shoulder stops at a point, right... just a little bit above the end of the blue goo.

Well, one nice thing about RNL bullets is this: one doesn't usually have to guess where to crimp them. The crimp should be place right at the very top of that shoulder I'm pointing out...you put a nice, tight taper crimp right there (or a deep roll crimp if you prefer), and your ammo won't hang up while chambering.

If all you used was RNL bullets, you might never need calipers because you can see where the crimp goes... except that sometimes the bullet really will get shorter, as Monkey said in his excellent post. That's because sometimes the metal of the cartridge case where the crimp was formed gets weak and deteriorates over time.

I've never bothered measuring such things, mainly because I never found a case too far out of spec to be useful. But people who are more precise than me will usually check that stuff anyway-- and hola! Now you need calipers again!

:laugh2:

Me? I just shoot 'em until the neck splits or the primers fall out of the cases. And then I hit 'em with a big machinist's mallet to put them out of their misery-- and so they won't somehow accidentally get mixed back in with cases that are still good.

You'll find that the bullets for something such as .223 may also have a crimping groove, like these Hornady bullets:



Again: that crimping groove makes life easier... and hey: that's a true FMJ bullet right there, because you can see the lead at the ass end.

But no matter what: if you're loading .223 or 5.56mm (the difference between them really boils down to the pressure you can load them to) you want those damned calipers and that damned case trimmer because bottleneck cartridges really do lengthen, and quickly at that.

For case trimming, I use this Redding model:

20200329_220818.jpg

I got that thing about 25 years ago... and have never replaced the titanium cutting head because it's still cutting true and smoothly. But no matter what, I always hit a freshly cut case... or really, most any case that has been recently resized-- with a light touch of the chamfering tool just to keep everything right.

Don't worry about the chamfering tool: I noticed that one is included with the kit you're already bidding on. :thumb:

Damn, man... look at how cruddy my case trimmer looks. There's a big, dirty thumb print on the right side upright, because I've never had enough bench space to bolt it and am too lazy to drill holes and bolt the thing down and then unbolt it when I'm done...

Looks like shit! Got rust all over it from living in a garage in steamy Florida for its entire life. But it just keeps on keepin' on, and I admire that in a tool.

***************​

One time when I was a little kid, my father was splitting wood and I asked him about the cruddy-looking ax he was using for the job. He protested my description of the ax as being cruddy-looking and told me primly that this was his favorite ax. I got snotty with him and said, "Next you'll be telling me to admire its character!" He laughed and said that indeed, that ax sure did have character. But that wasn't the reason it was his favorite.

So, taking the bait like a fool, I asked him what made this his favorite ax, then. He again said that I should look carefully at it. I retorted that I already had and it still looked like crap.

But then he laughed and told me I was dumb for not understanding what was so great about that particular ax.

Truly aggravated now, I asked him to just tell me straight up then, and he laughed again as he said,

"It's because I've had it for so long. Why, that ax has had three different handles and two different heads!"

:facepalm:

Dad was like that. He'd mess with your mind at any opportunity. And they wonder why I came out of the ordeal of being raised by the guy with so much top spin and scrambola... :laugh2:

Ugh. But I digress...

***************​

I just wanted to mention that Redding fans (and yes, reloading companies do have actual fans of their products, same as guitar manufacturers do) say that this is the best case trimmer out there. The reason? It's because this trimmer fixes the cutting head, while allowing the operator to force the rotating case into the cutting head... instead of having the cutting head rotating and being forced into the case.

Supposedly, we end up with a more squared-off trim.

Personally, I've never noticed that any of them seemed to do this job better than any other, except to say that you do NOT want the el cheapo Lee version that you stick on the end of a hand drill. I tried it just to see WTF and man, trust me: you do not want to go there.

So basically, some tools are better than others... but in the end?

If it works, it works.

"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law!"
--Aleister Crowley

Damn. How did he get in here? :shock:

--R :laugh2:
 
Last edited:

Neffco

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2013
Messages
2,387
Reaction score
4,334
Spring turkey starts in 12 days. I’m headed here. Nothing like some fresh meat during these times. I’ll be using my bow though.
1461341C-079C-4905-AAB1-BADAA8B71246.jpeg
 

GunMonkeyINTL

Senior Member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
599
Reaction score
1,291
Damn, man... look at how cruddy my case trimmer looks. There's a big, dirty thumb print on the right side upright, because I've never had enough bench space to bolt it and am too lazy to drill holes and bolt the thing down and then unbolt it when I'm done...
Obviously, your trimmer works fine not bolted down, but, for what it’s worth, I never bolt any of my reloading tools down. I generally find whatever scrap of 2x? I have laying around, counter-sink some mounting bolts up from the bottom, and bolt the press / powder measure / whatever to that. Then, I clamp the wood to the bench.

That way, I can lay my bench out however is best for what I’m doing. Brass prep (ugh), the presses stay clean and out of the way. If I’m loading rifle, I may want my Rockchucker on the left (sizing / crimping) and and my Lee on the right (seating). Pistol; may only clamp up one press.

I started doing then when I first started gunsmithing professionally, and was shooting every Monday morning with a bunch of retired vets. We did our load development right at the bench, so we generally showed up with sized, primed brass, and did our charging and seating on your shooting bench.

Every once in a while, we’d mess around and see how few cases you could use in an entire morning of shooting (neck-sizing only, of course). Groups were shot-1, reload, shot-2, reload...
 


Latest Threads



Top