Ideal rate of twist (MLP firearms and shooting thread)

SteveC

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Relevant excerpts from an ATF memo on transfer of NFA items in decedents' estates:

For registered NFA firearms in the estate, the executor should take action as soon as possible to arrange for the proper registration of the firearms. Possession of an NFA firearm not registered to the possessor is a violation of Federal law and the firearm is subject to seizure and forfeiture. However, we do allow the executor a reasonable time to arrange for the transfer of the registered firearms in a decedent’s estate. This generally should be done before probate is closed.

It is the responsibility of the executor of the estate to maintain custody and control of the firearms and to transfer the firearms registered to the decedent.

The firearms may be transferred on a tax-exempt basis to a lawful heir. The executor would apply on ATF Form 5, Application for Tax Exempt Transfer and Registration of a Firearm, for a tax-exempt transfer to a lawful heir. A lawful heir is anyone named in the decedent’s will or, in the absence of a will, anyone entitled to inherit under the laws of the State in which the decedent last resided. NFA firearms may be transferred directly interstate to a beneficiary of the estate. When a firearm is being transferred to an individual heir, his or her fingerprints on FBI Forms FD-258 must accompany the transfer application. However, if any Federal, State or local law prohibits the heir from receiving or possessing the firearm, ATF will not approve the application.

But, with a trust, your family members (who are presumably on the trust, in the first place) just come back from your funeral and they are good to go. They already have ownership based on being members of the trust that you set up. There is nothing for them to do, but take your (well, theirs now) Class-3 shit out to the range and have a blast in your memory :)

No cost. No forms. No hassles. I'd rather deal with that stuff now, even at some additional tine & expense on me.
 

smk506

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But, with a trust, your family members (who are presumably on the trust, in the first place) just come back from your funeral and they are good to go. They already have ownership based on being members of the trust that you set up. There is nothing for them to do, but take your (well, theirs now) Class-3 shit out to the range and have a blast in your memory :)

No cost. No forms. No hassles. I'd rather deal with that stuff now, even at some additional tine & expense on me.

True enough, just make sure all the trustees are on board with the process of fingerprinting and photos any time you decide to add anything class 3 to the trust. That killed it for me, too much of a PITA to organize 4-5 people getting everything done, just wasn’t worth it.

I still have my trust, but no longer any trustees aside from myself and dad, he’s retired so he can get printed and photoed at his leisure, but even he might be coming off soon as we no longer live as close.

Just food for thought.
 

smk506

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Pistols.

Who here doesn’t have one or four? This will be another two part when I’ve time to assemble and photograph the rest, but let’s grt started!

44E69677-415B-4277-855F-759AB3052A76.jpeg


So from left to right here we have a Ruger Blackhawk 9mm/.357 convertable. These come with two cylinders, one for 9mm and the other for .38/.357. These are built like tanks wish they were built. Some consider them the ultimate survival gun being able to chamber 3 different rounds very common to North America. These are dreams to shoot and very accurate. Hitting pie plates at 100 yards is beyond doable.

Next down is my poor, poor S&W victory. I’ll fitting hogue grips, cheesy peeling nickle plating, cut down barrel, replaced sight, and bored cylinders compliment the bent ejection rod nicely. Why do I even own this?


In the middle is a neat piece from the surplus collection, a CCCP marked nagant revolver. This thing is a really unique revolver with so much going on I couldn’t take pics of everything. For one thing, they have a crisp clean double action trigger pull of roughly 28 pounds(jk, kinda). Seriously, this is one mother of a trigger. The pinned firing pins on these are probably a good 1/2 long and were probably repurposed into finish nails after the war ;) . There’s a loading gate on the opposite side of the picture that is literally just a pinned piece of metal that fold over the cylinder.

Here’s one thing I did get pics of though, the forward locking mechanism on the cylinder.

Below we see the cylinder as it typically sits, there’s a typical, if not long cylinder gap and we can see the forcing cone as usual.

ED68EEBD-0A4F-40E6-9878-4A1C55DF21E2.jpeg



Now when the hammer is cocked, two things happen. Per usual we have the rotation of the cylinder bringing a fresh chamber in line with the barrel, but the second half of the cocking process also pushes and locks the cylinder forward against the forcing cone as seen here.

84B2CC23-EA7E-4805-A54E-A6D6C7072CFF.jpeg


Remember that brutal double action trigger? ;)

Now the quicker thinking ones here have already figured out that this means you can in fact suppress this pistol. I’ve not done it and won’t to mine, but I’ve seen it done and apparently it works fairly well.
I feel really stupid for not taking pictures of the ammo as that’s another neat thing, but briefly the case actually closes up over the bullet and seats inside the forcing cone. Pretty neat.



Lastly on the table are the walther P1 and my star model B.

The walther is a cool pistol, after the failure of the riech walther I suppose in an effort to distance themselves from anything nazi ceased production on the venerable P38 and began production of the P1. Its the same thing with an extra frame lug added later in the 60’s I believe. Kind of a poor mans pseudo WWII relic I guess.


The model freaking B.

I...

I don’t want to talk about it, I’ll just leave this here http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2012/09/foghorn/gun-review-star-model-b/

along with a note that sometimes the best thing to do with a malfunctioning gun is to oil it up, stick it in a gun rug and move on with life.


Next installment; pistols part two, the electric bugaloo.
 

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Roberteaux

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Pistols.

Who here doesn’t have one or four? This will be another two part when I’ve time to assemble and photograph the rest, but let’s grt started!

View attachment 282727

So from left to right here we have a Ruger Blackhawk 9mm/.357 convertable. These come with two cylinders, one for 9mm and the other for .38/.357. These are built like tanks wish they were built. Some consider them the ultimate survival gun being able to chamber 3 different rounds very common to North America. These are dreams to shoot and very accurate. Hitting pie plates at 100 yards is beyond doable.

Next down is my poor, poor S&W victory. I’ll fitting hogue grips, cheesy peeling nickle plating, cut down barrel, replaced sight, and bored cylinders compliment the bent ejection rod nicely. Why do I even own this?


In the middle is a neat piece from the surplus collection, a CCCP marked nagant revolver. This thing is a really unique revolver with so much going on I couldn’t take pics of everything. For one thing, they have a crisp clean double action trigger pull of roughly 28 pounds(jk, kinda). Seriously, this is one mother of a trigger. The pinned firing pins on these are probably a good 1/2 long and were probably repurposed into finish nails after the war ;) . There’s a loading gate on the opposite side of the picture that is literally just a pinned piece of metal that fold over the cylinder.

Here’s one thing I did get pics of though, the forward locking mechanism on the cylinder.

Below we see the cylinder as it typically sits, there’s a typical, if not long cylinder gap and we can see the forcing cone as usual.

View attachment 282728


Now when the hammer is cocked, two things happen. Per usual we have the rotation of the cylinder bringing a fresh chamber in line with the barrel, but the second half of the cocking process also pushes and locks the cylinder forward against the forcing cone as seen here.

View attachment 282729

Remember that brutal double action trigger? ;)

Now the quicker thinking ones here have already figured out that this means you can in fact suppress this pistol. I’ve not done it and won’t to mine, but I’ve seen it done and apparently it works fairly well.
I feel really stupid for not taking pictures of the ammo as that’s another neat thing, but briefly the case actually closes up over the bullet and seats inside the forcing cone. Pretty neat.



Lastly on the table are the walther P1 and my star model B.

The walther is a cool pistol, after the failure of the riech walther I suppose in an effort to distance themselves from anything nazi ceased production on the venerable P38 and began production of the P1. Its the same thing with an extra frame lug added later in the 60’s I believe. Kind of a poor mans pseudo WWII relic I guess.


The model freaking B.

I...

I don’t want to talk about it, I’ll just leave this here http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2012/09/foghorn/gun-review-star-model-b/

along with a note that sometimes the best thing to do with a malfunctioning gun is to oil it up, stick it in a gun rug and move on with life.


Next installment; pistols part two, the electric bugaloo.
Very interesting post... you've got some cool stuff there, even if your Model B is a jammamatic...

I enjoyed reading what I found at the link you posted, too. It was all news to me... :D

--R :thumb:
 

smk506

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Very interesting post... you've got some cool stuff there, even if your Model B is a jammamatic...

I enjoyed reading what I found at the link you posted, too. It was all news to me... :D

--R :thumb:
Thanks for the kind words Rob! I enjoy sharing my stuff and this is much easier if less satisfying than hauling a bunch of stuff to the range and meeting people there.


If you get a chance to buy pretty much anything star for a good price I would encourage you to do so if for no other reason than as a piece of a long and storied firearm building history that is all but erased in modern times.

Unfortunately we’re nearing the end of the collection, I have another 2 maybe 3 installments left before it’s finished though and a few more cool things to share with you guys.
 

Roberteaux

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Thanks for the kind words Rob! I enjoy sharing my stuff and this is much easier if less satisfying than hauling a bunch of stuff to the range and meeting people there.


If you get a chance to buy pretty much anything star for a good price I would encourage you to do so if for no other reason than as a piece of a long and storied firearm building history that is all but erased in modern times.

Unfortunately we’re nearing the end of the collection, I have another 2 maybe 3 installments left before it’s finished though and a few more cool things to share with you guys.
I can only recall seeing one Star pistol in person. I didn't know anything about the history of the Star handguns, but recall that the one I saw looked quite a lot like a 1911, but was chambered in 9mm Largo. That's the first and only time I saw a Star handgun-- and the only time I ever ran across anything at all that was chambered in 9mm Largo.

In fact, I'd never heard of the cartridge before and was told by the guy who owned it that he had a devil of a time finding factory loadings for that pistol. He said he almost never shot it because of this. But he had it as a sort of collector's item and wasn't too upset by this.

As for your posts: so far, they've been great! :thumb:

You can break 'em down some, if you want to stretch it all out... but I've enjoyed seeing your collection all along.

--R :thumb:
 

ehb

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I've see a couple of Stars over the years... Not many out there around here...

Seen more Tokies than Stars in my area...
 

Roberteaux

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I've see a couple of Stars over the years... Not many out there around here...

Seen more Tokies than Stars in my area...
Yes, I've seen some of the Tokarev pistols, and a smaller number of Radoms over the years-- but just that one Star.

I've only seen one Llama pistol over the years, too. I thought they were made somewhere in South America, but just a couple of minutes ago went to check that and found out that like the Star handguns, the Llamas were actually made in Spain-- and in the same part of Spain where the Star pistols were made, too.

That Llama was chambered for .38 Super, and I first learned olf the existence of that cartridge as a result of seeing the Llama. I looked at the ballistics and was pretty impressed. That .38 Super comes close to the muzzle energy and velocity of a .357 Magnum, which I found surprising when I first heard of it.

A couple of years later, I got to talking with one of the investigators with the sheriff's department who carried a genuine Colt 1911 chambered in .38 Super. He really loved that setup and had been carrying it for years before I met him. Most of the other C.I.D. guys were carrying things like S&W 39's, 59's, Browning Hi-Powers... and then there were a bunch of others who carried J-frame S&W's of various types, but this one dude kept on with that .38 Super until he retired.

Every now and then, I get to thinking of picking up an RIA 1911 in .38 Super... there's just something very cool about that cartridge. But right now I'm up to my ass in alligators messing with that .300 BLK and my .270 Winchester rifles... and both projects look as though they'll be consuming most of my time and effort for the foreseeable future.

--R
 
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scott1970

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Sure do-- shotguns are nice! :thumb:

--R
Shotguns???

Oh yeah! I remember carrying them at work before our chief declared them useless and banned them.

I encounter Llamas at work with some regularity. The very first one I ever saw was in a Super 8 Motel room. It was a 1911 style .380 which an old Army vet used to spatter his brains on the wall.

Everybody should own a .38 Super. Outside of the .41 Mag it is probably my all time favorite handgun cartridge. It is the most forgiving cartridge when it comes to handloading. I've yet to load a combo that isn't insanely accurate. I've owned a variety of them, and I still have this Sig P220-1.

 
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scott1970

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I am not familiar with the above ammo, but the similar ammo developed for the Judge .410 performed wonderfully at my range.
 

Roberteaux

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So....this popped up near me today.......is this the same company?
Yes.

Looks like it....what does the “M” stand for in the “BM”??
The M stands for "mediano", which is a Spanish word that translates to "medium".

Star Model B pistols that featured a shorter barrel were designated as Star Model BM, or "B Medium", to separate them from the full-sized Model B also produced by the company. It's sort of the same as Colt referring to their shortened M1911 as a "Commander".

Apparently the Spanish weren't thinking of some of the other things that might be referred to as a "BM" by English-speaking people when they gave a name to that model of handgun... :laugh2:

Is the asking price in the ballpark?
No clue. :dunno:

--R
 
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Roberteaux

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What dat?

Dat bees a Lehigh Defense™ Multiple Projectile cartridge. Them bees five stacked, solid copper projectiles, designed to spew forth in a shotgunnish sort of way.

Here's some of the company's propaganda:

"Multiple Projectile ammunition provides a significant advantage in high stress shooting situations where control is limited or shooter experience may be in question. The fact that a single shot spreads out as it approaches its target statistically improves your chances of effectively eliminating the threat in your environment."

No idea why they're showing us a tight little cluster of five shots in that graphic. I've never messed with the stuff and don't know how the thing would pattern at specific distances, but can't imagine that a group like that would be the result if somebody fired one of these suckers at somebody else who wasn't almost at bad breath range...

Lehigh is noted as the "tricky bullet" company, with projectiles of various types that nobody else seems to produce. Talkin' about hollowpoints with separation grooves cut clear to the brass, weirdo corkscrew-lookin' bullets, and so forth.

https://www.lehighdefense.com/

--R
 
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