I think I may have a problem.

SGeoff

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There are lots of reasons why we buy the guitars we do, and not all of them are, or need to be, musical. I grew up poor, playing one borrowed or cheapie own guitar at a time. I was glad to have anything. For most of my life, I had one guitar, sometimes one I made myself, at a time. Fine. Then, several decades into my career (not music) I hit a point where I got a big bonus and realized I could just buy whatever guitar I wanted. And numerous, if I wanted. It was a big day in my life when I could walk into a great music store, not feel like a trespasser, and see if maybe I wanted to buy one. I ended up spending $5K. This will never be defensible on practical terms, as I am a proficient non-professional. But it allowed me to experience my own growth and achievements and professional standing in life in a really rewarding way. I've acquired a small number of great guitars since then. I think most of us do our GASsing for different reasons, including mine, and as so many of you have said, the goal is to enjoy these meaningful and enjoyable experiences but not to get compulsive or just habitual about it, because without restraint, the enjoyment gets briefer and shallower and unrewarding... it just becomes collecting, which to me is either business or hoarding -- treating guitars as objects, not instruments for something.
yes, it is nice to have different axes with different characteristics. i personally don't want 10 of the same thing
 

Breezin

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So, back in December '18 I decided to start playing again in my retirement. Great idea!

I picked up a nice 90s MIM Strat (I had always played Stratocasters) and a cheap tube amp and I was on my way. A month later and I'm picking on a mint 2008 USA Strat. Bliss!

Somewhere along the way, I guess it was Jan./Feb. '19 I took this Epi Les Paul in in trade (buy, sell, trade, that's a whole other story with me, lol). I kinda' liked it. I liked the way the humbuckers made my amp sound in comparison to my Strat.

All that led to my first real Gibson; an inexpensive Ebony Studio. It all seems so long ago, lol.

View attachment 365639

You know what most of us call that ?








A starter kit.

Hang on, its gonna get crazy.
 

wmachine

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So, back in December '18 I decided to start playing again in my retirement. Great idea!

I picked up a nice 90s MIM Strat (I had always played Stratocasters) and a cheap tube amp and I was on my way. A month later and I'm picking on a mint 2008 USA Strat. Bliss!

Somewhere along the way, I guess it was Jan./Feb. '19 I took this Epi Les Paul in in trade (buy, sell, trade, that's a whole other story with me, lol). I kinda' liked it. I liked the way the humbuckers made my amp sound in comparison to my Strat.

All that led to my first real Gibson; an inexpensive Ebony Studio. It all seems so long ago, lol.




















View attachment 365639
I'd be willing to bet the at some time in the not so distant future, you will look back at this and say "And I thought I had a problem then...."
Not really a problem as long as you proceed with your head up. It is a fantastic journey if you can afford it.
 

Christosterone

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Gibsons (especially les Pauls) are ruinously awesome...
Someone posted a great point in another thread that compared to cars or boats or art, les Pauls are a very affordable hobby....again, relatively speaking...

I won’t spend more than $3k on anything because my brain breaks at that number...my better half makes those decisions....
But a grand here and there give me more joy than anything other than cats...and my family....but also cats...like lots of cats

-Chris
 

gnappi

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I'm in a similar situation. After a divorce and retirement I can do what and when I want, now I need a bigger house. Have fun with your newly re-found hobby :)

Just remember at the end of the day gambling gets nothing but new parking lots at the casinos, drugs make people dead, and alcohol kills you. Gits are a pretty safe way to spend your time.

PS, your problem has just begun...

ES345_335_333_347_330+rarebirds.jpg
 
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rogue3

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If the world spent more time making music,and less time on some other things,it would be a better world,imo.Nothing crosses world wide culture barriers like a good Gibson or Fender.(just a personal bias,with a grain of truth,i think...and all the other fine instrument makers out there!)

The op is doing just fine!...another amp might be fun.strongly recommend a Fender Deluxe!
 

rogue3

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So, back in December '18 I decided to start playing again in my retirement. Great idea!

I picked up a nice 90s MIM Strat (I had always played Stratocasters) and a cheap tube amp and I was on my way. A month later and I'm picking on a mint 2008 USA Strat. Bliss!

Somewhere along the way, I guess it was Jan./Feb. '19 I took this Epi Les Paul in in trade (buy, sell, trade, that's a whole other story with me, lol). I kinda' liked it. I liked the way the humbuckers made my amp sound in comparison to my Strat.

All that led to my first real Gibson; an inexpensive Ebony Studio. It all seems so long ago, lol.




















View attachment 365639
Let me get this straight...the op is having a blast! Go for it brother, as long as you are not reduced to hot dogs and canned beans!

Age related post retirement depression is real, and playing instruments is an outstanding preventative measure.We have brothers here who have found a way to treat that...and so have you! This is a good crutch to have. I might recommend some social interaction with music down the road...with other players.

If the world spent more time making music,and less time on some other things,it would be a better world,imo.Nothing crosses world wide culture barriers like a good Gibson or Fender.(just a personal bias,with a grain of truth,i think...and all the other fine instrument makers out there!)

The op is doing just fine!...another amp might be fun.strongly recommend a Fender Deluxe! Save the funds and invest in a fine acoustic as well. Acoustic jams are a great social occasion to enjoy.
 

Macronaut

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There are lots of reasons why we buy the guitars we do, and not all of them are, or need to be, musical. I grew up poor, playing one borrowed or cheapie own guitar at a time. I was glad to have anything. For most of my life, I had one guitar, sometimes one I made myself, at a time. Fine. Then, several decades into my career (not music) I hit a point where I got a big bonus and realized I could just buy whatever guitar I wanted. And numerous, if I wanted. It was a big day in my life when I could walk into a great music store, not feel like a trespasser, and see if maybe I wanted to buy one. I ended up spending $5K. This will never be defensible on practical terms, as I am a proficient non-professional. But it allowed me to experience my own growth and achievements and professional standing in life in a really rewarding way. I've acquired a small number of great guitars since then. I think most of us do our GASsing for different reasons, including mine, and as so many of you have said, the goal is to enjoy these meaningful and enjoyable experiences but not to get compulsive or just habitual about it, because without restraint, the enjoyment gets briefer and shallower and unrewarding... it just becomes collecting, which to me is either business or hoarding -- treating guitars as objects, not instruments for something.
Similar story here.
 

MSB

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I bought everything I could get my hands on at first. Once I figured out what I liked/didn't like, it was real easy to thin down the herd to a reasonable number. I've had as many as 10 LPs at one time, but most were redundant or had something I didn't "love." There is nothing wrong with having a "few" if you use them and/or have a specific purpose for them or if you have the money and space. If you keep your eye out, you shouldn't even lose money on them, so for the cost of a pack of strings and/or a couple pieces of hardware you could get some very informative hands on experience.
 

Macronaut

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yes, it is nice to have different axes with different characteristics. i personally don't want 10 of the same thing
I never, ever imagined having five LPs...ever! I am still amazed at how different each of my LPs are from the other and I love them all, though differently. Having said that, I do have a few that will be moving on, likely to be replaced with other LPs that better suit specific things I may be looking for or characteristics I didn't even realize I was missing.
 

Macronaut

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I HAVE to thank you all for the kind words and encouragement! I don't have a lot of friends and you guys and ladies are a blast to interact with.

Just had to share that, lol.
Most of us are the best enablers you could ever hope for. Though it seems that you don't need much coaxing ;)
 

Texsunburst59

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For me things got crazy guitar wise when I stopped gigging after 25+ yrs. in '09.

Up until that time I had only about 10 guitars and 1 bass.

Since then, I got up to 80+ guitars/basses about 4 yrs. ago.

I had several purges since then, and I'm down to 48 instruments.

With every guitar/bass purge, I've upgraded the quality of the "new/used" instruments I bring into the collection.

I'm going to try to get down to 25-30 instruments in the future.

I know even 25-30 is a lot to take care of, but there are some really good instruments that I'd have a really hard time letting at that point.

Here's the 33 sentimental/great guitars/basses in my collection I'd have a very hard time letting go.


63 Gibson ES-330 TDC w/ Bigsby
'70 Gibson Cherry ES-335
'72 Fender Tele Custom
'75 Fender Mocha Strat
'79 Fender Antigua Strat
'80 Gibson Les Paul Standard (58RI)
Quilted Sunburst "Jimmy Wallace"
'80 Gibson Cream Explorer
'83 Gibson Dot Cherry ES-335
'86 Fender MIJ '69RI Pink Paisley Tele
'88 Paul Reed Smith Goltop "Special"
'89 Gibson Heritage Cherry Sunburst
LP Standard
'90 Fender 50's RI Strat "Blackie"
'91 Fender 50's RI Tele Candy Apple
'95 PRS Purple Trans Custom 24 10-Top
'99 Tom Anderson Hollow Drop Top Classic
Cajun Red Quilt
'00 Epiphone G-400 LE Korina SG
'01 Gibson Les Paul DC Amber Quilt
'03 Tom Anderson Tiger Eye Hollow T Drop Top
'09 PRS DGT 10-Top Sunburst
'15 Fender Sea Foam Green Mag 7 Tele
'15 Suhr Sherwood Metallic Green Classic Pro
Strat

Classical and Acoustic Guitars:

'78 Gibson Gospel
'80 Sigma DM-3
'83 Yamaha G-231 II Classical
'98 Baby Taylor
'03 Yamaha CG171SF Classical Flamenco
'03 Taylor Jumbo Custom Acoustic/Electric
'04 Ramirez 1-E Classical
'09 Breedlove Roots OM/SR acoustic/electric

Basses:
'74 Fender Jazz Bass Sunburst/Maple Neck
'78 Fender Natural Precision Bass
'90 Fender MIJ '57 RI Vintage
White Precision Bass
'94 Fender Jazz V Plus Bass
 




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