I just purchased a Standard 60s and there are a few things that I'm a little concerned about and wanted to get some other opinions on

cracky6711

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There's 3 things in particular that I've noticed:
  1. Buzzing noise until I touch any metal part of the guitar (strings, pickup, bridge e.t.c)
  2. Rattling noise coming from the Rhythm/Treble switch
  3. Pickups can wobble?

Number 1 - Buzzing noise until I touch any metal part of the guitar (strings, pickup, bridge e.t.c)
So number 1 is by far my biggest concern here. There is a buzzing noise coming out of the amp which stops when I touch a metal part of the guitar. I have seen a few other posts here about it but from what I've read most people are saying if it's not happening with other guitars then It's likely an issue? I can only assume there is something wrong with the electronics leading to a bad ground somewhere? I tested the same cable and same amp on my old Squier Strat and it's fine, so the humbuckers should be at least as quiet I would have thought?
Link to a video of the Les Paul:
And a video with the same amp & same cable but using my old Squier Strat:


Number 2 - Rattling noise coming from the Rhythm/Treble switch
I guess this one is less of a concern because once you have it hooked up to an amp it will be much louder than the noise coming from the switch, but still I wanted to understand if this is to be expected?
Video:


Number 3- Pickups can wobble?
This one is just more of a general question than anything, but are the pickups supposed to be able to move?
Video:
 

1allspub

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1) sounds like there may be a ground issue (not uncommon unfortunately).

2) take the switch back plate off and try tightening the switch... it may be a little loose—easy!

3) yes, they move. They are meant to be height adjustable and are only held to the pickup rings by the 2 screws in the middle of each pickup ring... thus they will wobble if you press on either end (teeter-totter effect).
 

cracky6711

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Perfect, cheers for the response! Honestly I would be all up for taking a look at the switch and even wouldn't mind taking a look at the cabling to understand where the grounding issue is but since it's brand new I wouldn't want to do anything that might give the shop a reason not to accept a return.

Having said that, I do really like the burst & finish on this specific guitar and standard 60s BBs are becoming surprisingly hard to find for now so I might have a word with the shop and see what they recommend.
 

1allspub

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Tightening the 3way switch is super easy. You’re not going to affect it in any way negatively. Don’t worry about that. I would not start messing with the wiring harness though if you think you might return it. That said, if the place you bought it is local (ie, not online) they probably have a luthier/tech on staff that can take a look at it and fix any of these issues in a few minutes. These LP Standards are super simple guitars. Easy to work on.
 

PauloQS

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As for 2, if you only hear the rattle in the middle position, that’s completely normal. 2 and 3 are, in my personal opinion, not legit reasons for a replacement. Buyers remorse, sure, but there isn’t anything inherently wrong with the guitar. As for 1, I wouldn’t personally return because it’s a super easy fix, but I would let the shop know. With that said, I think it’s a legitimate reason for you to have the shop remedy it, either by replacing the guitar, fixing it themselves or cover the cost of having it fixed by someone. With that said, if the guitar plays and sounds great, I would recommend going the fixing route.
 

cybermgk

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Are you sure #2 is the switch rattling? Hold the switch and repeat. If the rattle goes away, then Bob's your uncle.
 

bwillard

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I have the same guitar. I got it and it and couldn't stand the noise! I think it must be a problem with this run of guitars. I took it to a shop and had them shield the cavity. They only installed shielding on the cover. I suspect that there was something else going on with the grounding that they also fixed. When I got it back it was DEAD silent.
 

DaveSG

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I have the same guitar. I got it and it and couldn't stand the noise! I think it must be a problem with this run of guitars. I took it to a shop and had them shield the cavity. They only installed shielding on the cover. I suspect that there was something else going on with the grounding that they also fixed. When I got it back it was DEAD silent.
Good to hear. Also...your sig...I gotta ask: which is your favorite? :fingersx:
 

AJK1

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What did the seller have to say about the issues ?
 

rumble

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If you touch the strings or any metal parts and the noise goes away, then it’s just that the guitar needs better shielding. You may have dirty power (e.g. dimmable lights turned in? in a room full of electronic devices) or the amp is plugged into an ungrounded wall socket.

As a matter of fact, if you take a look at the pickup cavity, you’ll find that the cavity is not shielded at all. In saying that, not all people shield their guitars though.
 

Brek

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all my guitars do that Gibson les Paul, fender strat and tele, hmmm, I assumed it was normal, I must have really bad mains.
 

moreles

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Unless you are experienced, doing minor work on a new guitar is a massive mistake. You can easily do damage removing a switch, for example; all you have to do is have a wrench slip. Or lay the guitar on top of a table the turns out to have one grain of sand on it. Or have the switch rotate as you remove it and a wire pops off of a tab.
1allspub did a great rundown of probabilities. Contact the dealer/seller and ask them how to proceed. My greatest concern is the grounding issue, as it can be elusive even though a LP circuit, grounding included, is relatively simple.
I'm sorry you have these glitches. Both Gibson and the retailer failed in their responsibility to check the instrument, forcing you to do the QC inspection for yourself. I'd be angry, and would direct this to the retailer, as they, not Gibson, are the seller.
 

Ancient Rocker

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  1. Buzzing noise until I touch any metal part of the guitar (strings, pickup, bridge e.t.c)
Your grounding is working properly if, when you touch metal, the buzz goes away. The buzz is actually coming from YOU as we emit EMI. (which is why the shielding on the cover of your control cavity helped!) When you touch metal, you're grounding yourself and the buzz goes away. Will you actually play your guitar without touching the strings?
  1. Rattling noise coming from the Rhythm/Treble switch
I'm assuming this is only in the middle position...right? Tightening the switch assembly into the body won't help with this. I've re-tensioned the contacts a bit on several guitars and that took care of it. You can just replace that switch with a new Switchcraft with tighter tolerances and you'll be fine.
  1. Pickups can wobble?
The pickup springs they install at the factory are not very stout. When you lower the pickup, like you need to do, especially with the neck pup on a LP, you loose compression on that spring as well. If the wobble bothers you, simply replace the springs with silicone tubing (RC fuel line) which is what I use on all my custom builds. Cut the tubing to a length that allows a tiny bit of the end of the screw exposed once its slid on and you'll have all the tension you'll need to keep the pickup SOLID.
Finally, if you live near St. Paul, MN, contact me at gloryguitars.com and I'll get you fixed right up!
Good luck!
 
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golfnut

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My LP standard 50 has a very slight buzz almost imperceptible. I don't even notice it compared to my single coil guitars.
 

octavedoctor

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There's 3 things in particular that I've noticed:
  1. Buzzing noise until I touch any metal part of the guitar (strings, pickup, bridge e.t.c)
  2. Rattling noise coming from the Rhythm/Treble switch
  3. Pickups can wobble?

Number 1 - Buzzing noise until I touch any metal part of the guitar (strings, pickup, bridge e.t.c)
So number 1 is by far my biggest concern here. There is a buzzing noise coming out of the amp which stops when I touch a metal part of the guitar. I have seen a few other posts here about it but from what I've read most people are saying if it's not happening with other guitars then It's likely an issue? I can only assume there is something wrong with the electronics leading to a bad ground somewhere? I tested the same cable and same amp on my old Squier Strat and it's fine, so the humbuckers should be at least as quiet I would have thought?
Link to a video of the Les Paul:
And a video with the same amp & same cable but using my old Squier Strat:


Number 2 - Rattling noise coming from the Rhythm/Treble switch
I guess this one is less of a concern because once you have it hooked up to an amp it will be much louder than the noise coming from the switch, but still I wanted to understand if this is to be expected?
Video:


Number 3- Pickups can wobble?
This one is just more of a general question than anything, but are the pickups supposed to be able to move?
Video:
All of this is normal behaviour, unfortunately. The "hands-off" buzz is inductive noise caused by a lack of cavity screening. From the late eighties onwards, Gibson have been steadily cutting corners in their production, starting by deleting any cavity screening.

Historically, Les Pauls used to have heavy duty screening cans around all their electronics. I first started noticing these missing from new Gibsons around the mid-nineties, but I'm not sure when the practice started. The fact that the buzz - which is caused by excessive lengths of unscreened signal wire acting as aerials - diminishes when you touch the guitar indicates that the earth path is fine; there is no earth/grounding issue (well, there may be a problem elsewhere in the circuit knowing Gibson's general sloppy incompetence, but that particular symptom isn't one).

Get a trusted tech to rewire it, minimising the excess exposed signal path and add a graphite paint screen.

The rattling toggle switch is probably just excess play in the toggle hinge. Squirt some vaseline in the hinge and that will damp the vibration. Anyhdrous lanolin is even better as it is tacky and solidifies more at room temperature but it's not vegan friendly as it's a by product of the wool industry.

Gibson pickups, along with most manufacturers, use a two point mounting bracket with springs. This is traditional, but unstable. The fix is simple. Get some silicon tubing on eBay, about 6mm OD, 3mm internal, and replace the springs with that. Not only will the pickups wobble less, it provides better mechanical and acoustic damping.
 

gball

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Historically, Les Pauls used to have heavy duty screening cans around all their electronics. I first started noticing these missing from new Gibsons around the mid-nineties, but I'm not sure when the practice started. The fact that the buzz - which is caused by excessive lengths of unscreened signal wire acting as aerials - diminishes when you touch the guitar indicates that the earth path is fine; there is no earth/grounding issue (well, there may be a problem elsewhere in the circuit knowing Gibson's general sloppy incompetence, but that particular symptom isn't one).

Well, historically speaking they did not have the faraday shields. Take a look in a cavity from a guitar made in the 1950s or 1960s and its exactly the same as today, which is kind of the problem; the shields were added during the Norlin era and work wonderfully on those '70s guitars, however guitar players being guitar players we seem to enjoy looking in the rearview mirror, and even when a demonstrably superior improvement such as a faraday shield was added, or a maple neck substituted for mahogany, or a volute and shallower head angle, we collectively pushed Gibson to stop doing it becuase it wasn't that way in the '50s!

The never-ending and onerous pursuit of guitars that pretend to look/sound/feel like our grandfathers guitars has cost us all a lot of improvements. The Custom Shop used to focus on unique, modern designs. Nowadays its just nothing but a nostalgia mill building "replicas" of the companys own past instead to looking to the future, and unfortunately this trend has taken over the USA line as well, with most of the current models being a '50s this or '60s that and the "modern" line even suffering from stupid fake ABR bridges and nickel hardware on some models.
 
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YodasDad

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When it comes to quality control problems, Fender is just as culpable of overlooking issues that should have been caught during an inspection as Gibson. My 2021 Fender Deluxe (2 humbuckers, 2 volumes, and 2 Tones) had the pots incorrectly installed so that one was always stuck in split mode and the other stuck in humbucker mode. I had to remove the witch hats and make a few adjustments before that was right. Then the setup was bad so I took it to a GC Tech (who is normally very good) and he did his thing and I swear the action wasn't a millimeter better. Almost a year later where the guitar got no love, I took it to a high-end store's tech and he said the frets were too high above the 12th fret so he couldn't lower the action any more than it was (and it was actually higher than when I gave it to him). I cried fowl with GC who cried fowl with Fender and they agreed to make things right in a fashion. I didn't get a new neck, but he took down the frets enough above the 12th fret that now the action is acceptable. It's still nowhere as good as my 73 Tele or my 52 reissue Tele (1982), but at least its a good sounding and playing guitar now.

Also, try a different guitar cable.
 

octavedoctor

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Well, historically speaking they did not have the faraday shields. Take a look in a cavity from a guitar made in the 1950s or 1960s and its exactly the same as today, which is kind of the problem; the shields were added during the Norlin era and work wonderfully on those '70s guitars, however guitar players being guitar players we seem to enjoy looking in the rearview mirror, and even when a demonstrably superior improvement such as a faraday shield was added, or a maple neck substituted for mahogany, or a volute and shallower head angle, we collectively pushed Gibson to stop doing it becuase it wasn't that way in the '50s!

The never-ending and onerous pursuit of guitars that pretend to look/sound/feel like our grandfathers guitars has cost us all a lot of improvements. The Custom Shop used to focus on unique, modern designs. Nowadays its just nothing but a nostalgia mill building "replicas" of the companys own past instead to looking to the future, and unfortunately this trend has taken over the USA line as well, with most of the current models being a '50s this or '60s that and the "modern" line even suffering from stupid fake ABR bridges and nickel hardware on some models.
True, but I'm only 66 so history goes back as far as the 1970s for me...

And, to be fair, in the 50s and 60s interference from fluorescent lighting and computer monitors wasn't as much of a thing then.

However I'm cynical. I don't believe for one moment that it was consumer pressure that led to the current iterations of Gibson abandoning screening; I think it is simply cost cutting, along with a lack of understanding of the importance of it. They may tell you that it's consumer demand, but they aren't afraid of "innovating" elsewhere; like mounting all their pots on a circuit board or fitting robot tuners.

I do appreciate your perspective though; the obsession with "vintage" is something you don't really find anywhere else (except perhaps in the attachment to vinyl in the audiophile community).

I used to share a workshop with an engineer who pointed out that you don't get many people saying "those old 405 line black and white TVs were so much better than these modern Plasma HD things".
 

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