Hurricane Isaias

tjbitt

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OK, for all you tropical storm / hurricane vets, at what point do you put up storm panels?My new house has fitted aluminum panels which are easy to put up and take down. I feel like if I have them I should use them, but don't want to be a douche if the winds just aren't there. Part of my concern is that there are 3 houses across the road to the east of me in various stages of construction with all kinds of construction debris everywhere. Right now they are calling for 75 mph winds depending on how far in or offshore it tracks. Any thoughts as to what point you would batten down? I live in Myrtle about 2 miles from the coast.
Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
 

socialhero

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Hope all goes smoothly as it can for you Rob. :thumb:

Glad it doesn’t sound like it will be worse. I’ve got family in Pinellas I’ve been checking it with.
 

CB91710

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OK, for all you tropical storm / hurricane vets, at what point do you put up storm panels?My new house has fitted aluminum panels which are easy to put up and take down. I feel like if I have them I should use them, but don't want to be a douche if the winds just aren't there. Part of my concern is that there are 3 houses across the road to the east of me in various stages of construction with all kinds of construction debris everywhere. Right now they are calling for 75 mph winds depending on how far in or offshore it tracks. Any thoughts as to what point you would batten down? I live in Myrtle about 2 miles from the coast.
Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
Daughter lives in Jupiter Inlet.
She just put up coverings on the windows of her condo... three floors :shock:
Better safe than sorry.
Construction debris and 75mph wind? I'd not screw around... that can blast a window.
 

Roberteaux

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OK, for all you tropical storm / hurricane vets, at what point do you put up storm panels?My new house has fitted aluminum panels which are easy to put up and take down. I feel like if I have them I should use them, but don't want to be a douche if the winds just aren't there. Part of my concern is that there are 3 houses across the road to the east of me in various stages of construction with all kinds of construction debris everywhere. Right now they are calling for 75 mph winds depending on how far in or offshore it tracks. Any thoughts as to what point you would batten down? I live in Myrtle about 2 miles from the coast.
Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
Don't feel like a dork just for using those storm panels, man. You really do *not* want to have a broken window when the wind is blowing like hell outside.

My thinking goes like this: any time I hear that we're looking at continuous winds of about 50mph or so, I start thinking about storm panels. When they tell me that we're looking at a continuous wind speed of 60mph, those panels are going up, pronto.

I've got my shit set up to where it takes me less than an hour to close up all my windows. Just the peace of mind makes it worth taking the trouble to do that.

You just have to stage things a certain way. You figure how long it takes for the storm to get to you, and try to have the panels up and the job done a good eight or so hours ahead of show time, or earlier if you see it's gonna rain a lot before the storm is actually in proximity (as is often the case). My neighbors usually have theirs panels up 24 hours or more ahead of schedule, but then they sometimes screw themselves when the storm takes an unexpected turn and we don't even get much of anything in our locality... :p

And these storms bear watching, because they are often *very* unpredictable.

Earlier, Redcoats and I were discussing his adventures during Hurricane Jeannie, of 2004. Now that storm gave me a fit because I had to put up my panels twice after stupidly taking them down prematurely the first time.

This was Jeanne's track:

800px-Jeanne_2004_track.png

Hurricane Jeanne, 9/13 - 9/29 2004
As you can see: she bounced off of Haiti and appeared to be going straight north. We were expecting her to turn more northeast, which she did... for a minute... but over the next several hours she ended up describing a 360º turn and then coming straight for Florida.

When I saw her going north and east, I took down those panels. The next morning there I was: putting them back up again! :laugh2:


Here was more fun: Hurricane Wilma in 2005. She was the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Basin and the 2nd most powerful cyclone in the recorded history of the Western Hemisphere:

800px-Wilma_2005_track.png

Hurricane Wilma, 10/16 - 10/27 2005

That storm zig-zagged its way across the Atlantic, kicking butt in a lot of the usual hurricane destinations, and then passed well south of Florida. I watched as it approached the Yucatan Peninsula with a bit of premature relief, thinking it would just auger into Mexico, or at worst might go out over the Gulf and hit pretty much anything from Tallahassee to Corpus Christie. But at least Central Florida would be spared, which was nice seeing as that's where my ass was to be found at that point in time.

But then Wilma-- which as I said was an incredibly fierce storm-- hit the Yucatan Peninsula, and bounced off it like Minnesota Fats making a bank shot. That big-ass storm was now heading straight for Florida! :shock:

Fortunately, when it did hit Florida, it plowed straight across and still remained south of my position. But when it went to the Atlantic, I didn't take my panels down...

I remembered what Jeanne had done the year before! :laugh2:


And then there was Ivan... that's the storm that taught a lot of people that they couldn't even say, "Well, the storm is north of me now... guess it's safe to take the panels down!"

This was Ivan's path:


1024px-Ivan_2004_track.png

Hurricane Ivan 9/2 - 9/29 2004

That Ivan was a rascal... the SOB passed well to the south of us, and out into the Gulf... and I just kept watching. It tore up everything from Milton, Florida, out past about Pensacola and into southern Alabama some... and I just kept watching.

Then it did a HUGE 360º turn and actually came south after breaking back out over the Atlantic from Virginia. It was by this time an extratropical storm, but we kept waiting to see if it would revive into something bigger... and then the sucker started back for Florida. I was shitting Twinkies in astonished rage to see all this...

Another end of the loop, and now Ivan was back out over the Gulf. I was certain that it would turn back into a hurricane, but no: he only revived to the point that he was a tropical storm once again, and then he just dumped a ton of rain on Louisiana.

And then it died.

And THEN I took my storm panels down.

So the point of all this is:

Hurricanes are about as trustworthy as a politician, or a court-appointed attorney. You just have to watch 'em, is all.

But any time they talk about continuous winds over 60, you'd best have your panels in place.

And never mind how it looks to other. "Others" are not the poor bastards who will be paying off for whatever damages you sustain when something comes crashing through your window in the midst of a nasty-ass hurricane.

Best luck in the days to come!

--R :thumb:
 
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Roberteaux

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How in the hell is that even pronounced? Hurricane Isaias. Can't they just give them names like Bob or Sue?
It took me all day to find out for sure, but the name is pronounced as ees-ah-EE-ahs...

This name, "Isaias", is apparently a Spanish-language variation of the Greek name of "Isaiah". And that name, the Greek name, comes from yet another earlier name, which was originally Hebrew.

So now we all know how to say "Isaias". And I'm sure we're all better for it! :laugh2:

Long as I already bumped this thread, I'll mention that Hurricane ees-ah-EE-ahs is currently in the Florida Straits, north of Andros Island, slightly south and rather east of Nassau and Grand Bahama Island.

This is where the storm was expected to pick up a lot of speed and return to status as a Cat 1 hurricane, but at the time of this writing, the system has carried on as a tropical storm-- and hopefully that's as bad as he gets.

I'm also hoping to see the cyclone shift its ground track a bit to the right, to a more directly northerly direction, because I'd love it if this thing stayed out at sea instead of plowing through the state.

But then, I'm sure that the people in Nassau would love for it to take a hard left and plow directly into Fort Lauderdale.

All the way around? At this point I think that chances are excellent that this thing will be just another forgettable non-event.

--R
 

Roberteaux

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WTF?

I've been reading it "eye-SAY-us"

ees-ah-EE-ahs?

WTF is Jar-Jar Binks working for NOAA now?
He always did! :laugh2:

Incidentally: your pronunciation was my pronunciation-- until I was corrected by one of the various articles I've read concerning this particular hurricane.

That's when I learned that I was expected to say the name of the storm as though I were a native speaker of Spanish and had never had an English lesson in my life.

What the deal is there is that that the World Meteorological Organization (which names hurricanes) has decided (in the name of diversity) that this hurricane would have a kind of distinct Spanish top spin going for it.

Ees-ah-EE-ahs! :applause:

Just say it about 85 times, and it gets to where it rolls off the tongue easily, and you seem like you're like, really right with it.

It's like knowing that the L's are silent in "sopapilla ", or that the letter c in "garçon" is silent, and that actually the word means "boy" in French and should not be used to summon your waiter when you're in a French restaurant.

Ees-ah-EE-ahs! :laugh2:

Practice now, thank me later... ;)

--R :p
 

redcoats1976

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have a bunch of puerto rican friends at work and i know/have learned about enough to converse with them on the level of a somewhat backwards 4 year old.love the language and it comes in handy but i doubt i will ever become proficient at it.their english is much better than my spanish...
 

socialhero

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The way this storm’s name is pronounced is as predictable as its path.

NOAA is just adapting to the 21st century. Next time they’ll include pronouns too.
 

Mannish Boy

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Ugh. My place got pounded by Ivan but Opal took the cake. Hit our place on the Panhandle and then produced 60 mph straight line winds at out place in GA. We had thousands of trees down around our GA home.

I use the NOAA site for hurricane info along with the NOAA Data Buoy site. Many of the buoys measure wave height and FYI- Ivan produced at least one 60 foot wave in the Gulf. That is almost unheard of.
 

CB91710

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It's like knowing that the L's are silent in "sopapilla ", or that the letter c in "garçon" is silent, and that actually the word means "boy" in French and should not be used to summon your waiter when you're in a French restaurant.
LOL!

Backyard project when we moved here in the mid 90s.
My flatwork sucks, so I used Mexican pavers.

Everyone at Home Club and my wife were cracking up when I'd ask for "Saltillo" tile

Everyone... and my wife... thought I was joking around with the name :facepalm:
 

KP11520

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How are you doing Robert? I hope all is well and it was mostly a non event!
 

Sp8ctre

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Every time I see a Hurricane watch it makes me very happy that I finally sold my house in Florida last year.

After the complete devastation of Hurricane Michael and the money I had to pour in to repair the house it was
time to get out of that market.

We lived in the house from 1999 through 2005 and went through a few big ones, but nothing like Michael. I
am so happy we had moved away by then.
 

Roberteaux

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How are you doing Robert? I hope all is well and it was mostly a non event!
Thanks, K-- much appreciated! Fine and dandy here! :)

In my locality, the storm was quite literally a non-event. I live somewhere between 50, maybe 60 miles from the area the tropical storm passed over in the Atlantic, and literally couldn't tell that there was a storm anywhere near by.

No wind... not even little puffs, or a mild breeze. Instead, the air just didn't seem to be moving. It was extremely humid, but what else is new? It's Central Florida in August, man... it's always humid and the skies are often heavy during the Dog Days.

The sky was overcast, despite the gibbous moon. You could see where the moon was-- you had a glow there, and occasional flashes of some part of a naked moon. But it was dark, considering the phase of the moon.

It was a beautiful day leading to the big event, which took place at about 2-something AM. It rained once during the day, but was surprisingly sunny despite the partly cloudy nature of the sky.

But, weirdly enough, when TS Isaiah was directly to the east of us, there was no rain. Actually, it was kind of what I'd call a "dead" night, too. Usually the cicadas are raising bloody hell out there, buzzing away. But last night they were quiet.

So that was what it was like to endure TS Isaiah!

I wondered why I bothered to get off my ass to look out my front door. I wondered briefly if the whole thing wasn't just another hoax.

And so I am quite thankful. You know, I might be half-assed used to these storms, but I sure as hell don't like the damned things.

Isaiah is not on my calendar of Most Favorite Tropical Storms-- and it's a hard kind of status to achieve!

--R :thumb:
 

MSB

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didn't do squat here in central NC other than rain off and on yesterday... I'm not complaining though
 

CB91710

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I was watching the radar map as it was passing off the coast of Jupiter.
I was amazed at the lack of rain on land... it was all to the northeast leading edge of the storm, only a few very very light bands to the northwest and lagging.
 
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Soul Tramp

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WELL THANKS A LOT, ROBERT ( @Roberteaux )!!!!!!!!!!!!

Up here in Maine I'm preparing for 60 MPH winds, flooding, and the four horsemen, while you BBQ on the back deck and watch spacehips splash into the ocean.

I think I'll move to Florida so I don't have to deal with hurricanes!
 
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