Hurricane Ian Incoming!

six-string

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
9,358
Reaction score
24,197
I've spent a couple winter holidays on Sanibel just a few years ago. Both times it was great. I don't know if I would call Sanibel "a luxury community" although there are some pricey homes there. Certainly as you travel to the north where you cross a small bridge into Captiva the homes become far more luxurious. There is a nice little village area with a British-style pub called The Mucky Duck and collection of tourist shops, boat rentals, guided tours etc.

The whole place is little more than a sandbar and no doubt the 15 foot storm surge simply washed over the entire place. Some homes are build up on the stilts but there were lots of places at ground level that would have been completely submerged in sea water.

I did read in the news that over 1000 residents were rescued off of Sanibel after the hurricane and that 90% of the homes were damaged. The other thing was that there are lots of alligators and snakes moving around in the debris and creating hazards for rescuers. There is a sizable Nature Reserve in the middle of Sanibel that is full of all sorts of wildlife. I saw all sizes and shapes of alligators, turtles, otters, manatee, birds, lizards, snakes etc. etc. So no surprise they would be floating around the island all free now. Someone told us the inner bay (between the island and the mainland) was also a natural nursery for sharks and rays.
 

Roberteaux

Super Mod
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
34,532
Reaction score
161,329
My one big takeaway (so far) from this storm was to realize that I need to create a long exhaust pipe to port the exhaust gasses from my generator to the outside of the sallyport that the machine would be running within.

I didn't have to use the generator this time around, which was for the better. See, I figured that leaving about one foot of clearance at the top of the plywood shields wired to my iron work would be sufficient to prevent a buildup of carbon monoxide in the sallyport, while also allowing enough atmospheric oxygen to circulate to keep the propane-burning juice box going.

And sure enough, it would! However, while it was raining sideways (because of the wind), I realized that I wouldn't want the generator operating with the amount of rainwater that was able to get into the enclosure. It didn't flood or anything... but I want the generator completely shielded from rainwater. :hmm:

So, I'm going to produce new plywood shields that will only leave about an inch at the very top of the enclosure for air circulation, while also fitting a long exhaust pipe on the generator to port the CO gas outside the sallyport.

Glad I had a test run with Hurricane Ian. Got a couple of other very minor refinements to dial in, out in the yard... but that generator thing simply *has* to be corrected, asap.

--R
 
Last edited:

CB91710

Not Michael Sankar
Double Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
15,731
Reaction score
45,875
My one big takeaway (so far) from this storm was to realize that I need to create a long exhaust pipe to port the exhaust gasses from my generator to the outside of the sallyport that the machine would be running within.

I didn't have to use the generator this time around, which was for the better. See, I figured that leaving about one foot of clearance at the top of the plywood shields wired to my iron work would be sufficient to prevent a buildup of carbon monoxide in the sallyport, while also allowing enough atmospheric oxygen to circulate to keep the propane-burning juice box going.

And sure enough, it would! However, while it was raining sideways (because of the wind), I realized that I wouldn't want the generator operating with the amount of rainwater that was able to get into the enclosure. It didn't flood or anything... but I want the generator completely shielded from rainwater. :hmm:

So, I'm going to produce new plywood shields that will only leave about an inch at the very top of the enclosure for air circulation, while also fitting a long exhaust pipe on the generator to port the CO gas outside the sallyport.

Glad I had a test run with Hurricane Ian. Got a couple of other very minor refinements to dial in, out in the yard... but that generator thing simply *has* to be corrected, asap.

--R
Rainman Ray lost power for a few days.
He didn't want to run his generator full-time, so as soon as the storm passed, he moved his Duramax over to the house (it was shielding his well shed during the storm) and connected it to a pair of invertors, idled the engine up to just over 1000, and let the truck power the house.
Didn't do bad, he used far less Diesel than he would have used gas in the generator and he saved a lot of wear on the generator.

He's planning on installing a 2nd HO alternator. The truck has two batteries and he added a 3rd on the porch, but it was straining and a bit slow to crank.
 

Latest Threads



Top