Hum when volume rolled down

fasthall

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
14
Reaction score
61
I just got my new Les Paul Classic yesterday. It's a beauty (or a beast from another perspective)!

I noticed that when the volume is turned down, the humming noise increased, max at ~8. But when volume is 0 or 10, the noise is gone. At first I thought it's a ground problem. But after some research I think it's normal.
1. The noise goes away if I touch any metal part: string, pickups, bridge, tailpiece, or jack, etc., which actually shows that it's grounded properly.
2. It's brand new guitar with PCB and it seems properly connected. I didn't touch the wiring. I did install humbucker covers, though I did solder the cover to PU.

So I assume this is normal? I just plugged in my Epiphone LP and found the same problem. Funny I didn't notice it in the past few years. It seems there are only two ways to alleviate the problem. The first is to change the 500k pots on classics to 250k. The second one is to shield it, but this classic comes with the PCB and I'm not sure how difficult it is to shield the whole guitar.

I know there are people have this problem, and there are people only use guitar on max volume. My question is is this problem common? especially for those LP with 500k pots? Has anyone done anything mentioned above to solve the problem? Is it worth it? I mean this sound only happens when not playing or playing A11 chord...
 
Last edited:

fasthall

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
14
Reaction score
61
And the hum was just totally gone when using cheap wireless Rx/tx!? What sorcery is that? My cable is GLS and looks in excellent condition. It sounds normal when not humming too.
 

dodona

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
85
inspect the wiring circuit. Somethings wrong there
 

John Nada

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2020
Messages
56
Reaction score
79
That can be many things. Have you tried different parts of the house or different wall outlets? Have you tried it without pedals? I get a lot of hum and noise in my home office, which I don't get in the studio or rehearsal space. I wouldn't change the pots, because it changes the sound of the guitar as well and it probably wouldn't do anything. It can also be something your pickups are picking up. If you're sitting close to a computer for instance.
 

Eugenio

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2016
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Hi,
I think that the guitar tailpiece is not connected to guitar ground... so connect a wire to the tailpiece stud ( to do that you have to dismount the tailpiece stud) and to solder the wire to the nearest body pot).
 

fasthall

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
14
Reaction score
61
inspect the wiring circuit. Somethings wrong there
What am I looking for? They are grounded right. What other things should I check?
That can be many things. Have you tried different parts of the house or different wall outlets? Have you tried it without pedals? I get a lot of hum and noise in my home office, which I don't get in the studio or rehearsal space. I wouldn't change the pots, because it changes the sound of the guitar as well and it probably wouldn't do anything. It can also be something your pickups are picking up. If you're sitting close to a computer for instance.
I was sitting right next to a TV, speaker and console so that could be it. My house is old. I tried another outlet in the same room and still have the same. I'll try different room.
I'm using a Positive Grid modeling amp. Only certain high gain presets give me the noise. If I turn down or disable overdrive pedal there's no hum at all.
Hi,
I think that the guitar tailpiece is not connected to guitar ground... so connect a wire to the tailpiece stud ( to do that you have to dismount the tailpiece stud) and to solder the wire to the nearest body pot).
I'll check it, but when I touch the tailpiece the hum is gone, doesn't that mean it's grounded? Or just that tailpiece is connected to the bridge through strings?
 
Last edited:

Eugenio

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2016
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Hi,
I think that is your hand and your body to discharge to heart.
I had the same issue. When I touched the metal jack cover the problem was gone.
I had the same issue with volume pots but not with tone pots... and Ithink that for you is the same thing.
The internal electronics of the guitar , regarding the guitar ground, must be an open loop. This means that the two volume pots ground, are not grounded togheter. Also for your safety the tailpiece must be grounded. I advice it.
 

budg

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
2,851
Reaction score
2,079
I had a similar problem with a Classic . Mine was more static related though. I could hear static when my hand slid up and down the neck. All the wiring was ok. I ended up shielding my control cavity and selector swithch cavity with copper tape and the problem disappeared.
 

Classicplayer

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2007
Messages
2,710
Reaction score
1,789
Shielding can help a bit, but I had a 2010 Les Paul Studio with a similar persistent hum from the 500k volumes, and shielding did not eliminate all of it. I think some hum is considered fairly normal by many Les Paul owners. It is worse in some guitars though! If you can't abide with it and think it's too much hum, have a tech examine the wiring.

My current 2 Lesters also have some hum when turning volumes down. One guitar only lets me go to about 7.5 on the volumes, while the new one lets me go down to just below 9 on the volumes before I notice some hum. I have read and would like confirmation on it; that volume controls act as a voltage divider which cause this hum situation. I would like an electronics tech explain to me what that means and (electrical) what it can cause.


Classicplayer
 

fasthall

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
14
Reaction score
61
I appreciate all of your replies. The more search I've done convinced me this is normal for the facts that I live in an old house with many electrics in the room. The hardwares seem to be grounded properly but I ordered a multimeter to test it and the outlet.

Well the humming gets loud only when using high gain and overdrive anyway. I'm now using a wireless transmitter and I can't hear the hum, so I'll leave it as it be.
 

Classicplayer

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2007
Messages
2,710
Reaction score
1,789
If you use amps with lots of gain and have the gain up high enough, you will hum and possibly white noise. Some amps are better than others with the levels of hum. In a loud band with other instruments, it might not be noticeabl, until the stage goes quiet between songs.

Classicplayer
 

Red_Label

Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2017
Messages
59
Reaction score
102
I appreciate all of your replies. The more search I've done convinced me this is normal for the facts that I live in an old house with many electrics in the room. The hardwares seem to be grounded properly but I ordered a multimeter to test it and the outlet.

Well the humming gets loud only when using high gain and overdrive anyway. I'm now using a wireless transmitter and I can't hear the hum, so I'll leave it as it be.

I have the same issue with my various LPs, and live in an older house with crappy wiring. I don't experience the issue with my various strats. I just accept it because I have no clue how to solve the issue.
 

moreles

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2011
Messages
4,254
Reaction score
2,983
Sorry to hear about the hum. It could be anything mentioned here, or even something else, so I won't add to the list. Bottom line = it's not right; you should not have hum in your signal. If you only play in a certain volume range, etc., and it's truly inaudible then, you might choose to ignore it, but then you're vulnerable should you end up playing in a different context where the hum might become audible. I like my stuff to have a clear signal at both pushed volume and when playing quietly, miked, in settings where I need dead quite between lines. For some people, a noisy rig is no problem because of where/how they play. Up to you. Chasing hum can be maddening, but it's do-able.
 

cybermgk

Singin' the body lectric
Premium Member
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2011
Messages
14,493
Reaction score
20,226
when you touch it, and the hum goes away, it i because YOU are being the ground, that is not there.
 

fasthall

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
14
Reaction score
61
I checked the electronics and outlet with multimeter. They are all grounded properly, so I think it's either EMI or amp. It doesn't bother me though so that concludes the hum chasing.

I posted some photos in this post.
 

kenmarkat

Senior Member
Joined
May 11, 2012
Messages
279
Reaction score
178
Not sure it's this but just a thought - I use a Fender Mustang Floor pedal when gigging, and no matter what guitar I'm using through it some of the high gain/distortion patches hum like crazy unless I have the volume pedal all the way down or palm mute all the strings. Almost all patches are totally silent but some are really noisy no matter what I'm doing if the volume is up and I leave the strings open. When you say it disappears when you choose sounds that are not high gain/high distortion I'm wondering if it's just the nature of the patches themselves. Your guitar might be fine. I'm not a techie, just sharing what I found in my own experience.
 


Latest Threads



Top