How to neatly set up pedalboard?

Arthur

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Hey guys,
Might seem like a dumb question but how have you guys set up your pedalboards so neatly? Mine has patch cables and power cables from my power supply everywhere and it look like a mess...also does anybody have any tips for how to mount a power supply under a pedal board without the bracket? I've tried with velcro but gravity eventually catches up..
 

AlanH

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I don't know about your power supply but, if you don't already do so, use patch connectors rather than patch cables to keep things neat. I use the gold offset ones so I get minimal noise and can line most pedals up as I want them.
 

kboman

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Briefly, some starting points that I use myself:

1. Lay out the pedals in a way that makes sense in terms of user interface, ie often switched and tap tempo pedals in the front and the always-on or once-per-set flavours at the back
2. Connect power cabling. Use zip-ties to keep things neat
3. Connect audio cabling. I suggest making your own patch leads so they are an appropriate length
4. The PSU can in some cases be attached with zip-ties too, that's how I do it
 

rjshare

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Depends a lot on your specific board I think, but the first step is really working out your layout. I make my own cables so once I had the physical layout sorted with the best pedal order for me, I made all my leads to exactly the right length so there was no unnecessary loops of cable getting in the way etc

Contrary to what alan says in post #2 (sorry!) I absolutely wouldn't use connectors rather than cables as a lot of pedals don't have their jacks aligned perfectly perpendicularly to the floor so the connectors tend to stress the jacks and can cause damage to the pedal/jack/pcb.

Cable ties are definitely the way to go in terms of keeping the whole lot tidy and attaching the power unit.
 

scrumm21

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I absolutely wouldn't use connectors rather than cables as a lot of pedals don't have their jacks aligned perfectly perpendicularly to the floor so the connectors tend to stress the jacks and can cause damage to the pedal/jack/pcb.

Hmmm...I use the "offset" connectors mentioned by Alan H.....which allows pedals with off-set Jack plugs to be connected without any stress to the pedal\ jack \ pcb.
Actually I use Straightline connectors between pedals with aligned plug holes and the Offset connectors between pedals with mis-aligned plug holes, and All pedals sit perfectly flat on the board with no wobble\play at all.
....And it Is so much neater....
 

Arthur

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Thanks for all that guys, and yeah with zip ties though how do you actually use them :laugh2: sorry for being so naive..but when I see other guys' pedalboards I don't see any zip ties could one of you perhaps post a photo?
 

Marshall & Moonshine

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Making your own cables is really the key. It costs less in the long run, and it's not that hard. They make solderless cable kits, but I always solder.
As said before, lay them out how you want them, and cut the cables accordingly.
 

rjshare

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Hmmm...I use the "offset" connectors mentioned by Alan H.....which allows pedals with off-set Jack plugs to be connected without any stress to the pedal\ jack \ pcb.
Actually I use Straightline connectors between pedals with aligned plug holes and the Offset connectors between pedals with mis-aligned plug holes, and All pedals sit perfectly flat on the board with no wobble\play at all.
....And it Is so much neater....

Your gear, your pedals etc but this guy knows pedals:

http://stinkfoot.se/archives/1345

This is the problem:

coupler_arc.jpg
 

SWeAT hOg

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Making your own cables is really the key. It costs less in the long run, and it's not that hard. They make solderless cable kits, but I always solder.
As said before, lay them out how you want them, and cut the cables accordingly.





I made my own patches out of an old instrument cable.

That board is gorgeous, pengy. Loop strip of some sort would look sweet there. :naughty:

I agree that making your own cables is a handy trick. I just cleaned up my board and would like to make a couple new cables to replace a few that are either too long, or one I stretched so far, I'm surprised I didn't short it. I know, if it aint broke...., but sometimes I look at my board as a scab that needs to be picked.

With all the dead cables I pile up from my Rock program, I should be able to build enough cables for the Edge. No exaggeration, I must have at least 200 metres in buggered cables. I have nowhere to buy right angle plugs locally, but I have an order coming in from Hong Kong.
 

penguinchit

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That board is gorgeous, pengy. Loop strip of some sort would look sweet there. :naughty:

I agree that making your own cables is a handy trick. I just cleaned up my board and would like to make a couple new cables to replace a few that are either too long, or one I stretched so far, I'm surprised I didn't short it. I know, if it aint broke...., but sometimes I look at my board as a scab that needs to be picked.

With all the dead cables I pile up from my Rock program, I should be able to build enough cables for the Edge. No exaggeration, I must have at least 200 metres in buggered cables. I have nowhere to buy right angle plugs locally, but I have an order coming in from Hong Kong.

Thanks! I am pretty proud of it. After seeing your loop switch explanation, I could see myself investing in one of those...
 

SWeAT hOg

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Thanks! I am pretty proud of it. After seeing your loop switch explanation, I could see myself investing in one of those...

Your board looks great! Mine is made of skag material from old kitchen cupboards. Skag tone! (great f*ckin' band name, BTW. DIBS!)

This is the guy who built mine. I bought it used, but loop-master is the builder. I bought a single-channel looper from him as well. For less than $100, you can buy up to a 7 ch. strip, nothing to lose here and it makes a board so neat and organized. The BOSS one looks great, but the price is steep by comparison to loop-master.

http://www.loop-master.com/specials.php?page=1
 

Marshall & Moonshine

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That board is gorgeous, pengy. Loop strip of some sort would look sweet there. :naughty:

I agree that making your own cables is a handy trick. I just cleaned up my board and would like to make a couple new cables to replace a few that are either too long, or one I stretched so far, I'm surprised I didn't short it. I know, if it aint broke...., but sometimes I look at my board as a scab that needs to be picked.

With all the dead cables I pile up from my Rock program, I should be able to build enough cables for the Edge. No exaggeration, I must have at least 200 metres in buggered cables. I have nowhere to buy right angle plugs locally, but I have an order coming in from Hong Kong.

And I don't mean to say it can ONLY be done with "roll your own" cabling. About half of my monster board (attempt) was done with purchased patch cords of varying supplies. But I found I had to move the pedals to the cords, at times, and they tended to be bulkier than the pancakes I was making up. Being able to set it up how you like and build the cords....well.....accordingly (wakka wakka wakka!!!), it makes it a lot easier than ordering a few 6", some 12" and the occasional 18" cords online and hoping you got it right. I see that as the MAIN advantage to buying a small roll and some connectors. I think I spent about $30-40 on the whole thing, and have connectors left over, and they can be changed later or re-used.
Anyway, it's just one way to do it, and after 25yrs playing, I just started doing this about a year ago, so take that for what it's worth. ;)
 

SWeAT hOg

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And I don't mean to say it can ONLY be done with "roll your own" cabling. About half of my monster board (attempt) was done with purchased patch cords of varying supplies. But I found I had to move the pedals to the cords, at times, and they tended to be bulkier than the pancakes I was making up. Being able to set it up how you like and build the cords....well.....accordingly (wakka wakka wakka!!!), it makes it a lot easier than ordering a few 6", some 12" and the occasional 18" cords online and hoping you got it right. I see that as the MAIN advantage to buying a small roll and some connectors. I think I spent about $30-40 on the whole thing, and have connectors left over, and they can be changed later or re-used.
Anyway, it's just one way to do it, and after 25yrs playing, I just started doing this about a year ago, so take that for what it's worth. ;)

Price is certainly always a consideration. You mentioned solderless plugs earlier. I estimate I'd need 34 of them, just to set up my board as is.

F that, I'm glad my daddy taught me to solder a joint. Rolling my own keeps me out of the neighbourhood and out of trouble. Plus, I get to sound all f*ckin' pretentious around here. Win all around. :D
 

nitrodave08

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