How Safe is Flying?

Publius pro tem

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You're fooling yourself on that point.
Clear-air turbulence has killed several people on jets - both private and commercial.
The plane survived to land, but unrestrained passengers or crew did not.

Some ugly stories told by the witnesses in the plane with them - watching them get slammed around. :wow:

As a result, I keep my belt on all the time.
I loosen it after the sign goes off, but I keep it on while in my seat.

When they say to buckle up - do it!


.
 

brandoniusrex

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I just dont worry about it.
And, so far, havent figured out how to drive to Hawaii :hmm: :laugh2:

Seriously, I fly quite often, and, just something I dont feel
the need to worry about. I figure if I had to drive (lets say the 2000 miles from LA to Mo.) I'd have a better chance getting into a car accident.

But, I'd also have a hell of alot better chance surviving the car accident :shock:

shit..thanks alot :laugh2::laugh2:

I actually just read a couple days ago that in a plane crash, as long as you are in a good position (like in the back near an exit), the survival rates are *unbelievably* high.
 

Thumpalumpacus

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That wasn't a funny episode, at the time. Still isn't, really, just camp. Wasn't even camp at the time.

Sorry, it just struck me that way. I was pretty nervous. Come to think of it, I think that's the last time I flew on a DC-10. Not by design, but they were fiercely criticized in the aftermath.
 

AngryHatter

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I'm the exact same way, I fly all the time, but I don't dig it. My mom worked for American Airlines, so I flew everywhere all the time growing up, and when I was a kid I loved it but the older I got the less I dug it. About ten years ago I was on a flight getting ready to depart and the pilot comes on the intercom and says "Well, we had some trouble getting the engines started, but there's an old trick on the books that the mechanics approved so we're gonna try it."...and I literally strated to freak out inside my head, I'm thinking "Ok, they're gonna "jumpstart" the plane, and then after we're in the air and the engine dies what the hell are they gonna do?" But, luckily I was sitting in the very back of the plane, so I studied the faces of the flight attendants while they were buckling up, and none of them looked even the least bit concerned, so I figured, these people arent idiots, they don't wanna die anymore than I do, so if they're not worried, I'm not worried lol.

Engine conking out is not as worrisome as a structural failure or pilot error.
Been on aircraft that ran out of fuel. The landing took place within 3 or 4 miles of the intended destination.
Ever ask a paramedic if he could just drop you at the Raytheon building?
And you know when the pilot had his birthday we had a little plastic gas can as a present.
 

Publius pro tem

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I actually just read a couple days ago that in a plane crash, as long as you are in a good position (like in the back near an exit), the survival rates are *unbelievably* high.
I try for the over-wing exit row if at all possible - for the room as much as the head start for evacuation.
If not, I get a seat all the way at the back.

Several reasons for this.
1. You meet the cabin crew and dead-heading pilots.
2. Even if everybody survived a bad landing or big boo-boo, there's still a matter of getting off the plane.
3. People usually go off the way they came on in a bad situation.
At the rear, I'm two big steps from exit doors most people never think of... :wave:

I usually wear cotton too - but it's 100% when I'm flying.
 

River

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Sorry, it just struck me that way. I was pretty nervous. Come to think of it, I think that's the last time I flew on a DC-10. Not by design, but they were fiercely criticized in the aftermath.
No apology necessary. I see how it was easily taken that way. But I meant it the other way. I saw that episode "live" when I was 8. Hadn't flown yet, but on some non-documentable level, I got at least two or three of the messages it conveyed. Among them: Mental illness can cause irrational fear and, conversely, justifiable fear can cause mental illness (or what others perceive as such). Powerful stuff.

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Let's not even discuss "The Outer Limits" and tumbleweeds. :shock:
 

KSG_Standard

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Mine was coming into DFW from Longview, December, 1978. I don't think it had that many people aboard, it couldn't carry that many, but we were taking hops and drops forty feet at a pop. I remember it because as the weather got worse, the pilot had to fly lower ... he was "navigating" by following I-20. :shock:

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBvWoT_s-R8]Crazy Plane Ride - YouTube[/ame]
 

Tone deaf

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I've flown over 1 million air miles, had 4 or 5 emergency landings (dumping fuel, etc). Every time there has been an issue, the pros up front have gotten up on the ground, safely. I've seen a couple of hostesses hit the ceiling in turbulence. Nothing like coming into land on a perfectly still, smoking hot day.
 

Thumpalumpacus

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I try for the over-wing exit row if at all possible - for the room as much as the head start for evacuation.
If not, I get a seat all the way at the back.

Several reasons for this.
1. You meet the cabin crew and dead-heading pilots.
2. Even if everybody survived a bad landing or big boo-boo, there's still a amtter of getting off the plane.
3. People usually go off the way they came on in a bad situation.
At the rear, I'm two big steps from exit doors most people never think of... :wave:

I usually wear cotton too - but it's 100% when I'm flying.

I'm with you, I like being near my doors. And I study them, too. But I still try to get in the last couple of rows, for safety and convenience both. (The safety part is pretty small -- less crowding at the extreme end, and the front is more likely to absorb the brunt of the impact energy -- it may not help much, but in a bad place like a crash, I want every goddamned thing on my side.)
 

Gin&Pentatonic

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I was going to reply with something along the lines of "flying is very safe". But lately after hearing, what seems like, a new story every week about a passenger, flight attendant, and even pilots completely losing their **** and screaming about terrorists and having to be subdued by other passengers, I'm not so sure how to respond. There are definitely potential risks when flying, but it seems like mechanical issues are the least of your worries. It's the other idiots and pyschopaths sitting in the seats next to you that make flying dangerous.
 

RobertF

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Most people hate the idea of turbulence... me on the other hand, i quite like it. It's quite fun actually... because i know that turbulence will never do any harm./QUOTE]


You should check out the story of BOAC flight 911, a Boeing 707 that was broken up by clear air turbulence over Mt. Fiji, Japan in 1966.
 

kmk108

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I almost puked from turbulence while landing in Beijing last year. This year, multiple people DID puke on the landing in Beijing :laugh2: Even if it's normal, I don't like the feeling of turbulence, when it's more than a little shaking. The instant drops/raises don't do my stomach any good.

I used to get nervous on flights, but after flying to China twice and being on numerous other flights, getting through security bugs me more than the flights.
 

Phoenix59

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Seriously, I fly quite often, and, just something I dont feel the need to worry about. I figure if I had to drive (lets say the 2000 miles from LA to Mo.) I'd have a better chance getting into a car accident.

But, I'd also have a hell of alot better chance surviving the car accident :shock:

Depends...

14012008028.jpg
 

Sinster

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I always wear cotton as well, my wife and kids know to wear cotton.. Since I'm high on the food chain with AA and USAir freq flying programs. I'm always in the emergency exit row when I'm not in first class. When I'm in first class I know how many seats between me and the exit behind me. Most likely when I'm in first class I will be the first to go if the aircraft decides to hit the ground. My seat belt never comes off even if the "seat belt" sign is off. I also check to see how many fat f**kers are between me and my egress.

For those who don't know the reason why you have to put your seats and tray tables ups during take off and landing. If they were down and you had to leave the aircraft in a hurry, they become obstacles on your way out in case there was an emergency. Every seconds counts.
 

River

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When they say to buckle up - do it!
I buckle up even when they don't say to do it. Low and tight across my lap, to the point of feeling constipated.

I've seen too much not to.

And I cringe when I see all of those 50+ pound backpacks going into the overhead, 'cause I've seen them come out and do serious bodily damage to folks who packed right. If I had my way, we'd be using the overheads for extra flotation, not international gold bullion shipments.
 

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