How much should I pay for this '08 Standard w/ broken headstock?

Cory

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That’s a big no for me - he literally would have to be giving it away - horrible attempt at repairing it - who knows if it will even hold up in the long run?
 

Cory

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It looks solid. It's not a complicated glue-up. I'll bet it will hold just fine.
I guess I meant more from an aesthetics perspective that it wasn’t the best attempt, which would lead me to question his overall ability - not something I’d be willing to take the financial risk on
 

Steven

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That guitar is in terrible condition, I would not want it.
 

UncleFluffy

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From an effort standpoint, he's not put a huge amount into the repair. If he's just looking at recouping his repair costs, I'd offer him $300 and see what his reaction is. If you end up missing out, better think of putting the money into a nicer looking headstock repair.
 

Adinol

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Hello! So a local luthier (and a great one) is looking to sell an '08 Gibson Les Paul Standard with a broken headstock....
...he did all the repair work.
Those repairs don't look like the work of a great luthier.
 

Adinol

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That’s not just a broken headstock. $800 tops
That's not just a broken headstock. That's a botched up headstock repair.

When a customer brings me a guitar with a clean break, the repair is $200 to $300. When it's a previously botched repair, my repair cost starts at around $600.

Here is one previous botched repair that I am currently repairing...

DSCN7033.jpeg

As you can see, I had to remove some of the wood and replace it with a patch of fresh mahogany. The previous glue joint failed and I could not just reglue it, and call it good, because wrong glue was used and the wood fibers were contaminated. So, after I reglued the failed glue joint I had to remove as much wood from the back as possible and make a patch to reinforce the weak area. The customer wants me to spray it with black so I was not concerned about finding a piece that matches in color 100%.

Here is another previous botched repair that I am soon going to be repairing...

DSCN6867.jpeg


My advice: don't buy a guitar with a questionable headstock repair .

Also don't buy a guitar with a broken headstock, unless you know how to repair it (meaning that you've done it a few times before, with success). The only exception would be, if you already have a quote from a luthier that you know well, who's seen the guitar (line, not just on photos) and who can guarantee the repair at a fixed price and whose previous headstock repairs you've seen.
 
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Dilver

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You mention the neck/heel area looks rough AND there’s that damage on the top by the neck. Are you sure the neck wasn’t removed at some point? I’d pass, but if you’re really interested, post more pics. - hard to place a value when all we see is two close ups…
 

Adinol

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It looks solid. It's not a complicated glue-up. I'll bet it will hold just fine.
If wrong glue was used, if it was not clamped right, if not enough glue was used, etc... the glue joint is likely to fail. At that time it is a more involved repair than the initial repair would have been.

I've see it many times working in a busy repair shop where people bring all sorts of things.
 
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