How much is “just in our heads” ?

goldtop0

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Well........... if you drop the new ones on the floor they go 'plunk' and if you drop the old ones on the floor they go 'plink'..........:hmm:

More so for me is old recordings of a LP through a Marshall('60s) versus more recent recordings since then........it's all subjective.............. up to a point.
 

jeggz

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Well........... if you drop the new ones on the floor they go 'plunk' and if you drop the old ones on the floor they go 'plink'..........:hmm:

More so for me is old recordings of a LP through a Marshall('60s) versus more recent recordings since then........it's all subjective.............. up to a point.
Actually, it seems to be the reverse.

The new ones would be plink and the originals would be plunk.
 

Liam

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My '57 LP Special came with some 3-a-side repro tuners, with string holes a bit big, meaning the sharp angle caused excessive high E breakages. So a few months back I bought a set of aged repros that I know work well. Took the crappy repros off, and fitted, wait for it...

a set of mid 50s originals I had kicking around :rofl:. Holds tune better, looks better (withered buttons, man there's some tone mojo in those!), sounds better, is better. I know it's all in my head, and I simply don't care.

Might be in your head too, but if it feels right, it is right.

Liam
 

jeggz

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One of them has almost no resistance though, I remember there was an easy fix to that, but I don’t remember what it was.
 

jeggz

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My '57 LP Special came with some 3-a-side repro tuners, with string holes a bit big, meaning the sharp angle caused excessive high E breakages. So a few months back I bought a set of aged repros that I know work well. Took the crappy repros off, and fitted, wait for it...

a set of mid 50s originals I had kicking around :rofl:. Holds tune better, looks better (withered buttons, man there's some tone mojo in those!), sounds better, is better. I know it's all in my head, and I simply don't care.

Might be in your head too, but if it feels right, it is right.

Liam
Agreed.
 

goldtop0

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I bet you the gold ones are better........and have a more Christmasy tone to 'em ;)
 

judson

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funny as i was i thinking the same thing this morning after finally getting a 1965 Gibson Melody Maker husk filled with some parts to get it playable to see how its sounds........and after playing for awhile, i was pleased how great it feels and sounds.....

and i think , its gotta be the wood, as majority of parts are new .....but with the past 3 or 4 husks, all from the early 60's , one from early 80's...one 59' (not gibson) they sounded great so i was convinced...yeah its the wood.....as most of the parts are usually new.

but then a few weeks back read this post which duane put all vintage parts into a recent R9 and his results made sense to me as well, as the parts matter more than my thought about old wood with newer parts....sooooooooo wtf ???

I got no clue but maybe why some vintage guitars with original parts sound so good......

so really i think with the vintage parts in a 2018 R9 , i would agree its mostly the parts but an R9 isnt any chibson so there some reasoning there .....

below is a good read if you got this far..

 
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d1m1

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The nylon bushings as Eric mentioned and maybe something with the setup of the guitar (the neck moves while changing strings; different string tension and high, affect tone): And of course the new strings sound better as well.
 

jeggz

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The nylon bushings as Eric mentioned and maybe something with the setup of the guitar (the neck moves while changing strings; different string tension and high, affect tone): And of course the new strings sound better as well.
I did this very scientifically:

Removed / replaced each tuner one at a time, using the same strings.

So there’s that.
 

Liam

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One of them has almost no resistance though, I remember there was an easy fix to that, but I don’t remember what it was.
I have occasionally needed to push the back cover on a little more firmly and deform the tab that secures it a little more to keep them tight. I did notice I'd made a pretty thorough job of this on the original 3-a-side set I put on my old LP Special. They work perfectly.

Liam
 

jeggz

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If you drop Grovers onto a Les Paul they go All Right Now for Free ...
I actually like Grovers, but being this one was never drilled, I’m gonna leave it that way for now.

The other one has the Grovers anyways.
 

treatb

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could be the fit to the wood, metallurgy...etc. different metal resonates differently. also how the fit is in the tuner holes can impact the resonance to the neck. doesn't mean its all in your head.
 


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