How much does "sanding" affect the value of vintage guitars?

BlackForestSociety

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Hey guys, hope all is well.

I am currently interested in buying a vintage Fender Precision or jazz bass.

One is a 1959 p-bass, the original finish was sanded down, unfortunately they sanded down so much that the body is a little bit thinner than it would have been originally. Some filled screw holes on the back of the body. No original pickguard and no case. Otherwise original.

The other one is a 1963 jazz bass, was original candy apple red with matching Headstock, body refin in car and new tuners. Also no case, otherwise original.

What are the market prices for these right now, what would be a fair price for both sides?

Regards

Ben
 

hbucker

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While I don't know real $$ numbers to tell you. I can say that this effects the collectible value significantly. Almost to the point that it's just an old instrument now. Refinishing vintage guitars always reduces the collectible value. In this case, it sounds like it wasn't even done by someone who necessarily knew what they were doing, so that would hurt it even more.

If your interest is unquenchable, I would recommend buying it - assuming the price is acceptable for you - and using it as a player. Don't buy it as a vintage guitar investment. In this context it's the best of both worlds. You literally have a vintage instrument and all of the practical reasons people love these instruments, without having to pay the vintage/collectible price.

I don't suspect that the slightly thinner body (why would they sand it that much??) will have a noticeable (or any?) effect on the tone.
 

Uncle Vinnie

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That kind of modding kills collector value and the price should reflect it. Either one I wouldn't pay a dime more than $4k … if that. If seller balks, then walk and tell him god luck getting $6-$8k
 

judson

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i bought a 71 deluxe with a pencil thin neck that was sanded and back was sanded at least an 1/8th of an inch as the control and switch cavity covers actually sit out a bit,


got it for a good price and it plays great,...never will be a collectable but i like it!
 

lpfan1980

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Sanding or refinishing a vintage fiddle brings the price down by a fair chunk good news they become more affordable for the rest of us-although still pricy. There was a 1964 Fender Strat that had been painted a modern electric blue in the 80s.That dropped its price down to a slim trim 14000 :rofl: gorgeous guitar regardless.
 

Mark_the_Knife

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Let's assume a mint guitar can sell for $10,000 at retail.

Here's how refinishing affects prices. When you present such an instrument to a dealer, you already take a 40% haircut off the retail price, and another 50% due to the refin. This means he offers you $3000.

When you enter the dealer's store as a buyer, the selling price goes back to $6000. The 50% devaluation rule does not apply to dealer prices. Some will try to convince you that a neck break is no big deal- it gives the guitar character.

You cannot win, as a buyer or seller.
 


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