How important is the word "Gibson" on your headstock.

Maxturbo27

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
43
Reaction score
20
The matter here is that he's not asking if you'd prefer a Gibson than a better another brand or no-branded guitar, he's asking that if you had the chance (it doesn't matter a damn if it's possible or not), to buy a GENUINE Gibson without a logo for 25% less, you'd take it, or you'd pay more because the logo is just that important.

It's a really simple thread.
 

moncrete

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2012
Messages
299
Reaction score
168
well, see "gibson" on my headstock is like see logos hrc or honda on my cr (years ago)... :
"gibson" makes me feel good, i see it and i think to his legend... it something magic...

but if i find a lp like i look for, it ain't important...
 

dspelman

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2009
Messages
11,913
Reaction score
8,814
I’m a die-hard, narrow minded, one-eyed traditionalist who only cares about Gibson (and Fender).
I know and understand there are Les Paul copies and Les Paul style guitars that have technical improvements compared to Gibson Les Paul models. I don’t care.
I know and understand that, arguably, other companies have better QC. I don’t care.
I don’t care what anyone thinks.

"Middle Age is when your Broad Mind changes places with your Narrow Waist."
"Don't confuse me with the Facts."
"I want what I want when I want it."
"I would say that it isn't set in stone, but it is."

I was tempted to add in something about Red and Blue States (oops, political) and maybe even banjo players in backwoods country but honestly, there's something charming about both blind obedience and blind loyalty. It's right in there with unconditional love. You always know where those folks stand.

How do you feel about Chivvy vs. Ford?
 

patsanger

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
473
Reaction score
336
If the argument really is - would you buy a true Gibson without the logo... IMHO maybe. As long as I could document that it was a true gibson (resale does come into it here for me).

Now, that said I just used the fact that a guitar I just bought has a cracked and fragmented logo on it to help with my negotiations. :naughty:
 

voggin

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
773
Reaction score
771
"Middle Age is when your Broad Mind changes places with your Narrow Waist."
"Don't confuse me with the Facts."
"I want what I want when I want it."
"I would say that it isn't set in stone, but it is."

I was tempted to add in something about Red and Blue States (oops, political) and maybe even banjo players in backwoods country but honestly, there's something charming about both blind obedience and blind loyalty. It's right in there with unconditional love. You always know where those folks stand.

How do you feel about Chivvy vs. Ford?

It is kinda cool, isn't it, the devotion Gibson inspires. Even the people who complain about the company on places like this seem to do so more out of a sense of "We must save Gibson" than a dislike of the products. I mean, really, how many other companies do you even know the name of the CEO, let alone have strong opinions about him? Quick, name 10 CEO's of ANY companies!!

This is probably completely off topic, but I remember once in the mid 80s in the heart of the superstrat/floyd rose era, when me and my pals were into Charvels and the like and had little time for "old man guitars", when our local store brought in a beautiful Custom. We all stared at it, like it was a holy relic, even though it had none of the features any of us wanted in a guitar. That's powerful history/branding/whatever.
 

ktj

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2011
Messages
260
Reaction score
180
I may have seen a similar response elsewhere in the thread, however for me, it meant accomplishment. While I love cars, I now that my skillsets, drive and mindset don't lend well to ever owning a Ferrari, Lamborghini, Aston Martin, Audi and Lotus. From the first time I saw the "Sweet Child O'Mine" video, I wanted a Gibson Les Paul.
I fully acknowledge that I have no musical talent (I didn't get musical talent but got to keep a full head of hair - you guys can decide if the trade off is worth it, but its what I got).
Achieving a certain level of career success that allowed me to buy one - knowing it wouldn't affect me long term financially (though it was a wedding gift from my wife, we had been together too long to differentiate mine/ yours) was a truly good feeling. Yes, I got the trad faded - and sounds incredibly amazong - but it did have the all important, to me, words "Gibson Les Paul."
To me it is not only an accomplishment, but a piece of art and a legacy. It is to be my first born daughter's when she is able to appreciate it/play it or I die. I do want her to be a drummer though. :)
I treat guitars as "object d'arts" and hope to have a few on my wall. But any Les Paul, aside from my Hondo Les Paul copy that my parents bought me years ago, will have Gibson on the headstock.
Cheers
K
PS to those who think I'm a d'bag for this view, understood, but I could give a rats arse what you think.
 

Mysicman

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Messages
289
Reaction score
533
The elitist attitude is present in all hobbies & endeavors...this is why every company that manufactures luxury items continues to come out with the latest limited edition that we "just have to have!". Some people are drawn to these marketing techniques or are collectors. I don't dislike or judge those that have the means to have the nicer/more desirable things but I will judge you on how you present yourself. And by elitist attitude I mean those that have something nice and look down their noses at those who they perceive to have something inferior.

Coming from the car hobby does the young guy working on a clapped out car have less of an opinion than the retired guy who just purchased a new Shelby? As long as both are cool I'm fine. If the kid gets bent out of joint because the old guy doesn't work on his car or conversely the Shelby guy thinks his shit don't stink because he has a Shelby then there's a problem. Find where you fit and feel comfortable and just have fun. I always gravitate towards the more grass roots "down to earth" types regardless of what they drove, because that's where I fit.

I had an epi tribute plus which was a beautiful guitar and sounded great but the neck was the 60's slim taper and made my hand cramp. Otherwise I was proud and happy to play her. When a good friend found his dream guitar the chance came to pick up his Studio, a guitar that felt good, sounded good, and had a sentimental attachment for me. Coincidentally the guitar he picked up was a Gibson Les Paul Traditional in a very specific color and specs that was hard to find where we live. He had previously satisfied his Fender needs with an American strat. The interesting thing is for him the MIM, Studio, and copies he has are/were never going to satisfy him. He is a collector and always looking to "move up" and I don't say that in a derogatory way, it's just what makes him tick. Me on the other hand, I'm very happy with my Studio. The cool thing is when we get together it works because we are into the same types of music and on the same page.

It is interesting that a good player can make a crappy guitar sound great but a crappy player (me) can't make a good guitar sound great :) A couple of my friends can make my $100 camp guitar sound almost as good as my Taylor and the Epi and Gibson were indistinguishable. I ended up with a couple of guitars that make me smile and feel good (for lots of reasons) and for once I'm on a journey with no timeline or completion dates...I'll probably always suck but I sure am havin' fun!

Just some ramblings from a middle age guy :)

Cheers
Mike

P.S. Lots of great members on here with a variety of opinions which is what makes things interesting. If we all agreed and held the same things to be true what would we have to talk about? I don't know about anyone else but I'm not here for a circle jerk :)
 

jc2000

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2013
Messages
6,915
Reaction score
3,862
I agree, it's what the name represents. I've had quite a few motorcycles over the years and nothing feels as good as my Harley! I have a few electric guitars also and none of them have the feel or tone of my LP. So there must be something to the name. Yeh, I think I'll keep the name on my guitar....
 

Couldn'tStandTheWeather

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
1,033
Reaction score
673
Well, if I have a Gibson, then it should say "Gibson" on the headstock.

If I have a Fender, then it should say "Fender" up there.

And so on....
 

Steinmetzify

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2011
Messages
3,159
Reaction score
3,508
Not at all.....I have a seriously great LP that doesn't say Gibson on it. I've had Gibsons, but got around to the idea that a great guitar is a great guitar, no matter what the headstock says. That being said, some of the best guitars I've ever played happened to say Gibson and Fender on them.
 

LenPaul

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
2,994
Reaction score
4,305
It matters to me, if it didn't I'd sand if off & put my name on it.
 

upl8tr

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
6,531
Reaction score
5,478
It doesn't really matter if you own a Gibson it's just part of the guitar.

It does seem to me, to matter a huge amount to people who don't own Gibson's...:hmm:
 

LuisPaul

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2011
Messages
248
Reaction score
91
Are you trying to make a copy of a Gibson guitar and want to put the name Gibson on it?
 

Philuk

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2013
Messages
504
Reaction score
322
Some people who throw the word troll about seem to be more of a troll than anyone else. Wankers.

I pay for the product, of course I want the name there.
 

GuitarJoe

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2009
Messages
495
Reaction score
550
Yeah, I need the "Gibson" on my headstock. No, I would not accept 25% off for having the logo removed. I'm fully aware this is not logical; rather it is emotional. And I'm fine with that.
 

voggin

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
773
Reaction score
771
Some of the weirder attitudes to brands seem almost unique to guitarists. I don't know if other musicians have these issues. For example, the idea that a player has to reach a certain level of accomplishment before they deserve a good guitar, like a reissue, otherwise they are poseurs. do pianists feel this way? I mean, lots of people own nice, fairly expensive Yamaha pianos, and they are only used for their kids lessons or xmas carols or drunken sing alongs. Nobody seems to care.

A friend of mine recently decided to take piano lessons again. She had taken some when she was a kid, and wanted a new hobby. She bought herself a top of the line digital piano, really a professional grade instrument. Everyone thought it was great for her. If she had bought a martin or a les paul, there are guitarists who would get all reverse-snobbish about it. Very strange.

I've played on and off for thirty years. I am at best a competent musician. Just got my first les paul a year or so ago. All I can say is I wish I had it 30+ years ago. I didn;t "deserve' it any less then.
 

Phoenix V

Member
Joined
May 31, 2013
Messages
74
Reaction score
57
The Gibson logo is important to a lot of people. There are some for who it isn't but that's no reflection on those to who it is.

The proof is in the illegal Gibson copy trade. Jackson rips offs are ho hum, Fender ripoffs are mildly interesting. BC Rich, no one actually really cares.

Chibsons? Well, they cause a right royal stir. People get worked up, defensive, and whether we like it or not.. they sell and probably by the truckload. And lets face it, there's a section of the consumer market that already knows its a fake, but they want the headstock with 'Gibson' on it, without having to pay the premium for the genuine headstock with the genuine logo on it.

It's about the branding, what the Gibson name represents, both today and in the history of the guitar and its association with generations past of musicians and influences and style.

So yeah, my headstock better have Gibson on it if it is, and not if it isn't.

Does that make me shallow? :(
 

rockstar232007

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2008
Messages
18,158
Reaction score
16,815
The Gibson logo is important to a lot of people. There are some for who it isn't but that's no reflection on those to who it is.

The proof is in the illegal Gibson copy trade. Jackson rips offs are ho hum, Fender ripoffs are mildly interesting. BC Rich, no one actually really cares.

Chibsons? Well, they cause a right royal stir. People get worked up, defensive, and whether we like it or not.. they sell and probably by the truckload. And lets face it, there's a section of the consumer market that already knows its a fake, but they want the headstock with 'Gibson' on it, without having to pay the premium for the genuine headstock with the genuine logo on it.

It's about the branding, what the Gibson name represents, both today and in the history of the guitar and its association with generations past of musicians and influences and style.

So yeah, my headstock better have Gibson on it if it is, and not if it isn't.

Does that make me shallow? :(
Great post, but there are a lot of us ("Gibsonites"), that buy Gibsons, not simply for the name on the headstock, but because they DO actually make some (and, by "some", I mean, "SOME") great guitars.
 

jc2000

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2013
Messages
6,915
Reaction score
3,862
Some of the weirder attitudes to brands seem almost unique to guitarists. I don't know if other musicians have these issues. For example, the idea that a player has to reach a certain level of accomplishment before they deserve a good guitar, like a reissue, otherwise they are poseurs. do pianists feel this way? I mean, lots of people own nice, fairly expensive Yamaha pianos, and they are only used for their kids lessons or xmas carols or drunken sing alongs. Nobody seems to care.

A friend of mine recently decided to take piano lessons again. She had taken some when she was a kid, and wanted a new hobby. She bought herself a top of the line digital piano, really a professional grade instrument. Everyone thought it was great for her. If she had bought a martin or a les paul, there are guitarists who would get all reverse-snobbish about it. Very strange.

I've played on and off for thirty years. I am at best a competent musician. Just got my first les paul a year or so ago. All I can say is I wish I had it 30+ years ago. I didn;t "deserve' it any less then.
I don't believe that you need to be a great player to deserve a high end guitar, If my pockets were deep enough and I wanted to by a $75,00.00 vintage, I would. I don't consider myself a great musician, but I do own a couple guitars that I spent over a couple K for. I love playing them and I'm not done buying yet.......
 

Latest Threads



Top