Horses Be Trollin'

SneakySnakeLady

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Fun story about how intelligent animals are, and how they like to troll us...

Today I went out to feed my Thoroughbred, Scooter, who is my favorite horse. He knows the routine and normally comes in the barn and stands and waits patiently while I get his food fixed up. He is a retired race horse and has arthritis and so his food consists of a huge concoction of feed, vitamins, supplements, arthritis meds, weight gainers and oil top dressing. It takes around 10-15 minutes to mix up.

Today he was super impatient and I could hear him outside the tack room rolling and pawing in the saw dust, banging on the door, nickering at me and just having an all out whine fest.

My tack room has a padlock on the door. I open it with a key and set the two parts of the lock on a little block of wood the door is bolted onto. This is to keep people, but more so, horses out.

So I get his food ready and he is eating and I'm milling around and so on. When he's done I go to lock the tack room door back, and am missing the bottom half of my pad lock. I thought it might have gotten knocked off, so I checked around the floor and no sign of it anywhere.

That mofo carried it off somewhere and I searched the entire barn and paddock and I can't find it anywhere!

Scooter is notorious for carrying things off, especially when he is being whiney. TB's are very high strung and demand to be the center of attention at all times. I call him my big diva.

I don't know when I'll find my other half of the lock, so I have to get a new one.

Scooter only punished himself though, if I can't lock the tack room then neither he or his buddies can hang out in the barn. Door has to be locked to keep them from getting in the tack room and killing themselves on feed. (Horses are made to graze continuously on forage, but if given the chance will gorge themselves literally to death on grain and other types of feed because their brain doesn't tell them to stop)





 

kevin65

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Lovely looking horse.

Horses are pretty intelligent animals and each has it's own personality, just like people. When I was a student I spent a couple of summers working with horses hauling timber from forestry. Had to be done by horse and they were thinning the forset and couldn't get machinery in to remove them. One of the horses called Captain was a mean SOB and only one guy could really handle him. The best was Charlie, who I supposed could be classified as a gentleman so everyone wanted to work with him. There was a mare who was a right b*tch. Just as you had her backed up to the load and were about to hook up the chains, she'd take off down to the road and you'd have to run after her. Of course, I made to load extra heavy to put manners on her when she pulled that stunt.

I did enjoy those summers.:)
 

SneakySnakeLady

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Lovely looking horse.

Horses are pretty intelligent animals and each has it's own personality, just like people. When I was a student I spent a couple of summers working with horses hauling timber from forestry. Had to be done by horse and they were thinning the forset and couldn't get machinery in to remove them. One of the horses called Captain was a mean SOB and only one guy could really handle him. The best was Charlie so everyone wanted to work with him. There was a mare who was a right b*tch. Just as you had her backed up to the load and were about to hook up the chains, she'd take off down to the road and you'd have to run after her. Of course, I made to load extra heavy to put manners on her when she pulled that stunt.

I did enjoy those summers.:)
They definitely do...folks who don't spend time around then have no idea just how much of a unique personality each one has and how clever they really are. Some of them LOVE to work, and some of them hate it. I have one of each :laugh2: The horse this thread is about loves working and any attention you give him, to the point where it's almost annoying sometimes. while my draft horse is lazy and grumpy and hates doing anything that doesn't involve eating. My donkeys are indifferent, as long as they get treats they will do pretty much anything.
 

Roberteaux

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He's certainly a beautiful horse... but then, most horses are!

And he out-sneaked the Sneaky Snake Lady? Heavens! :laugh2:

Hearing you describe him reminded me of one of my father's horses-- a black stallion named Romeo...

That horse loved dad-- but he sure did hate me. One time my father plunked me atop Romeo's back and into the saddle; Romeo stood patiently until dad handed me the reins, and them BLAMMO! Romeo took off at a full gallop with me aboard, screaming my little eight year-old brains out. YAAAAAAAAAAAH! :wow:

Ol' Romeo did a full tour of the paddock's perimeter fence at top speed. Dad had about forty acres, and Romeo completed the perimeter circuit in record time. Somehow or other, I managed to stay in the saddle, but when Romeo returned to where dad waited by the gate, I actually dove off that horse before he came to a full stop and plopped into the dust, fully and ignominiously defeated.

Dad was laughing his head off. He said, "You didn't even hold onto the reins! If you wanted him to slow down, you needed to rein him in like I told you!" I was so angry at dad right then that you could have fried an egg on my head.

Just a short time later, Romeo somehow got out of his stall (I tend to believe that most horses have a touch of Houdini in them, and figure that Scooter probably took off with your lock so as to study it) and ate all the radishes I had growing in a little patch near the barn. After that, I was so mad at Romeo (and so scared of him) that I used to just stayed away from the barn most of the time.

Dad was an expert horseman, and wanted me to experience the joys of horse riding. Undaunted by my refusal to go anywhere near either Romeo or Missy-- who was actually a very gentle mare that I was afraid of anyway, on account of her being even bigger than that feisty Arabian, Romeo-- my father purchased a Shetland pony from a friend and once again I found myself squirming in a saddle.

Everything went just fine, except that Romeo was out there in the paddock, grazing, and after a fashion he kind of sidled up to us and was eyeballing me in a way that I found to be menacing. My father was on Missy, though, and told me to ignore Romeo-- that he was just trying to punk me (and he did, he did!)...

Dad wanted to show me how to trot, but Romeo cut across the path my pony was on and launched into one of his patented galloping episodes. Missy just kept trotting, but the Shetland pony (who may have had a crush on Romeo) decided to take off after the fiendish black stallion. And though the altitude of her back and speed she produced was nothing like what it was like to be aboard ol' Rocket Balls Romeo, it was still too much for my tender young sensibilities...

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH! :wow:

This time I didn't even wait for the pony to slow down, but simply unassed the beast in a very hasty manner and hit the ground, this time with a distinct thud.

And I suffered a broken hand and arm in this particular crash landing. My father was laughing until he realized I had been hurt. He offered to ride me back to our house, but by this time I had sworn off horses completely, and walked back in while he walked the mare alongside me. He was amazed to hear how fluently I could curse, even at such a youthful age.

Dad apologized, and I loved him too much to be mad at him; it wasn't his fault that I was a crappy rider anyway. But as for Romeo... :mad:

After that, Dad only kept his horses for a couple more years. He suffered from an arthritic condition and his riding days were nearing an end anyway, but I guess the final blow was to learn that I'd rather do most anything other than ride a horse. And so he began to sell his horses off, and for a while there that paddock (is forty fenced acres still a "paddock"? I have never really known the definition of the word) did serve for a time as my dirt bike playground. But he finally sold the property altogether and I ended up just riding around in the woods and meadows near my house a lot.

Dad once marveled that I would ride a motorcycle, but not a horse. This seemed especially peculiar because I suffered yet more fractures, without complaint, by wiping out on my motocross bikes . I finally told him that the difference was that a motorcycle doesn't have a mind of its own.

To this day I wish I had been a bit more courageous. But that Romeo! He was enough to scare the crap out of me!

And yet, I still thought he was one of the most beautiful creatures I had ever seen... to this day, I love the sight of a horse, so long as I don't have to actually RIDE him.

Maybe I should take lessons? There are a lot of places near my home town where a man can take lessons, rent, and ride horses.

Or maybe not. After all, I DO still have a motorcycle!

--R :D

ETA: sorry about the long response to your thread, but this was a trip down memory lane for me. Really, all I mean to say at first was the Scooter sure is a beautiful creature!

See what you made me do? :laugh2:
 

tazzboy

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He just a mischievousness horse.
 

SneakySnakeLady

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He's certainly a beautiful horse... but then, most horses are!

And he out-sneaked the Sneaky Snake Lady? Heavens! :laugh2:

Hearing you describe him reminded me of one of my father's horses-- a black stallion named Romeo...

That horse loved dad-- but he sure did hate me. One time my father plunked me atop Romeo's back and into the saddle; Romeo stood patiently until dad handed me the reins, and them BLAMMO! Romeo took off at a full gallop with me aboard, screaming my little eight year-old brains out. YAAAAAAAAAAAH! :wow:

Ol' Romeo did a full tour of the paddock's perimeter fence at top speed. Dad had about forty acres, and Romeo completed the perimeter circuit in record time. Somehow or other, I managed to stay in the saddle, but when Romeo returned to where dad waited by the gate, I actually dove off that horse before he came to a full stop and plopped into the dust, fully and ignominiously defeated.

Dad was laughing his head off. He said, "You didn't even hold onto the reins! If you wanted him to slow down, you needed to rein him in like I told you!" I was so angry at dad right then that you could have fried an egg on my head.

Just a short time later, Romeo somehow got out of his stall (I tend to believe that most horses have a touch of Houdini in them, and figure that Scooter probably took off with your lock so as to study it) and ate all the radishes I had growing in a little patch near the barn. After that, I was so mad at Romeo (and so scared of him) that I used to just stayed away from the barn most of the time.

Dad was an expert horseman, and wanted me to experience the joys of horse riding. Undaunted by my refusal to go anywhere near either Romeo or Missy-- who was actually a very gentle mare that I was afraid of anyway, on account of her being even bigger than that feisty Arabian, Romeo-- my father purchased a Shetland pony from a friend and once again I found myself squirming in a saddle.

Everything went just fine, except that Romeo was out there in the paddock, grazing, and after a fashion he kind of sidled up to us and was eyeballing me in a way that I found to be menacing. My father was on Missy, though, and told me to ignore Romeo-- that he was just trying to punk me (and he did, he did!)...

Dad wanted to show me how to trot, but Romeo cut across the path my pony was on and launched into one of his patented galloping episodes. Missy just kept trotting, but the Shetland pony (who may have had a crush on Romeo) decided to take off after the fiendish black stallion. And though the altitude of her back and speed she produced was nothing like what it was like to be aboard ol' Rocket Balls Romeo, it was still too much for my tender young sensibilities...

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH! :wow:

This time I didn't even wait for the pony to slow down, but simply unassed the beast in a very hasty manner and hit the ground, this time with a distinct thud.

And I suffered a broken hand and arm in this particular crash landing. My father was laughing until he realized I had been hurt. He offered to ride me back to our house, but by this time I had sworn off horses completely, and walked back in while he walked the mare alongside me. He was amazed to hear how fluently I could curse, even at such a youthful age.

Dad apologized, and I loved him too much to be mad at him; it wasn't his fault that I was a crappy rider anyway. But as for Romeo... :mad:

After that, Dad only kept his horses for a couple more years. He suffered from an arthritic condition and his riding days were nearing an end anyway, but I guess the final blow was to learn that I'd rather do most anything other than ride a horse. And so he began to sell his horses off, and for a while there that paddock (is forty fenced acres still a "paddock"? I have never really known the definition of the word) did serve for a time as my dirt bike playground. But he finally sold the property altogether and I ended up just riding around in the woods and meadows near my house a lot.

Dad once marveled that I would ride a motorcycle, but not a horse. This seemed especially peculiar because I suffered yet more fractures, without complaint, by wiping out on my motocross bikes . I finally told him that the difference was that a motorcycle doesn't have a mind of its own.

To this day I wish I had been a bit more courageous. But that Romeo! He was enough to scare the crap out of me!

And yet, I still thought he was one of the most beautiful creatures I had ever seen... to this day, I love the sight of a horse, so long as I don't have to actually RIDE him.

Maybe I should take lessons? There are a lot of places near my home town where a man can take lessons, rent, and ride horses.

Or maybe not. After all, I DO still have a motorcycle!

--R :D

ETA: sorry about the long response to your thread, but this was a trip down memory lane for me. Really, all I mean to say at first was the Scooter sure is a beautiful creature!

See what you made me do? :laugh2:
One thing you had going against you is that Romeo was an ARABIAN, and an ARABIAN STALLION at that! My God! I would have jumped at the chance to ride an Arab stallion when I was young and in the prime of my riding career...But today I wouldn't touch that with a 10ft pole! Arabs are extremely fiery anyways. I've only ridden a few and the only calm ones were the ones who were ancient. I almost bought an Arab instead of my draft horse Sherlock...but my parents took one look at the Arab and said no way, he was just a bit too dangerous.

All horses have a little Houdini in them it's true, but mine excel at this. Especially the donkeys! My big donkey Cleatis is famous for being able to open most any gate, and even those Carribeaner (sp?) clasps that you have to fold in to open...he opens those with his lips. One time my dad and I were standing out by one of the buildings next to the pasture and we heard the gate rattle a little and then here comes a stampede of horses. Cleatis opened the gate and let everybody out and they ran around in the yard around the house and made a fun game of being caught again.

Also, my draft horse not only can open the gates, but he JUMPS. It is an incredible thing to watch a 2,000 lb animal jump 5ft at a stand still, and he's done it. So we have 6ft fencing with electric strands at the top middle and bottom....along with chained and locked gates.

Paddocks I consider to be small areas...my ''barn paddock'' is a tiny fenced in area around the front of my barn where I bring the horses in to tie for grooming/farrier etc...Scooter comes in to eat so I can shut him off from the others who try to steal his food. I prefer to use the paddock to stalls...I have stalls in my barn but they are rarely used. Stalled horses are unhappy horses. That is another thing- if Romeo was kept in a stall most of the time, THAT will make him even more hyped up. If I have to keep one of mine stalled for a few days- normally for an injury- when they are let out again they are bat shit crazy!

Riding lessons are a good thing, it would also be good if you found a place where they did trail rides. Most trail rides have an option to just walk leisurely and enjoy the ride on seasoned horses. The key is well trained, older, relaxed horses if you don't have any experience. Then you work your way up if wanted. I used to prefer to ride the craziest horses I could get my hands on...but now....no! I just want to plod around. Scooter, while full of energy and spunk and having history as a race horse...he is the pokiest, ploddiest horse once you are actually on his back. Also , a HELMET!!! Always have to have a helmet!!

My horses don't get ridden as much these days...They are in training for driving, but it isn't always every day, depending on what is going on. Mostly I just have them for companionship...They make incredible long lived friends. Some days I will spend hours outside just grooming them, talking to and feeding them treats and just enjoying their company.
 

bertzie

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I would almost pay to watch a draft horse jump. And then feel the thunder when he hits the ground!
 

lespaul01

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My cat Vernie was born to troll me.. he will wake me scratching and meowing.. Ill get a soft pillow and threaten him with it a few times.

Then ... Ill throw it at him.. he will run off...


We do that sometimes for a 1/2 hour. Crazy fvker
 

Roberteaux

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SSL: thank you very much for the very interesting and useful reply! I have heard over the years that these Arabians are "highly spirited" (Romeo sure was!) but never really knew for sure if they were truly all that much different from other horse-types or not. I am guessing from your answer that this is indeed the truth about 'em.

And yes: that crazy Romeo was indeed a stallion, all parts intact, and from my perspective, he was one really mean dude. The idea behind the Shetland pony was that I would supposedly be able to control her... but we saw how that ended! :laugh2:

Had to chuckle at the idea of Cleatis being able to open a lock, even one secured by a carabiner! I am also amazed at the thought of a huge draft horse jumping like that... seems that all members of the equid class of beings have a few more tricks about them than most people would suspect! :D

I once worked as a security guard for the horse barn at the New York State fair... one night, a horse belonging to the state and ridden by the NYS police somehow got out of his stall. This was not on my shift, though I was sleeping in the barn at night anyway... but to cut the tale short, that horse galloped off and ended up on the Midway. The fair had closed down for the night, so no problem there, but nobody could catch that horse until the trooper assigned to ride him showed up and merely talked him into chilling out and then led him back to the barn. That was when I realized that horses were a lot smarter than I had ever given them credit for being.

And thanks for the explanation of what a "paddock" is, too. I guess that Dad's horse playground was more of a meadow than a paddock...

As for lessons: thanks for the advice. You know, I might just take it up. Somehow, I have always felt a bit... deficient... for having allowed a horse to buffalo me like that. And anyway, I'm always looking for fun new things to do, so thank you again for your reply!

--R :)
 

SneakySnakeLady

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I would almost pay to watch a draft horse jump. And then feel the thunder when he hits the ground!
Drafts are great jumpers, it's a talent most of them keep hidden...unless it's to escape a pasture. I've seen others besides mine do the same thing. They have a ton of power in their hind quarters which lets them get one big powerful push off..which is why most of them walk right up to a fence and then take off straight from the ground rather than running to the jump like a lighter horse would.

 

bertzie

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Dayum son! I would not want to be under him when he comes down.
 

Engel

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Dayum son! I would not want to be under him when he comes down.
My brother was stampeded by our Belgium, Big Dan. Put him in a coma for about a month and a full body cast for 6 months. There's not much that can stop them once they get moving.
 

SneakySnakeLady

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SSL: thank you very much for the very interesting and useful reply! I have heard over the years that these Arabians are "highly spirited" (Romeo sure was!) but never really knew for sure if they were truly all that much different from other horse-types or not. I am guessing from your answer that this is indeed the truth about 'em.

And yes: that crazy Romeo was indeed a stallion, all parts intact, and from my perspective, he was one really mean dude. The idea behind the Shetland pony was that I would supposedly be able to control her... but we saw how that ended! :laugh2:

Had to chuckle at the idea of Cleatis being able to open a lock, even one secured by a carabiner! I am also amazed at the thought of a huge draft horse jumping like that... seems that all members of the equid class of beings have a few more tricks about them than most people would suspect! :D

I once worked as a security guard for the horse barn at the New York State fair... one night, a horse belonging to the state and ridden by the NYS police somehow got out of his stall. This was not on my shift, though I was sleeping in the barn at night anyway... but to cut the tale short, that horse galloped off and ended up on the Midway. The fair had closed down for the night, so no problem there, but nobody could catch that horse until the trooper assigned to ride him showed up and merely talked him into chilling out and then led him back to the barn. That was when I realized that horses were a lot smarter than I had ever given them credit for being.

And thanks for the explanation of what a "paddock" is, too. I guess that Dad's horse playground was more of a meadow than a paddock...

As for lessons: thanks for the advice. You know, I might just take it up. Somehow, I have always felt a bit... deficient... for having allowed a horse to buffalo me like that. And anyway, I'm always looking for fun new things to do, so thank you again for your reply!

--R :)
I guess I should say that not ''all'' Arabs are insane...there are always exceptions...But in my experience most every one I have come across has been a lot more like this one

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Jk-z95-9A&feature=related]Little Arab Misbehaving! - YouTube[/ame]


Some people say the same thing about Thoroughbreds, and they are my favorite breed and have been for years. Even before I had Scooter most of the Dressage horses I worked with were rescued TB's. I guess it's all a matter of personal preference. I find the TB's much smarter than other horses and more personable. They are spirited but rarely in a mean way...you just have to know when and how to tell them to cool it a little when they start to get a little too excited. Even Scooter has his days, but he knows that when I tell him to chill I mean it.

Come up to visit us and you can take a spin on one of my horses in my training pen...very non threatening!
 


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