honey bee deaths, new study

geochem1st

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this one needs a thread to itself.....

'Researchers collected pollen from hives on the east coast pollinating cranberry, watermelon and other crops and fed it to healthy bees, those bees showed a significant decline in their ability to resist infection by a parasite called Nosema ceranae. The parasite has been implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder though scientists took pains to point out that their findings do not directly link the pesticides to CCD. The pollen was contaminated on average with nine different pesticides and fungicides though scientists discovered 21 agricultural chemicals in one sample. Scientists identified eight ag chemicals associated with increased risk of infection by the parasite.

Most disturbing, bees that ate pollen contaminated with fungicides were three times as likely to be infected by the parasite. Widely used, fungicides had been thought to be harmless for bees as they’re designed to kill fungus, not insects, on crops like apples.

“There’s growing evidence that fungicides may be affecting the bees on their own and I think what it highlights is a need to reassess how we label these agricultural chemicals,” Dennis vanEngelsdorp, the study’s lead author, told Quartz.

Labels on pesticides warn farmers not to spray when pollinating bees are in the vicinity but such precautions have not applied to fungicides.

Bee populations are so low in the US that it now takes 60% of the country’s surviving colonies just to pollinate one California crop, almonds. And that’s not just a west coast problem—California supplies 80% of the world’s almonds, a market worth $4 billion.

In recent years, a class of chemicals called neonicotinoids has been linked to bee deaths and in April regulators banned the use of the pesticide for two years in Europe where bee populations have also plummeted. But vanEngelsdorp, an assistant research scientist at the University of Maryland, says the new study shows that the interaction of multiple pesticides is affecting bee health.

“The pesticide issue in itself is much more complex than we have led to be believe,” he says. “It’s a lot more complicated than just one product, which means of course the solution does not lie in just banning one class of product.”

read more here.... Scientists discover what’s killing the bees and it’s worse than you thought – Quartz


the actual paper is far more interesting and can be read here .....

PLOS ONE: Crop Pollination Exposes Honey Bees to Pesticides Which Alters Their Susceptibility to the Gut Pathogen Nosema ceranae
 

JTM45

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Just read this somewhere else recently, we have passed the point of no return.
 

fett

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The insects will adapt. If they don't, we lose.
 

JTM45

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They're not adapting and they can't to poison.
 

geochem1st

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The insects will adapt. If they don't, we lose.

if i poison you and have to hope that you will adapt or if you don't i am going to die because of it .... what course of action to you think will be most productive :hmm:


a] stop the poisoning, or b] wait until you adapt :cool:
 

fett

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You are selling insects way short. The bees will survive.
 

hecube

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I saw a live bee today. That's the first time I've seen one in years.
 

Blackie

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.. Most people have no idea how serious this is, bees are a critical part of our ecosystem. To just wave this off as no big deal is ignorant.
 

geochem1st

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You are selling insects way short. The bees will survive.

The numbers state otherwise. We’re currently experiencing the worst round of species die-offs since the loss of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Although extinction is a natural process, it occurs at a “background” rate of about one to five species per year. The estimate is that we’re now losing species at 1,000 to 10,000 times the background rate, with literally dozens going extinct every day.

99 percent of the currently threatened species are at risk from human activities, primarily those activities driving habitat loss, introduction of exotic species, and the use of chemical controls. Because the rate of change in the biosphere is increasing, and because every species’ extinction potentially leads to the extinction of others bound to that species..... as many species are codependent, the numbers of extinctions are likely to snowball in the coming decades as damage to ecosystems increase and they continue to unravel. We are a codependent species, no honey bees, no us.
 

raythewrench

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You don't mess with the balance of nature / wildlife ,the
enviornmental sins of our
Previous generations are coming to light now.
 

PapaSquash

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And experience with bald eagles shows that if we stop with the poison they have a shot at making a comeback. Just stop.
 

Actinic

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I can see Monsanto pushing for ....





GENETICALLY MODIFIED BEES

that are resistant to neonicotinoids.
 

Barcham

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When I was a kid in the '60s and '70s, when we went and played in the park, grasshoppers were everywhere. Now I honestly cannot remember the last time I saw one jump from a lawn or even when walking in the very large park across the street from my building. I can't remember the last time I saw a wasp or a Bee either. Not even butterflies now that I think of it.

We are destroying our ecosystem just so that people can have perfect looking fruit, with little taste, and perfect lawns.
 

hecube

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I remember monarch butterflies being everywhere when I was young. I can't remember the last time I saw one. In fact, they are apparently collapsing as a species.

Way to go humans. Living on this planet shouldn't come at the expense of other species.
 

Drew224

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I was born in 1995. I remember seeing bees in my backyard all the time as a little kid. I never see them anymore. Without them, everything we have is going to die. We will have artificially pollinate things to get them to reproduce, and that will kill food costs and kill the poor.
 

QBob

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Yeah, I think those bees are the Canary in Coal Mine.

I wonder if the Killer bees are a symptom of the same cause, those nasty critters put the kill on you quick like.
 

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