Hey F-150 owners, the F-150 EV is officially unveiled. Ford Lightning, here you go.

Tone deaf

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I am looking for a new pickup. The used market is insane.

I like the idea of the electric pickup truck, but it really would be for a limited (but still quite large) audience. If I was hauling stuff around town, all day, every day, the range would probably never be an issue. I could charge up for free at the town lot, during lunch (or happy our as there are several bars near the lot). As an every day driver, it might be great.

However, my folks live a little under 300 miles from me and I see them at least once a month. So, with this truck a 4.0 hour ride is now at least a 4.75 hour ride (each way). That is an hour and a half sitting still each trip. I make that drive with an eye on the dash watching both "Elapsed time" and "average speed." I have certain expectations as to how long is appropriate to make the journey. Best time was 3:29, worst time was 7+ hours (with holiday traffic, kids and about 100 bathroom stops). I never look at the gas gauge because if I start with a full tank, I can go close to 450+ miles (if all highway speeds). I've been doing that trip for 28 years, other than going out of my way for donuts, I never thought about actually doing anything that would add to the time of travel. So, that range would relegate it to being less capable that I would really want it to be. Using the 260-300 range and an average charge being 45 minutes, over the past 30 years, I would have spent nearly 250 hours (or over 10 days) or sitting around with my thumb up my ass at a charging station.

Additionally, my one desired "Extra" for a new pickup truck would that it be good off road* and getting me to and from the places I want to go. From what I can tell, there are four electric charging stations in the roughly 50,000 square miles of wilderness that I particularly enjoy in northern, Maine. I don't think that I would enjoy the added stress of planning my trips around getting to a charging station that is on the margin of the truck's range and coming up short.

It isn't the truck's fault, it just doesn't meet my needs. I've never really been average...:laugh2:

All that said, electric vehicles play into what my company does, so it could be great daily driver around town and good business optics.



* I do realize that for better off road, I will probably need to step down to a midsized pickup. The current front runner is the Tacoma TRD although I am partial to Jeeps.
 
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DotStudio

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Well, here I am again on this thread. Olds, I am sorry that you felt you should cancel, but I think you were right in doing so. I have a college degree in marketing (business admin) from the U of Arkansas. There are three factors in marketing. Tell the people what you have for sale, including all options and costs. Tell the people what their cost will be. Finally, tell the people why they should pay that cost to get the product the way they want it. Ford blew it on all three factors, IMHO. Now, I have no opinion as to whether the truck I would want is any good or worth its cost — because Ford won’t tell me the facts up front and easily. In fact, Ford‘s marketing strategy for this truck is so bad that it pissed me off (in case you couldn’t tell). For example, if I could get the truck I would want for MSRP (and real price) of like $55K or so, I might be interested. But because Ford won’t tell me without getting a refundable commitment from me, I’ll never know — but I doubt it.
They don't tell you any more information after providing the deposit. You're simply paying a nominal fee for a place in line so you will have the ability to purchase if you like what you see when orders become available. When that day comes, and you don't like the available options, you step out of line and get your money back. How is this complicated? They both created hype around their product and gained valuable intel regarding its viability in the marketplace. Seems like solid marketing to me. :dunno:
 

Olds442

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that giant goofy tablet in the dashboard started to bother you didn't it. :laugh2:
naw, it was that i finally figured out what an optioned truck with the 300 mile range will cost. let me tell you, tesla is going to own this space. and i dog on tesla these days, but they have over 1 million cybertruck reservations.
Well, here I am again on this thread. Olds, I am sorry that you felt you should cancel, but I think you were right in doing so. I have a college degree in marketing (business admin) from the U of Arkansas. There are three factors in marketing. Tell the people what you have for sale, including all options and costs. Tell the people what their cost will be. Finally, tell the people why they should pay that cost to get the product the way they want it. Ford blew it on all three factors, IMHO. Now, I have no opinion as to whether the truck I would want is any good or worth its cost — because Ford won’t tell me the facts up front and easily. In fact, Ford‘s marketing strategy for this truck is so bad that it pissed me off (in case you couldn’t tell). For example, if I could get the truck I would want for MSRP (and real price) of like $55K or so, I might be interested. But because Ford won’t tell me without getting a refundable commitment from me, I’ll never know — but I doubt it.
i think ford did the right thing releasing it in a semi surprise way. i also think they will sell a fuck load of them. but the one i'd want will cost me around $70k minimum, before taxes and whatnot? not worth it. cybertruck is $49k, does everything and it's bulletproof to a degree. and if i get antsy and want something sooner, then i scrap the plans and just pull the plug on a 5 yr old F150 and call it a day.

or i continue to limp the FX35 until the body falls off, equally possible.
 
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Z2112

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Dolebludger

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They don't tell you any more information after providing the deposit. You're simply paying a nominal fee for a place in line so you will have the ability to purchase if you like what you see when orders become available. When that day comes, and you don't like the available options, you step out of line and get your money back. How is this complicated? They both created hype around their product and gained valuable intel regarding its viability in the marketplace. Seems like solid marketing to me. :dunno:
This is interesting, because I had assumed that putting down a deposit would open up a site to build and price the vehicle. I guess I shouldn’t assume anything these days! So a question. When in this process does a potential buyer get a chance to configure and price the vehicle?
 

Bytor1958

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I saw a video where a guy drove 2,000 miles in a Tesla. It had 9 hrs of charging time in his trip.
 

DotStudio

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This is interesting, because I had assumed that putting down a deposit would open up a site to build and price the vehicle. I guess I shouldn’t assume anything these days! So a question. When in this process does a potential buyer get a chance to configure and price the vehicle?
Orders begin Fall 2021.
 

Olds442

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I saw a video where a guy drove 2,000 miles in a Tesla. It had 9 hrs of charging time in his trip.
what model tesla? the different models are capable of different charging times. my guess is they are un-throttling the 85kWh pack cars.

my model 3 charged faster than I could down a meal at buffalo wild wings.
 

KSG_Standard

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This is interesting, because I had assumed that putting down a deposit would open up a site to build and price the vehicle. I guess I shouldn’t assume anything these days! So a question. When in this process does a potential buyer get a chance to configure and price the vehicle?
They're not really selling you the truck now, this is a marketing ploy to gen up interest and to gauge the public interest in the vehicle. This is the same kind of marketing scheme used for Tesla's Cybertruck and Ford's new Bronco. It apparently works very well as they've got people talking about it and plonking down a hundy just for the hell of it. I think you're overthinking the deal.
 

Bytor1958

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what model tesla? the different models are capable of different charging times. my guess is they are un-throttling the 85kWh pack cars.

my model 3 charged faster than I could down a meal at buffalo wild wings.
It was a model 3. Another problem I see with these is. You have to follow a route where chargers are available. You're limited that way. No back roads. What if I don't want to follow their path?
 

Olds442

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It was a model 3. Another problem I see with these is. You have to follow a route where chargers are available. You're limited that way. No back roads. What if I don't want to follow their path?
well truthfully you can set different routes, add way points you want to stop at, etc. it will follow your points of interest you enter in the trip. it just switches different stations based on your goals.

surely there's places that are too far off route now, but probably won't be in the future as more stations come on board.

the other caveat, is that the screen only shows you superchargers and bases your trip solely on those, you can charge at other charge points obviously and things like "better trip finder" takes them all into account.

not perfect, but pretty decent. charge times of 30-40 minutes from nearly zero to 94% were what I experienced and i feel that's fast enough.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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it's interesting to me that it's growing. There has to be a tipping point right? I mean you need adapters (people) to switch to electric, but you need the infrastructure in place to attract people to it, but you can't build the infrastructure if you don't have the people. It's an interesting balancing act and makes me wonder at what point it will tip over far enough where people are like, "yeah this isn't going away"

Some of the math is interesting too. Like in that video he says he went 2,000 miles on the equivalent of like 15 gallons of gas.

I can see the argument being made that while yes it requires energy or fossil fuel to create the electricity to power that car 2,000 miles, but maybe it's less energy than what's required to produce the gas for a regular car to drive 2,000 miles.

I'm interested in the math of energy consumption between the two types of vehicles.

Then like my hybrid, it uses way less gas and the energy created by the wheels turning is what recharges the battery. So I never have to plug it in, I like that, it charges itself. It just switches between battery and engine as it needs to.
 
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lancpudn

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Those big tablet screens are going to be prime advertising real estate & big money earners for car manufacturers....well they have to make money from somewhere as they wont be making much money on servicing these things. :shock: They will use the same cameras that read speed limit signs that will beam billboard advertisement signs directly into the infotainment system :wow: to annoy the crapolla out of you.
 

DotStudio

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it's interesting to me that it's growing. There has to be a tipping point right? I mean you need adapters (people) to switch to electric, but you need the infrastructure in place to attract people to it, but you can't build the infrastructure if you don't have the people. It's an interesting balancing act and makes me wonder at what point it will tip over far enough where people are like, "yeah this isn't going away"

Some of the math is interesting too. Like in that video he says he went 2,000 miles on the equivalent of like 15 gallons of gas.

I can see the argument being made that while yes it requires energy or fossil fuel to create the electricity to power that car 2,000 miles, but maybe it's less energy than what's required to produce the gas for a regular car to drive 2,000 miles.

I'm interested in the math of energy consumption between the two types of vehicles.

Then like my hybrid, it uses way less gas and the energy created by the wheels turning is what recharges the battery. So I never have to plug it in, I like that, it charges itself. It just switches between battery and engine as it needs to.
You'll never need an oil change for the rest of your life either. No leaking seals. Spark plugs. No gears to crap out in your transmission.

From a pure performance and maintenance standpoint, it's the superior technology by a wide margin. Infrastructure and range are the only stumbling blocks, but the tech is still in its relative infancy. It'll get there.

Build nukes.
 


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