Help me with installing nut

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Hey guys, I need help with installing new nut.. 'Tech" ruined chanell so I now must replace nut myself since there is no good tech/luthier here. I ordered TUSQ XL, and it fits now like in images. What should I do with this to fit it? Sand the bottom at the angle, or sand it down flat and use a bit of white wood glue to fill the holes? Thanks.



 

truckermde

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I have had the same situation, and sanded the bottom of the nut, carefully.

Just do a few strokes over the sandpaper, and check fit. Repeat.
 

kakerlak

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Looks like you've got a substantial amount of material to sand off the bottom of that nut, anyway, just from how high the strings look to be sitting. I'd see how close you can get to matching the slot while you do. If the slots seems to have gotten wallowed out so that there's not a level/even floor to it, beyond simply being angled, then I might try to chase that down flat with a file (which might help square it up).
 

vetteman

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If the slot in the guitar looks even and level side to side, I would leave the guitar alone and sand the nut to fit. Much easier to obtain another nut than to repair and refinish the guitar if a mistake is made! Looks like you will be ok with the overall height, and if not, would be able to obtain an oversize bone blank.
 

cmjohnson

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Using a properly sized file, square up the nut floor and seat the nut blank solidly to it. And never let THAT "technician" ever touch another guitar of yours. And spread the word about his bad work to other guitar owners.

There's just no excuse for that kind of screwup.
 

WhiteEpiLP

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Yeah cmjohnson right. That nut slot has been butchered by that “tech”.
If you have a decent square file that’s an easy fix, just make sure to put some masking tape on the front edge of the fretboard so you don’t file into the board. Then square up the channel, then you can start sanding down the nut until you reach an appropriate height to the first fret, too high and you will pull the note sharpe, too low and she’ll buzz like a bee. While you’re at it though you might need to adjust the slots for each string, a set of nut files should be used to create the right sized “u” shaped channel, you don’t want a square or v channel.
Then when it is sized and your happy with it glue it in with a couple dots of super glue, you might wanna tape off the surrounding area before you glue just in case.
 

moreles

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I had to replace a nut in a botched channel once, and chose to suqare the channel. I have a file that happened to be the exact widtyhe needed, and it came out great. But it is incredibly easy to make things worse, so if you are not confident and experienced, beware! As other have said, it's not hard to "customize" the nut base to match the funky slot, and far less risky. I wouldn't use a lot of glue as a space filler, though I would consider using CA and mahogany sawdust if I wanted to square the slot by building up rather than cutting.
 

Freddy G

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But it is incredibly easy to make things worse, so if you are not confident and experienced, beware!
Yep. Just ask the "luthier" that did it. It's not that easy to square up and flatten the slot....you can easily make it worse.
 

LtDave32

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It's not just the right angles that you see in those pics that can get screwed up.

Also, the other dimensions, such as the floor of that notch getting sanded lower on one side than the other side. Even though its flat. And 90 degrees to that, the face of where the overlay is.

Nuts are critical. It's so easy to screw up this thing that seems so simple.

I would recommend a true professional over a side-room "tech".

Years and years ago, my best friend was recommended such a "tech" who worked out of a prominent music store in Santa Monica, CA. We went there to have a new nut put on his prized Gibson F series mandolin. The tech was all "oh, sure I can do it".. We came back to a horror-show of uneven courses, poorly cut nut, then the bridge.. Oy vey..

We ended up taking it to the great staff at Buffalo Brothers In Carlsbad, CA. True professionals. They do all the work on Chris Hillman's (Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers) mandolins.

True to form, they fixed her up beautifully.


Go to a pro. I beg you.
 


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