Help identifying Gibson SG '72 parts

Vandenberg

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Hello,

I have this guitar that I inherited from my grandfather. I've searched google and best I can tell this model is a Gibson SG Deluxe Vintage from the 1970s. Regrettably, according to stories at some point it fell head first from a stage, and has a damaged as a result. I play some guitar but never really had a use for this particular one, due to the damage it has way too much action so not playable by me. Nevertheless, for nostalgia's sake, at some point I had it brought to a guitar shop for some repairs, but these never helped one thing.

Anyway now I'm looking to sell what's left of it, because maybe there's an enthusiast out there that could make something of the remaining parts. But for that I'd like to know what I'm really dealing with here. So I was hoping the members of this forum would be willing to bestow some knowledge on me.

The Guitar:


Vibrato - So a friend tells me this is an original Bigsby although it says Gibson on it. Does anyone know what kind of model this is with some more specifically? I think this piece could be valuable to somebody who customizes or builds guitars



Pickups - Same friend tells me these might be humbuckers or P90's. Although these things also have Gibson it, to me they look cheap as dirt. They're also not the kind of pickups that I see on the models I find online. I don't know what these are supposed to be and if they're to any value of collectors.



Bridge, knobs, tuners, suitcase - These seem like the original thing. Again, how would I call these things if I want to offer them online?







The Damage - so a little bit about the damage.. Sadly this guitar has a crack at the cutaway, causing the neck to bend forward creating a massive distance between the fret board and the strings. The body also was coated in this ugly aubergine purple paint-job. I've been told that won't come of easy. What I'm wondering here, are the head stock and/or neck still usable by a collector?





Thanks to anyone taking time to read this
 

Dolebludger

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While I can't answer all your questions, I'll try to answer some. The pickups look like P 90s, but I've never seen mounting rings like that used with P 90s.It almost looks like the guitar was routed for humbuckers and the rings were used to secure the smaller P 90s. I also wonder what those washers under the outboard pickup adjustment screws are for. I would say that the body is pretty much a train wreck, with breaks at the headstock an at the heel joint with the body (and also an apparent break on the headstock). In my opinion, the most valuable part is probably the tremolo.
 

zombiwoof

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I think a good luthier could fix the neck problems, even though they are extensive. Don't know about the pickups, probably could tell with a pic of the actual pickups. The Bigsby is a Gibson-labeled Bigsby (B5 I assume), made for Gibson by Bigsby. Tuners might be worth something, but I think the right person might want to save the whole guitar.
Al
 

Dolebludger

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Yes, but how to find the right person so that the repairs and refinish costs don't exceed the value of the guitar. That is the question. This guitar comes from a period in Gibson's history called the Norlin years. This refers to the ownership of Gibson in the 70s, and the design changes that differed from earlier and later Gibsons. This is clear, as the bridge is clearly Norlin era. From what I know, Norlin era Gibson guitars aren't worth as much as earlier and later model Gibsons, even in good condition. And the value would be decreased further due to the fact that repairs and refinish were done, even if done perfectly. Also, I am rather convinced that the pickups are not the original ones, although they may be period correct. It really appears that the guitar was originally fitted with humbuckers, and retrofitted with smaller P 90s via use of mounting rings of the sort I have never seen.

The choice apparently is to repair and sell, or to part out. For you to decide which way to go, you might first check the prices of 70s (Norlin era) SGs on Reverb.com. that are in reasonable condition. Then consult a luthier in your community as to the cost of repair and refinish of the body. Also have the electronics checked out to see if they even still work, to get toe total cost of repair. If restoration costs are close to the selling price of working guitars of this make, model, and era, perhaps the best thing to do would be to advertise it on Reverb, ebay, or craigslist as a "project guitar". At what price, I do not know, but suspect it wouldn't be much. But then, it would be bought by a "
 

ARandall

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Quite frankly I'd be looking at posting this in the luthiers corner, and see if there are any guys wanting to buy the thing whole - for a luthier such a guitar will be well worth it as they will be able to affect repairs quite easily. And the refin is nothing at all for these sort of people too.
 

tigger

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This is a SG Pro (not deluxe, deluxe has block inlays) and is quite different from a the much more desirable 1960's models. You probably wouldn't get more than $1500 for it in a completely mint state. The good news is that it looks fully stock to me, the bad news is that the crack will be a nasty one going into the P90 routes and so it requires a complete disassembly and pretty difficult gluing job and refinish in an opaque color.

IMHO the parts on it are relatively worthless with the possible exception of the Bigsby. Are you completely opposed to fixing it yourself? It's not impossible. I did more major surgery on a '65 recently being equipped with no particular experience (http://www.tdpri.com/threads/rebuilding-a-65-sg.776592/ - TDPRI thread is easier to read since it goes to the point).
 


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