Healthy Home-cooked Recipes

kmk108

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People are always looking for fancy recipes and I don't understand why. For supper I usually have some sort of meat, a vegetable (usually steamed), and a filler like rice or sweet potato.

Maybe I am just boring?

Not really fancy, just different than meat and veggies.

I'm probably just crazy, but I'd take a fast food burger over a homecooked meal any day. I'm trying to find things that get me excited to cook and eat my own dinner instead of just driving down the street and getting a Supersonic Cheeseburger.
 

Captain Howdy

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Not really fancy, just different than meat and veggies.

I'm probably just crazy, but I'd take a fast food burger over a homecooked meal any day. I'm trying to find things that get me excited to cook and eat my own dinner instead of just driving down the street and getting a Supersonic Cheeseburger.
Have you tried making home made burgers? They are very easy and you can add your own toppings. All you need is some raw mince (beef or pork or a combination of both), a beaten egg, some finely chopped onion, breadcrumbs, some herbs and spices of your choice, and of course some hamburger buns fresh from a baker. Just place all ingredients in a large bowl, mix together using your hands, and then shape the mixture into balls. Place them on a plate and cover with gladwrap (clingfoil I think you call it) and put them in the fridge for a couple of hours, or overnight. Cook them on the barbie, or a heated frying pan. Gently flatten them out with a spatula and cook them to your desired level. You can make as many as you like. What you don't cook you can freeze. I can't guarantee that some of the patties won't fall apart as you are cooking them. If you're careful when you flatten the balls, they should be ok. The egg acts as a binding agent and the breadcrumbs absorb some of the excess moisture .:cheers:
 

JCM900MkIII

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Like fries? Would you like healthy fries? (instead of frying in rgular fat or oil, you can bake a lot of things in an oven with olive oil)


Ingredients:

Potatoes
Olive oil (for baking, not dressing)
(Seasoning, powdered garlic + thyme for instance)

Peel potatos, and cut them in quarts.
Boil for 2-3 minutes.
Drain the potatos and let them cool for a bit.

Put the potatos in a bowl, add prefered seasoning (the powdered garlic&thyme combination is ace!).
Add about 2 tablespoons of olive oil and mix/coat the potatos

Now, the oven should be pre-heated to about 220 celcius (420 F'ish)
Spread the potatos on the baking tray (tray covered with greaseproof paper)
Hand turn the potatos after they have enough collor (~10 minutes).



Good enough for a Michelin star...
 

Shawn Lutz

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Just start cooking and buying less processed foods. Chicken, beef, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. Cut out the junk food, candy, chips, fried foods, ice cream etc.

We started getting catered lunches for free about 8 months ago. I used to think I was eating fairly health lunches (frozen foods, subway etc) and I'd usually pack on about 8-10 winter pounds as I don't run as much as I like to in the winters. This year I ran the least I ever have in the winter (minor injury+laziness) but I didn't gain any weight at all. I think it was not eating processed foods and occasional fast foods, the home cooked meals for lunch had a lot to do with it.
 

Barcham

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Just as a follow up to my previous post:

Tonight for supper I had prime skinless chicken breast pan fried in olive oil with a little bit of soy sauce and black pepper. I sliced it and mixed it with steamed broccoli and steamed carrots over white rice. Cost about $4 a plate in materials, took 15 mins to make, and is probably as healthy as you can get.

If you bought the chicken breast already skinless and boneless, you spent way too much money, especially if it was one of those pre-packaged items. Buy whole chickens when they are on special at a local butcher shop, not a grocery store, and learn how to butcher it yourself. It's a simple thing to do and you'll save a fortune. You will also have a nice carcass at the end to use for chicken broth. :)
 

jeff_farkas

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If you bought the chicken breast already skinless and boneless, you spent way too much money, especially if it was one of those pre-packaged items. Buy whole chickens when they are on special at a local butcher shop, not a grocery store, and learn how to butcher it yourself. It's a simple thing to do and you'll save a fortune. You will also have a nice carcass at the end to use for chicken broth. :)

A good butcher is hard to find. I have one down the street from me and he's great. In fact he will cut up the chicken for you for a very small price.

Or you could do it yourself.
http://www.jmbutchershop.com/
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTkKXQkiOEg[/ame]
 

kmk108

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Just start cooking and buying less processed foods. Chicken, beef, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. Cut out the junk food, candy, chips, fried foods, ice cream etc.

That's the idea, but it's a lot easier said than done. I've eaten at least twice as many fast food meals this year than I have eaten home-cooked meals in the last 3 years. Yeah. That bad.
 

Barcham

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Just start cooking and buying less processed foods. Chicken, beef, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. Cut out the junk food, candy, chips, fried foods, ice cream etc.

We started getting catered lunches for free about 8 months ago. I used to think I was eating fairly health lunches (frozen foods, subway etc) and I'd usually pack on about 8-10 winter pounds as I don't run as much as I like to in the winters. This year I ran the least I ever have in the winter (minor injury+laziness) but I didn't gain any weight at all. I think it was not eating processed foods and occasional fast foods, the home cooked meals for lunch had a lot to do with it.

I can vouch for that. I was laid off last September and expected that I'd end up putting on the pounds sitting around the house. I've actually dropped about 20 pounds over the last 9 months or so because I've been cooking my own food for the most part and staying away from the usual junk I was eating all the time at work.
 

jeff_farkas

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That's the idea, but it's a lot easier said than done. I've eaten at least twice as many fast food meals this year than I have eaten home-cooked meals in the last 3 years. Yeah. That bad.

Check out slow cooker recipes.. a slow cooker is your best friend, IMO.

:)
 

kmk108

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If you bought the chicken breast already skinless and boneless, you spent way too much money, especially if it was one of those pre-packaged items. Buy whole chickens when they are on special at a local butcher shop, not a grocery store, and learn how to butcher it yourself. It's a simple thing to do and you'll save a fortune. You will also have a nice carcass at the end to use for chicken broth. :)

I'm in suburbia. The only butcher I know is the one at the grocery store chain :laugh2:

I think the closest butcher is at least 15 minutes away.
 

monkeyboy

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Check out slow cooker recipes.. a slow cooker is your best friend, IMO.

:)

Slow cookers saved my wife and I when our son was born. We never had much time to cook so I got up 15 minutes early and tossed some stuff in the slow cooker. The beautiful thing about it is all the soups we made were able to be frozen and eaten later.
 

Barcham

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A good butcher is hard to find. I have one down the street from me and he's great. In fact he will cut up the chicken for you for a very small price.

Or you could do it yourself.
J & M Family butcher
J & M's Butcher Shop - Oak Ridge, TN - YouTube

I guess it all depends on where you live. I have probably a dozen good butcher shops within 15 minutes drive of my apartment, including a great farmer's market. The thing is that it's a lot more convenient for most people to do their meat shopping at the usual grocery store instead of making a side trip.

I have a great little Asian market just next door to my local chain grocery store and I buy most of my vegetables there at about half the price. Especially things like green and red peppers which are not as visually perfect as those in the grocery store. They're not spoiled or damaged, just a bit off in their shape which makes no difference when I'm chopping them up for a meat sauce or stir fry.

It's surprising the deals and service you'll get when you make friends with your local butcher or smaller food store by shopping there on a regular basis.
 

TOMMYTHUNDERS

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I'm in suburbia. The only butcher I know is the one at the grocery store chain :laugh2:

I think the closest butcher is at least 15 minutes away.

go veg

tumblr_m4r07fijah1rsif11o1_500.jpg
 

jeff_farkas

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I guess it all depends on where you live. I have probably a dozen good butcher shops within 15 minutes drive of my apartment, including a great farmer's market. The thing is that it's a lot more convenient for most people to do their meat shopping at the usual grocery store instead of making a side trip.

I have a great little Asian market just next door to my local chain grocery store and I buy most of my vegetables there at about half the price. Especially things like green and red peppers which are not as visually perfect as those in the grocery store. They're not spoiled or damaged, just a bit off in their shape which makes no difference when I'm chopping them up for a meat sauce or stir fry.

It's surprising the deals and service you'll get when you make friends with your local butcher or smaller food store by shopping there on a regular basis.

Butchers are a dying breed, at least in my area. The local guy is just the best to deal with. I get a meat order each month and it's perfect for what I need. Oh and the funny thing is my Uncle and Grandfather were both butchers(meat cutters) and owned their own shops.

:)
 

Barcham

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Butchers are a dying breed, at least in my area. The local guy is just the best to deal with. I get a meat order each month and it's perfect for what I need. Oh and the funny thing is my Uncle and Grandfather were both butchers(meat cutters) and owned their own shops.

:)

Montreal is a city of foodies and we will never have a problem finding a butcher here. :)
 

artis_xe

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so true. once you eliminate animal fats and dairy products __ you can't go wrong. then it becomes a matter of watching sugars and salt intake.
it seems that the difficult part for most is eliminating the overly processed foods __ but eating healthy is a much simpler way of living (imho)

why wouldn't anyone want to live simpler ?
 

Barcham

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so true. once you eliminate animal fats and dairy products __ you can't go wrong. then it becomes a matter of watching sugars and salt intake.
it seems that the difficult part for most is eliminating the overly processed foods __ but eating healthy is a much simpler way of living (imho)

why wouldn't anyone want to live simpler ?

And then take all kinds of supplements to make sure your body is getting the nutrition it needs. I know vegetarians who spend more on supplements than I do on food.

Then again, they also tend to believe in 'homeopathic' medicine and follow the medical advice of such well known medical specialists as Suzanne Summers and Jenny McCarthy. :cool:
 

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