Headstock finish on a LP Standard - Fix?

BluesZep

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Hello there!

Well, I have a Gibson ’98 Standard, bought used on May. This guitar has a particularity, which I’ve already seen on other guitars, mainly 90’s. On headstock, near tuner posts, there’s a coat layer “loosed”, if I can say this. I don’t know how to explain this, or the correct form to say, if it is cracking, chipping, lifting, or whatever. I’ll post a picture to illustrate it.
There are cracked areas on low E and G tuners, but is visible just on low E. I don’t know how old are these cracks, but about a month ago, during a restring, I heard a cracking noise, and noticed a little increase of cracked area.

I’m not really bothered with this, but if there is a simple way to fix, I would like to know how to do. I’ve already thought in remove this “loosed” layer and apply some polish, but I think the better idea is to ask first. We have great luthiers on this board, so if there is a way to fix it, they will know.

P.S.: Please ignore any spelling or grammar mistakes, English is not my native language, and I try to do my best to write a long text like this.


Pictures:






Cheers
BZ
 

Roman

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Why it's doing that, is for this reason;

The black part of the headstock is a fiber laminate and the finish is lifting. The same is occurring at the logo but it is doing so because of shrinkage.
The fix is easy, but not unless you are used to finishing.

Acetone sprayed in an airbrush would melt it all back together, then it would have to be re-buffed.
The other method is to respray the face of the headstock. the solvents in the lacquer would melt the existing finish

I would say unless it drives you crazy, don't bother.
 

BluesZep

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Why it's doing that, is for this reason;

The black part of the headstock is a fiber laminate and the finish is lifting. The same is occurring at the logo but it is doing so because of shrinkage.
The fix is easy, but not unless you are used to finishing.

Acetone sprayed in an airbrush would melt it all back together, then it would have to be re-buffed.
The other method is to respray the face of the headstock. the solvents in the lacquer would melt the existing finish

I would say unless it drives you crazy, don't bother.
Thanks, Roman!

In fact, I have no experience with finishing. I would try to fix just if no "higher skills" or tools were needed.
Acetone has to be only sprayed? I'm asking it because I don't have an airbrush, and maybe I can apply it using a paintbrush, doing it carefully on lifted area. If there's no other way, I'll pass, no problem. I don't want to ruin it.

:thumb:
 

b-squared

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I would say leave it as is until it gets really annoying to look at.

Acetone will also remove the finish; using a brush could actually lift the finish. That would be bad.

Cheers!

BB
 

BluesZep

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Thanks, BB!
Ok, I undestand your point. A brush would not be a good idea.
So, I was thinking about another alternative. Maybe can I apply a few drops of acetone? Or would it make no difference?
 

Roman

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My suggestion was for informational purposes only.

The acetone trick is a new one for myself and takes a bit of practice. I was made aware of this thru BCR greg.

He had forwarded some info to me about doing a broken headstock repair with out refinishing.

There is a Genuis over the pond that had some of his work posted on this forum.

It is defenitely not a "try this at home" procedure.

I think the easiest "at home" thing you could do, is respray the headstock. The thinners in the new lacquer should melt the lifted finish

At Guitar ReRanch.com there is tutorial section on basic finishing, and they have the lacquer in aerosol cans as well.

Roman
 

BluesZep

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My suggestion was for informational purposes only.

The acetone trick is a new one for myself and takes a bit of practice. I was made aware of this thru BCR greg.

He had forwarded some info to me about doing a broken headstock repair with out refinishing.

There is a Genuis over the pond that had some of his work posted on this forum.

It is defenitely not a "try this at home" procedure.

I think the easiest "at home" thing you could do, is respray the headstock. The thinners in the new lacquer should melt the lifted finish

At Guitar ReRanch.com there is tutorial section on basic finishing, and they have the lacquer in aerosol cans as well.

Roman
Thanks so much, Mr. Roman. You are always a gentleman answering these questions with patience and education.
I'll follow your advices. I'll read a lot about finishing, and maybe after some practice (and just after some practice) I'll try to fix this using lacquer in aerosol.
Of course, take the guitar to a luthier is the right thing to do. Unfortunately, a good luthier here in Brazil is about 1,000 miles away from my home. That's why I'd like to do it myself.
Like I said before, it's not bothering me (just a little :D), so I can wait the right moment, or just live with it. I just hope that the area affected do not increase.

Thanks again!!

:thumb:
 

Dino

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Why it's doing that, is for this reason;

The black part of the headstock is a fiber laminate and the finish is lifting. The same is occurring at the logo but it is doing so because of shrinkage.
The fix is easy, but not unless you are used to finishing.

Acetone sprayed in an airbrush would melt it all back together, then it would have to be re-buffed.
The other method is to respray the face of the headstock. the solvents in the lacquer would melt the existing finish

I would say unless it drives you crazy, don't bother.
That's a cool trick! :)
I'm wondering ... wouldn't that work well for finish cracks too? :hmm:
How long does it normally take for the acetone to start melting the lacquer?
 


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