HE SHOT MY ARM OFF!!!!!!

Kamen_Kaiju

smiling politely as they dream of savage things
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My generation (born late 70's early 80's) was told pretty clearly we weren't special and were actually sort of insignificant. We were latchkey kids. We learned to cook and take care of ourselves because our parents weren't home.

When I was young I felt ripped off I didn't get a "good" childhood.

In retrospect maybe it was for the best. It made me and a lot of the people I know very strong and resilient.
 

CB91710

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I think there's a Naval Warfare facility just north of Norco, IIRC..
I'm not sure how active it is still with the way things have been scaling back.

The cows are pretty much gone... Eastvale is all new homes now, covering the areas north of Corona west of the 15.
Ontario Ranch is rapidly building homes on the old Ontario cow farms. There's still a few, but nothing like it was even 10 years ago.
The vinyards are gone... I think there's one left near the interchange.

They certainly aren't blowing shit up at the Naval facility. Aerospace in this valley effectively died with the closure of Norton and the explosion at Aerojet.
Long time Chino residents still remember the stories of the "Green Mist" when conditions were just right on a little dirt road off of Soquel Canyon.
Major superfund site.... rows of tall trees and a small hill obscure it from the million dollar homes that are built right up to the perimeter.
 

CB91710

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My generation (born late 70's early 80's) was told pretty clearly we weren't special and were actually sort of insignificant. We were latchkey kids. We learned to cook and take care of ourselves because our parents weren't home.

When I was young I felt ripped off I didn't get a "good" childhood.

In retrospect maybe it was for the best. It made me and a lot of the people I know very strong and resilient.
Told my boss that it was time for his wife to go back to work. His oldest can take care of his youngest.

He was shocked that I would suggest that for a 9 year old.

WTF? When I was 9 I had already been walking myself to and from school for a year and was using power tools unattended.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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Told my boss that it was time for his wife to go back to work. His oldest can take care of his youngest.

He was shocked that I would suggest that for a 9 year old.

WTF? When I was 9 I had already been walking myself to and from school for a year and was using power tools unattended.

same. And mowing the front and back lawn with a gas mower.
 

SteveC

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I spent a few years stationed at NAS Lemoore. I know of a lot of backwards areas out there.

OTOH, I spent a lot of time in Bellagio, and I just fucking love that smell.
 

ErictheRed

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yeah I agree with that. I just think in the older days 'the individual' wasn't such a selfish asshole.
A lot said in this thread that I could comment on, but I'll just focus on this. I've thought about this for years, and reminds me of the "best version of myself" and "accept myself" and "love myself for who I am" type of mantras. I do think that we should strive to love ourselves, but that doesn't mean loving ourselves or accepting ourselves with no regard to our flaws. It should mean taking a good, long look at ourselves, seeing the good and the bad, and striving to be the kind of person that we want to love, striving to be the kind of person that we can be proud of being. Too often it seems like this mindset just means that people don't actually try to improve themselves or admit their character flaws, it goes from "this is the way I am and I'm worthy of love and acceptance" to "this is just the way I am and I'm not going to change so deal with it."

I have a strong background in religion that I rarely bring up, but it reminds me of some of the good aspects of Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity that most other religions have forgotten about: Confession. I don't entirely agree with all of the religious aspects anymore, but there is a venue for admitting/confessing mistakes and striving to be a better person and asking for forgiveness. It doesn't have to be confessing that you just killed a man or robbed a bank, for most people it's admitting the little faults, the times you lost your temper with your kids, the times you were an ass to your wife, the time you didn't stand up for someone else because you didn't want your boss to get mad at you, etc. Admit the fault and learn how your actions affect the people that you love, and ask them for forgiveness (and God as well, but that's not my point here). It just seems to me that most people took the idea of "the individual" more "how can I be a better person?" and not "accept myself how I am already.". Over a long period of time that adds up to a huge difference.
 
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Dolebludger

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Back in the days when masks were mandated inside here, I went to my favorite liquor store with mask, sun glasses and a driver’s cap low on my forehead. Now, the guys there are my friends — I am a regular. But just for funny’s I said “cash drawer open and hands up!”. They said “go ahead, but there is nothing in the cash drawer!” You see, everybody there pays via CC, and so do I! So robbing that store would have yielded $0! Of course, this was all a joke, except the part about the empty cash drawer — that is truth.
 

THDNUT

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Back in the days when masks were mandated inside here, I went to my favorite liquor store with mask, sun glasses and a driver’s cap low on my forehead. Now, the guys there are my friends — I am a regular. But just for funny’s I said “cash drawer open and hands up!”. They said “go ahead, but there is nothing in the cash drawer!” You see, everybody there pays via CC, and so do I! So robbing that store would have yielded $0! Of course, this was all a joke, except the part about the empty cash drawer — that is truth.
Maybe they were there to clean out the rare whisky kiosk. You know, where they keep the $1,000, 25 year old Single Malt and rare brandy?


Have you ever been in a Total Wine store? They have a locked kiosk with about 30 or 40 bottles that would cost you probably $85,000 to buy one of every bottle in it. The highest priced spirit I've seen in there was close to $6,000 for a 750 ml bottle. It was some sort of really old Scotch.

Seriously though, I think they were there for money.
 

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