Half hearted question on best way to age/relic

XpensiveWino

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For my two cents, the scotch brite idea is where it's at. I prefer the 3M pads. They have grit ratings like sand paper.

If you're sure you're into this plan, here's how I would do it.

Check out this video. It's me working on a butcher block table.

At 8 mins I start talking about the 3M pads and the grits. On your guitar try the lightest (white I believe) first. *Lightly* try that in the area you want to relic. You can always do more, but you can't undo too much. If the white isn't getting enough removed for you, go up in coarseness. Once you get the finish removed to the point to you want, you need to sand/polish with those pads from coarse to to fine. In that video watch what I'm saying about the perpendicular directions, then polish in circular motion. After those pads, I'd get a set of 3M polishing papers and go through the coarse to fine wet finish/polish process. Basically get the seam from the exposed wood area to the finished nitro smooth and clean.

Once you get all the way through the papers and coarse to fine (use some polishing compound and meguiar's after all of that), the whole area is going to be really shiny. At that point, then get on to continuing to play it. It'll scuff, 'satinize' , etc... on it's own from there. The exposed wood area will also continue to grow in size after that point naturally from your playing.
 

XpensiveWino

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Sorry, I thought it would just put the link in my post, not embed the video. Sorry if it seems obnoxious. Not my intention.
 

CB91710

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Sorry, I thought it would just put the link in my post, not embed the video. Sorry if it seems obnoxious. Not my intention.
Forum automatically does that.
You may be able to prevent it by adding the "noparse" BBCode flags, not sure.
But it's cool, I prefer to launch the video in the forum window.
 

BadPenguin

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Just play the damn thing. It will eventually relic naturally.
 

Michael Matyas

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Wear a denim jacket and play the living daylights out of it. If you want buckle rash the way to get that is self-evident. Nothing beats the real thing!
 

Tdurden032

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Just my two cents here, but as many others have said - just play it and let it do its own thing. For every one “good” relic job that I’ve seen, there be been 50 terrible ones where the guitar just looks awful from someone trying to artificially sped up the process. I’d just play it and enjoy the journey - the well loved-look will show itself soon enough
 

bum

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Play it while wearing a suit of armour / rolling down sand dunes
 

kakerlak

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Just because I haven't seen it thrown out there yet, have you tried just polishing out the hazy spot? Regular guitar polish might not touch it, but going down to something like Meguiar's #2 to buff out the haze/scratches, then #7 to bring the shine back up might bring it right back.
 

1970SG

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Take all the strings and electronics out, lay it in the backyard for 23 days, rain, snow, sun etc... then, wipe it down with a hotdog. Lay it back out in the sun to dry. Once it’s good and dry, play it with a bare chest and arms. The friction of your skin with the hot dog juice (primarily because of the MSG and Amonium Benzoprionide in the dried hot dog juice) the guitar will magically look relic’d without you actually relic’ing it because you don’t want to be told how to actually relic. I’ve seen hundreds of thousands of guys and gals do this age old technique over the last 50 years.
As a matter of fact, Clapton and Billy Gibbons were probably the first to do this.
 

Mini Forklift Ⓥ

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I'm always that whenever someone says they want to relic something, it's like a calling card for pointless and unhelpful replies

The OP has already clearly stated that it's a guitar that is being played and it is in 'players grade' condition; also the fact that it's a 2006 LP lends itself to the fact that this might be an issue that is not going to be quickly resolved just by continuing to play it

I for one look forward to seeing the pics once the top has been refinished. Who are you sending it to? Good luck and I hope the you're happy with the outcome when you get it back
 

Brek

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I was kinda hoping for some techniques to be posted as replies, a couple sound fun, wearing a wet’n’dry tee shirt for starters :rofl:
Cue wet t-shirt pictures.
 

Mr Insane

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I'm always that whenever someone says they want to relic something, it's like a calling card for pointless and unhelpful replies

The OP has already clearly stated that it's a guitar that is being played and it is in 'players grade' condition; also the fact that it's a 2006 LP lends itself to the fact that this might be an issue that is not going to be quickly resolved just by continuing to play it

I for one look forward to seeing the pics once the top has been refinished. Who are you sending it to? Good luck and I hope the you're happy with the outcome when you get it back
They must have missed the "half hearted question" in the thread title.

From what I understand about the lacquer used in that period, they don't age as gracefully as a vintage piece.

It is Sweetwater doing the refinish. Just a standard finish, no aging. I'm only a 2 hour drive from Sweetwater and didn't feel like risk shipping it anywhere. I also considered having the luthier on the Stewmac videos do it, but finding info on his shop was a bit tricky.
 

theusualdan

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They must have missed the "half hearted question" in the thread title.

From what I understand about the lacquer used in that period, they don't age as gracefully as a vintage piece.

It is Sweetwater doing the refinish. Just a standard finish, no aging. I'm only a 2 hour drive from Sweetwater and didn't feel like risk shipping it anywhere. I also considered having the luthier on the Stewmac videos do it, but finding info on his shop was a bit tricky.
Sweetwater as in the mail order music place, sweetwater? I had no idea they did refinishing! What color did you decide to do the top?
 


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