Guitar "Bonding" is Real

decoy205

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I think it’s real. That’s why players have a “number 1” usually. I found out I connect with Les Pauls more than strat types in most cases. I have played a few Les Pauls that didn’t have it for me. I got lucky with the 3 I own. They have “it” for me.
 

endial

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That is, admittedly, a VERY handsome guitar.

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Not so crazy. Enjoy.
 

Pancreas

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Guitar bonding is absolutely real, at least for some players. It is completely subjective however so you'll get a wide range of responses. I've moved through a lot of guitars in the past few years to find what I want and now I know, sounds like you may also.
I completely agree!
 

Dilver

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Sometimes all it takes is a slight bridge height adjustment (nice that you can do it on the fly with most Gibsons) or maybe a tweak of the truss rod (again, pretty easy on a Gibson, usually).

I rotate through my guitars almost daily. They all feel different and I am always fine tuning. A good winter setup can go to $h!t pretty easily in the summer and vice versa. Some are more sensitive than others, too, requiring more frequent tweaks.

Point being, I think almost any guitar can be adjusted to being in the zone and bonded with. JMHO.
Agreed. Unless you’re used to setting up your own guitars, the whole “bonding” thing becomes a little sketchy. The guitar was set up by someone else to play how they thought it felt best. If I like my action higher and stiffer, set up a guitar that way, and then hand it to someone who likes it low and loose, they’re not going to bond with it.

Some guitars just need small adjustments to play their best. Others require tweaking of a number of things - nut slots, bridge and tail piece height, truss rod, fret leveling. Sometimes, it’s what the GUITAR likes, meaning some guitars sound better set up a certain way.

I’m glad you (OP) found what you wanted in the Epi Les Paul. Wouldn’t be my first choice, but sometimes you just get lucky.
 

Peter M

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Excluding anything seriously defective, I can "bond" with any Gibson Les Paul once I set it up to my liking.
 

Pancreas

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no. You are very smart.
Thank You, I've done a few upgrades to the Epiphone, and now it's on-par with any Gibson I've ever played. Tonally, even better. My ego isn't as such that I need to display a certain name on the headstock to appease myself or others. it plays great, sounds great, looks FANTASTIC, and my wife will now have a better Christmas.
 

GrandJunction

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For my 2-cents, bonding with any instrument is extremely important - the amount on the pricetag and the name on the headstock makes NO difference . . . once you have found YOUR instrument, it's like magic. Play and enjoy!
 

Deftone

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Sometimes all it takes is a slight bridge height adjustment (nice that you can do it on the fly with most Gibsons) or maybe a tweak of the truss rod (again, pretty easy on a Gibson, usually).

I rotate through my guitars almost daily. They all feel different and I am always fine tuning. A good winter setup can go to $h!t pretty easily in the summer and vice versa. Some are more sensitive than others, too, requiring more frequent tweaks.

Point being, I think almost any guitar can be adjusted to being in the zone and bonded with. JMHO.

100% agree on every word.
 

redcoats1976

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i have been thinking about moving my 2017 gibby GT tribute for a gibby 50s standard.maybe i just havent found the right one but so far none of them play like the lightweight 8 pound tribute.forgot to mention my epi special in TV yellow gives it a run for the money and only cost $379.
 

rjwilson37

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Don't confuse Bonding with the Honeymoon phase either. Sometimes you think it's an instant bond with your new guitar, but it can be mistaken for the Honeymoon phase with your new purchase. I totally love and have bonded with both of these new guitars; they are both fantastic. Let's hope this does not go away, I am having so much fun playing them daily.

IMG-4994.jpg
 

Tele295

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I sold all my Gibson Les Pauls (not all by choice) but kept my early 00’s Epiphone LPC triple pickup. There is something about those Epiphones, especially the pickups, but I found the Les Paul humbucker sound I was looking for :)
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Pancreas

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Don't confuse Bonding with the Honeymoon phase either. Sometimes you think it's an instant bond with your new guitar, but it can be mistaken for the Honeymoon phase with your new purchase. I totally love and have bonded with both of these new guitars; they are both fantastic. Let's hope this does not go away, I am having so much fun playing them daily.

View attachment 579629
You sir, have a pair of beauties there! I completely understand what you're saying. I've been thru enough guitars over the years to tell the difference, and I've spent many, many hours playing this beauty to know that is a great instrument, worth much more (at least to me) than it's current sale price.
 

1allspub

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Bonding is real IMO and IME. The 3 Gibson LPs I have now (2016 Trad, 2018 R8, 2010 LPC Silverburst) I've had for long enough to be over the honeymoon phase (6.5 years, 3.5 years, and 1.5 years respectively)... and while each is different, I am definitely bonded to each.

I've owned many more (18 total Gibson LPs of various makes and ages--including other RIs) over the years, but it's boiled down to these 3 for me. The R8 (which I bought new) gives a magnificent vintage vibe and has the vintage tone to back up that vibe. The Silverburst (which I got in trade) is a hard rock machine (doesn't hurt that I have set it up to be so, ha!) and the Trad (which I bought new) kinda sits in between the other two.

Anyway, I've bought and sold and traded a lot... largely because after the honeymoon phase was over I realized that there was no actual bonding. But these 3... yeah, definitely bonded with each (in its own way).
:jam::jam::jam:
 

KelvinS1965

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i have been thinking about moving my 2017 gibby GT tribute for a gibby 50s standard.maybe i just havent found the right one but so far none of them play like the lightweight 8 pound tribute.forgot to mention my epi special in TV yellow gives it a run for the money and only cost $379.
Two years ago I took my 2011 60s Tribute GT into a shop to get a PX value for it and also to play it against a 2020 50s Standard GT with P90s. I came home with my Tribute, partly due to the weight and also that for 5 times the price it didn't seem to sound or feel any 'better' to me. I know plenty on here say they like a heavier guitar, but for me that was just too much (I always play stood up even when practicing at home). Turned out to be a good decision because I've since developed a back issue that makes playing my heavier guitars painful (and yes I have bought wide/padded straps for them).

Going back to the OP: I find that if I play any particular one of my guitars for a few days, then it becomes my favourite and others feel a bit off. I've lost track of the number of times I've talked myself in and out of buying another neck for a Telecaster body I have because I play the one with a fat neck and 9.5" radius for a while and get used to that. Then I play my Cabronita which has a medium neck and 7.25" radius and think that one is 'perfect'.

In truth I'd have been better off sticking to playing one guitar, but I love the different pickups I have across different guitars (Strat, Tele, Cabronita with TV Jones, LP with P90s, SG with humbuckers and recently a Rickenbacker with 'high gain' pickups).

The only one I've never bonded with was a Gretsch. I polished it up ready to sell last year and have tried it briefly recently (having not missed playing it) and I still don't get on with it. That's good because I've already removed the pickups I 'upgraded' it with on to the Cabronita I built: That feels familiar and comfortable, since it's basically a Tele, but sounds like I was hoping the Gretsch would.
 

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