Good Wood Years?

raunch

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I hear drummers talk for days on end about the good vs bad wood of their drum stricks.

Apparently Led Zep's Bonzo's tone came from drum sticks made from special old wood taken from a tree in Sherwood forest that lived around the time of Robin Hood, or so they say. Just imagine if he had of used "normal wood", there would be no Black Dog :(
 

stillaliveandwell

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I think that often that phrase is used to describe years that people believe had particularly strong flame maple.
 

paco1976

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So we're making wood grow more quickly...:hmm:

Is this the solution to the deforestation of the Rain Forest?

Is Monsanto involved?
Do you know people grow trees? Not only corn and barley? Pine trees and maple, mahogany, anything that gives money, if you put all the care it needs it will grow better.
Forestry is about getting more wood, earlier and easier than what you would get in the wild you know? And also to have all the trees altogether in the same place, unlike in the wild.
It grows quicker but the quality is lower. And yes, they use specific genetics not whatever the wind blows.
Incredible I am explaining this...

Where did you read this? And how widespread was this practice?
Not widespread at all, I actually read that from Jerry Auerswald, back in the late 80s he used absolutely the best wood available in the world. His guitars were $20k at the time and his customer people like Prince. It is an exaggeration, but it made him a name.
Probably the woods used by Gibson in the 50's were air dried no less than 25 years.
To my knowledge the more a wood is air dried the better (more stable is the wood), some luthiers are more extreme than others.

Yes, someone certainly is misinformed.
There is a guy in the forum who worked at Gibson in the 70s, he explained the kind of wood used in the early/mid 70's. This was wildwood, old growth, wood you cannot get today, it doesn't exist. They used that until it was finished, the reason for the pancake body was to use this wood as long as they could because they could not get it any longer. It was not going to be available anymore.
Woods in the early/mid 70s Gibson are amazing, to me that is a fact, I know the Norlins well.
 

colchar

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Do you know people grow trees?
No, nature grows trees.


Not only corn and barley?

Dafuq to ingredients in booze have to do with this?




Pine trees and maple, mahogany, anything that gives money
Trees give money? Where the hell are these magical money trees????



Forestry is about getting more wood, earlier and easier than what you would get in the wild you know?

No, actually, forestry is the science of managing, maintaining, and using forests - hence the name.



And also to have all the trees altogether in the same place, unlike in the wild.

So trees aren't together in the same place in wild forests, woods, etc.?


It grows quicker but the quality is lower.

So you're saying we have genetically engineered trees to grow more quickly? I'll ask again - is Monsanto involved and might this be a solution to the deforestation taking place in the Rain Forest?



And yes, they use specific genetics not whatever the wind blows.

Oh really? Please explain tree genetics to us.



Incredible I am explaining this...
Yes it is but the irony of this statement is completely lost on you.



I actually read that from Jerry Auerswald, back in the late 80s he used absolutely the best wood available in the world.

According to who?

Oh. Wait. Ed Roman thought he made good stuff and we all know that Ed Roman was a world authority :laugh2:


Auerswald Guitars - Ed Roman Guitars



His guitars were $20k at the time

A high price tag does not indicate higher quality. If you think it does then you are a marketer's dream.


and his customer people like Prince.
So?


It is an exaggeration, but it made him a name.
Huh?


Probably the woods used by Gibson in the 50's were air dried no less than 25 years.

Oh really?



To my knowledge the more a wood is air dried the better (more stable is the wood), some luthiers are more extreme than others.
Based on your comments thus far you should be careful about using the term 'knowledge'.


There is a guy in the forum who worked at Gibson in the 70s, he explained the kind of wood used in the early/mid 70's. This was wildwood, old growth, wood you cannot get today, it doesn't exist.

So no wild, old wood exists in the world any longer?


Woods in the early/mid 70s Gibson are amazing, to me that is a fact, I know the Norlins well.
:lol:

Norlins are fine guitars. To claim the wood was amazing is hilarious.
 

Dica

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Dude, you can make two Les Paul's out of the same two trees and have one that is a real cannon and one that is a dog. There is no "good wood years", there's big sounding guitars, dead sounding guitars and everything in between.
This is the truth. I have heard to many Les Pauls from every decade that sounded just as good as any 50s guitar.

We seam to mix up the players talent,quirks and chops.
For the guitar sound.

Now the best Les Pauls i have played have been Old Tokais (these also tend to lack any deadspots).
These lack all the blanket sounds that many historics have.
And this has been A/B by me over and over again.

Still a good Historic with a bright sound and long sustain can also be incredible.

But to the point dont be shocked if you find a 1996 Ugly Studio with all the wrong features sounding like a huge tonemonster with loads of sustain and bright teleish sound.

Just listen Led Zeppelin 2012 Celebration Day every Les Paul there sounds very much alike.
 

Bobby Mahogany

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1992 Vintage Sunburst Les Paul Standard.
PM me for the serial number.
 

d1m1

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officially the "good wood years" are 1993-1995 where gibson spend ridiculous amounts of money to get good wood for it´s new founded custom shop.

but if you ask me, each year has excelent guitars and also dogs. some guitars have it and some dont. no matter if 93-95, or cc´s, or inspired by´s, or true historics, or what ever. thats all BS. just find a good one and enjoy.
 

ARandall

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officially the "good wood years" are 1993-1995 where gibson spend ridiculous amounts of money to get good wood for it´s new founded custom shop.
Doesn't matter how much you spend on wood, there is NO predictor of good tone......fullstop.
Hence the 93-95 year will be just like any other.

In fact the worst LP I had by far was from 93. Kinda screws up that particular example now doesn't it!!

Anyhow, your later paragraph was probably your most relevant.
 

Inside Guy

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There is no such thing as good years or bad years when it comes to "Wood".

It would be like asking God: "What years did you make the most beautiful women?" It's an invalid question.

Judge every guitar based on it's own. Don't look at the serial number, don't look at the truss rod cover. In fact the less you look at the guitar, the better....you are supposed to LISTEN to it.
 

Leroy

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Guitar tone is not scientifically measurable. Why? Because tone is personal.
There is no such this as the "best tone". Only the best to your ears.

Your fingers will have a much bigger impact than any wood, or year of manufacture ever will.

Leroy
 

JCM900MkIII

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Lol, and that has nothing to do with which guitars are good or bad.
No, it's magic which is responsible for quality wood.
Magic kilns, luthiers which went to Hogwarts etc.


Dry too fast and it splits, cracks and checks.
Dry too slow and it will warp, stain and dry unevenly.
Storage can give the same negative effects if not done properly.



But I would like to hear your explanation though.... what makes good tonewood?


P.S. (I'm in the camp of :"Tonewood has nothing to do with tone, but with stability, looks and ease of work" (pretty lonely here b.t.w.)
 

SLA1

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No, it's magic which is responsible for quality wood.
Magic kilns, luthiers which went to Hogwarts etc.


Dry too fast and it splits, cracks and checks.
Dry too slow and it will warp, stain and dry unevenly.
Storage can give the same negative effects if not done properly.



But I would like to hear your explanation though.... what makes good tonewood?


P.S. (I'm in the camp of :"Tonewood has nothing to do with tone, but with stability, looks and ease of work" (pretty lonely here b.t.w.)
You mean unplugged or amplified?
 

riffhard

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The year does not matter.
The secret usually only passed from druids mouth to druids ear is ........























the tree has do be cut in a fullmoon night at friday 13. while 13 fairies are dancing.
 

Jock

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Gibson Marketing dept will tell it was the years when they had to dramatically increase the costs of their Historic's because of the lack of good wood.
 

RRfireblade

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Best wood? Turn of the last century. It's been all downhill for the last 100 + years.
 


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