Goldtop popped up locally: is this authentic?

Cjsinla

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2014
Messages
4,481
Reaction score
3,920
In reality, their are a number of things that they got right on this fake. But the heastock is a mess and the butcher-block body are clear giveaways.
 

jake_and_elwood

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
26
Reaction score
43
crazing like that is faked. they do it before the paint cures. Natural crazing occurs over time, subjected to lots of temperature and humidity changes. With that environment comes rust, which I do not see. So, IMHO, this guitar is spurious. Plus, those inlays just look wrong.
 

truckermde

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
14,919
Reaction score
16,325
Definitely fake, yes. Back and headstock shots confirm it. Multi-piece body, no headstock wings.

It's good that you requested the extra photos (and that the seller sent them). Sometimes, funky photo angles and reflections can make a real Gibson look "off". Add in a few replaced parts and it's easy to rush to judgment. However, now you know for sure.
/\ /\ This /\ /\
 

KS 5150

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2010
Messages
2,418
Reaction score
1,900
Maybe my eyes aren't great but looks like the 'Les Paul Model' is a decal/transfer?



You can see the outline of it from where it's been placed onto the headstock; it's blacker and doesn't have any of the white crap that's on the rest of the headstock
This. Looks like someone added the Gibson decal, and also added the LES PAUL MODEL decal. The headstock decal delaminated, while the LPM decal hasn't...yet.
 

ndnblooze

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
301
Reaction score
138
Fake is a little harsh. It looks like a “buddy” or junior luthier made someone a Duane Allman GT and they wanted it reliced. May be in initials carved in somewhere. I’d buy it just to hang on the wall. I would pay about $600 for it.
 

Kev-O

Junior Member
Joined
May 15, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
53 R/I would have p90’s and a wrap tail piece, no?
 

no jimmy p

Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
62
Reaction score
54
The best thing to do is get the guitar in your hands , check the pick-up cavities .
The nut looks like a replacement to me . Looks like there something printed between the D and G strings on the nut .
Other than that , it deserves an in hand inspection .
 

jk60LPTH

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
27
Reaction score
32
With that environment comes rust, which I do not see.
Not universally true. I have a 1967 SG, I know the entire history of it because I bought it in early 1968. The nitro has crazing, no doubt from changes in temperature and humidity (not nearly as bad as the subject of this thread, but still significant), I dragged it around the US, Europe and N Africa. Often strapped on the back of my motorcycle, carried through the drenching rain in the case, went through the heat of Africa to the November cold of Rome, after a few hours in the unpressurized, unheated hold of a plane. I lived in the cold and dryness of the snowbelt in NY, and I lived in the heat and humidity of SW Florida. During it's life I've used Gibson guitar wax on it only a couple of times, and I really haven't taken care of it as well as I should have because it was a $300 guitar when I bought it and I had no idea how good it really was because it was my first guitar and I didn't have anything to compare it to. And, obviously I now feel guilty about that. However, to your point, the hardware- Klusons, bridge, trem, pickups, etc. do not have any rust on them, they're not bright and shiny, they have a little bit of the patina that comes with age and could be cleaned and polished off, the pickup covers are still shiny, but with the very faint scratching that comes with using a pick. The screw slots are darkened from loss of their plating, and the pick guard 'horn' tips are slightly turned up, either from the uneven dimensional aging of the black and white layers, or from heat. The only thing I've ever really felt important to do over the years is to periodically remove the truss rod nut and lube it, so it doesn't seize.
I agree with everything else you said, except for that rusty hardware inevitably occurs when humidity and temperature changes cause the nitro to craze... unless you usually leave your guitar out on the porch in the rain... what is inevitable is that the frets will show obvious wear if you play your guitar regularly,
:)
 

octavedoctor

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2013
Messages
12
Reaction score
16
Hey all, new member here.

This guitar popped up locally, and I'm wondering if it's authentic or not. It's listed for a grand and some change. I just asked the seller for a serial number, but hasn't replied yet. Can you tell from these pics?

Help?





It’s genuine. You don’t get reticulation on the headstock like that except with the vulcanised fibreboard that Gibson use. Inlays, checking on the top (characteristic of aged nitro cellulose). Binding over the fret ends. The copiers don’t do it that way. The nut has been replaced with a “Tusq” nut, so that bit is not genuine. If it’s a fake, someone’s done a really good job.

My best guess is early to mid nineties Gibson, but it’s just a wild guess based on having seen quite a few of these in a 45 year career repairing them.
 

Tinpan

Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2010
Messages
72
Reaction score
76
Its got a Nashville Bridge....not an AB-1....to start with....
 

captdan61

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2011
Messages
94
Reaction score
63
all the comments above seem valid but Gibson has made an awful lot of guitars and some do look substantially better than others I would want to look at the cavities and you got to look at the back if you have the headstock and all that like every one of them said but the bottom line is if you picked it up and you like it and the price is right and it's cheap enough would you enjoy owning it in plain it? Regardless of whether it's a Gibson or not? I want God to play what was represented as a 1950s Les Paul it turned out to be a 1957 Junior but if I could have afforded that guitar I would have bought it and not giving a shit what it was. it was lightweight and it felt terrific. but it would be nice to know if it was fake or not
 

guitaroholic

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Messages
236
Reaction score
215
It’s genuine. You don’t get reticulation on the headstock like that except with the vulcanised fibreboard that Gibson use. Inlays, checking on the top (characteristic of aged nitro cellulose). Binding over the fret ends. The copiers don’t do it that way. The nut has been replaced with a “Tusq” nut, so that bit is not genuine. If it’s a fake, someone’s done a really good job.

My best guess is early to mid nineties Gibson, but it’s just a wild guess based on having seen quite a few of these in a 45 year career repairing them.
It may not be 100% fake but it's definitely not 100% genuine either.
Could be something like this:

My issues:
- No wings, even if someone sanded the back and put their own (weird) serial number on.
- Inlay shape at 17, 19, 21 frets... Gibson does not have the lines on the side arched like that. They are (almost) straight on those frets.
- Frets appear to be JUMBO?
- The black stripe/color between binding and (multipiece) body. My uneducated guess, someone added the binding to a Studio body

Looks like a waterslide Les Paul decal, but Gibson did use those at times. Even within the same range of instruments. Like the 2005-2008 Standard Faded, there are versions with waterslide and versions with screen print.
 
Last edited:

dasherf17

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
Messages
9
Reaction score
3
Hey all, new member here.

This guitar popped up locally, and I'm wondering if it's authentic or not. It's listed for a grand and some change. I just asked the seller for a serial number, but hasn't replied yet. Can you tell from these pics?

Help?





Here's my take...a Les Paul for a grand? What's the guy's email?! I would snatch it up now and ask questions later...jus' me...
 


Latest Threads



Top