gibson truss rod help

Joined
Jul 27, 2020
Messages
36
Reaction score
17
looking for some info on whats the best way to cut the curved channel for the single action rod seen the stew mac vid on youtube is that the best way to go or a curved router jig, what do other guys and girls do. first time trying a single action rod trying to go original thanks in advance
 

nuance97

Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
3,025
Reaction score
2,782
The originals in the ‘50s and prior had a straight channel that tapers going towards the nut. They weren’t curved until later in the 60’s
 

pshupe

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
5,693
Reaction score
6,112
The originals in the ‘50s and prior had a straight channel that tapers going towards the nut. They weren’t curved until later in the 60’s


It may have coincided with some slimmer neck profiles on some of their "new" double cut models like the LP (SG)? Just speculation here as I have been looking at some of those vintage guitars and the standard slanted truss rod slot would come precariously close to exiting the neck carve, especially dup on those higher frets.

Regards Peter.
 
Last edited:

Marty M.

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
317
Reaction score
142
looking for some info on whats the best way to cut the curved channel for the single action rod seen the stew mac vid on youtube is that the best way to go or a curved router jig, what do other guys and girls do. first time trying a single action rod trying to go original thanks in advance


Take a look at the jig used in Fender style necks at tdpri.com. I have also cut a straight channel and then glued down curved ramps that I previously sanded to a curved shape. They are thin and require a thin tool to place them down in the channel. I have also done channels with just a curve at the truss rod nut end too, in Gibson style necks. The issue is the truss rod nut sometimes sticks up into the peghead veneer. You have to do a good side view drawing and have your ducks in a row.
 

cmjohnson

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,236
Reaction score
2,959
There's no reason the channel HAS to be curved. It's just fine if the slot gets deeper toward the neck but is straight, and what little material ends up being missing as a result will be missing from the thicker part of the neck anyway, so no worries there. What IS important, though, is that the filler on top of the truss rod pushes the rod into a curve with the deepest part of the curve in the middle of the rod. This makes the rod MUCH more efficient than a straight rod.

I use the PRS style rod, myself. It's still just one piece of steel rod. But it works on the turnbuckle principle. Left hand threads on one end, right hand threads on the other. Flat nuts inserted in the neck. Adjuster nut welded on AFTER the top end nut is screwed onto the truss rod. I still install it curved like a Gibson rod. The odds of needing to add backbow are close to zero, but it'll do it if I need it.
 

failsafe306

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2016
Messages
476
Reaction score
438
There's no reason the channel HAS to be curved. It's just fine if the slot gets deeper toward the neck but is straight, and what little material ends up being missing as a result will be missing from the thicker part of the neck anyway, so no worries there. What IS important, though, is that the filler on top of the truss rod pushes the rod into a curve with the deepest part of the curve in the middle of the rod. This makes the rod MUCH more efficient than a straight rod.

I use the PRS style rod, myself. It's still just one piece of steel rod. But it works on the turnbuckle principle. Left hand threads on one end, right hand threads on the other. Flat nuts inserted in the neck. Adjuster nut welded on AFTER the top end nut is screwed onto the truss rod. I still install it curved like a Gibson rod. The odds of needing to add backbow are close to zero, but it'll do it if I need it.
I would imagine that using a curved channel on a rod that spins, a la PRS, would be harder to turn than if a straight channel were used. I do my rods PRS style like you do, but with a straight channel. Have you done it both ways, and if so, were there any functional differences between the straight and curved channels?
 

cmjohnson

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
3,236
Reaction score
2,959
The rod may be a little harder to twist. Not much, but you DO need to be sure that you put the rod in a sleeve and be sure to grease the rod! I made that mistake once and have to pop the fingerboard off that neck and remedy a frozen rod situation!
 

Latest Threads



Top