Gibson Patent Number Decals that Don't Glow Under Black Light?

lawdaddy21

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So here's the straightforward question: Did any of the "Patent Number" decals on the bottom of '60s T-Top pickups not actually glow?

Here's the backstory. I bought a T-Top pickup that appeared 100% original. In the photos I'm attaching, note that the two glaring items that aren't original I have done since purchasing. I replaced the lead with a vintage-correct 2-wire (the one on it was also 2 wire but was short), and added some cloth pickup tape (the guitar this came out of appears to have had a lot of water damage and some of the paper tape around the coils was so brittle that it fell apart while replacing the lead). Everything looks to check out, except that when I shine the black light on the decal it doesn't glow like the other T-Top I have on hand. I'll note that this particular pickup has the rounded corner feet, which would make it a later '60s pickup--and maybe the decals changed towards the late '60s such that they didn't glow? It does look like the current decal could have been applied over the location of an earlier decal, as you can see a different residue line to the left of the current decal. That all said, there's really not a reason to fake a sticker on a T-Top base is there? It's the least valuable of all of the Gibson decal pickups (and you know it's from the '60s because it isn't a stamped number base).

I asked the seller about it, and he showed me the guitar he pulled it from (a very badly deteriorated LP Junior knockoff that he had purchased and that had been "customized" in the '70s to make these pickups fit).

I just don't see someone bothering to put on a fake decal back in the '70s--or frankly why anyone would bother to put it on the pickup now when it has a T-Top bobbin and isn't a stamped base.

Can someone educate me on what I'm missing and/or if there were decals that just didn't glow?

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t-top 2.jpg
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lawdaddy21

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While that may be the case for paint or other items, the original "Patent Applied For" and "Patent No." stickers glow (it's a common test to identify a fake PAF sticker). But, with this particular pickup there's no reason to fake the sticker. As such, I'm wondering if maybe the sticker changed toward the end of the 60's (68 or 69 maybe) such that they don't glow. Alternatively, could water damage/moisture impact the adhesive so that it doesn't glow?
 

lwchafin

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So you're selling them and want to represent that they're refurbed late 60s T-top pickups, or are you keeping them and just trying to reassure yourself that you didn't get ripped off? Oh, and if you're keeping them, how do they sound?
 

JLvintage

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Man, thats weird. Even way back before the internet we all bought based on our own experience and gut instinct. Today, with all the info you'd think it would be easier but I see people asking strangers. I dont buy a thing that I dont have my own knowledge about and still to this day trust the ole instinct. If it smells, I walk and most certainly wouldnt care what a stranger had to say. I see people crying fake over good stuff and buying garbage thats not even good fake cuz it was pumped by certain people. Its crazy. Just my opinion.
 

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