Gibson Les Paul Traditional 2019

SloeGin

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Hey guys,

I'm interested in buying a Les Paul Traditional 2019 Tobacco Burst.
How are you guys liking it?
How does the G and D string stay in tune with these "Vintage Deluxe w/ Keystone Buttons " tuners?

Thanks!
 

jstarr823

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Hey guys,

I'm interested in buying a Les Paul Traditional 2019 Tobacco Burst.
How are you guys liking it?
How does the G and D string stay in tune with these "Vintage Deluxe w/ Keystone Buttons " tuners?

Thanks!
Didn't play that particular guitar. You should and get back to us with your thoughts. Cheers!
 

mudface

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Hey guys,

I'm interested in buying a Les Paul Traditional 2019 Tobacco Burst.
How are you guys liking it?
How does the G and D string stay in tune with these "Vintage Deluxe w/ Keystone Buttons " tuners?

Thanks!
:hmm: My personal experience with G and D strings tuning issues has always been poorly shaped/string slot cut nuts..... never tuners themselves.

2019 may be the last year for Traditionals with the 60 and 50 series Standards pretty much taking their place....

I haven’t heard that much about them....
 

edselman

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I own a 2019 Traditional. It’s flawless and has no tuning issues. As stated, tuning issues with most guitars result from poorly cut nuts not from tuners. I must say that if I were to do it again I would have waited and bought a new “Originals” Standard.
 

danzego

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I also have a 2019 Traditional (Tobacco Burst). It’s a killer guitar. I don’t have tuning issues, but I also got a pro setup not long after buying it. Any Gibson is prone to tuning issues and you’ll definitely want to make sure to have the nut slotted properly.

With that said, unless there’s something very particular to the Traditional that you want (like the neck profile), you may want to look at the new Standards.
 

Rob the Photog

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I have a 2016 Traditional, and it’s my #1, desert island, never-going-to-sell-it guitar. I was able to A/B a 2019 Traditional and a Standard 50’s at Guitar Center a couple of months ago, and I was very impressed with both models. The neck on the ‘19 felt exactly like the neck on my ‘16 (and that’s important because I think the necks on 2017 Traditionals were noticeably thinner, so in my experience they’re not all the same from year to year).

Between the 2 at GC, the neck profiles were very similar, but the Standard 50’s was slightly beefier. The Traditional has just the slightest flat area along the spine of the neck, while the 50’s felt more round all the way around. I honestly would have never noticed it if I hadn't been scrutinizing their neck profiles and comparing them side by side. They both felt great to me.

The other noticeable difference between them was the binding. The new models from the Original Collection, which includes the Standard 50’s, has much thinner binding, more in line with Historic spec. I have to admit that the Standard 50’s was much more comfortable than the Traditional in this regard; the Trad wasn’t bad, but the 50’s was better.

I like Les Pauls from the 80’s and 90’s, so the things I like the most about the Traditional model line are the 9-hole weight relief, the Nashville bridges, and the larger headstocks. The thing I liked most about the Standard 50’s was the thinner neck binding. Aside from that, they’re pretty much the same model.

TL;DR: The Standard 50’s and 2019 Traditional are very similar guitars, so you may want to try both models.
 

danzego

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I have a 2016 Traditional, and it’s my #1, desert island, never-going-to-sell-it guitar. I was able to A/B a 2019 Traditional and a Standard 50’s at Guitar Center a couple of months ago, and I was very impressed with both models. The neck on the ‘19 felt exactly like the neck on my ‘16 (and that’s important because I think the necks on 2017 Traditionals were noticeably thinner, so in my experience they’re not all the same from year to year).

Between the 2 at GC, the neck profiles were very similar, but the Standard 50’s was slightly beefier. The Traditional has just the slightest flat area along the spine of the neck, while the 50’s felt more round all the way around. I honestly would have never noticed it if I hadn't been scrutinizing their neck profiles and comparing them side by side. They both felt great to me.

The other noticeable difference between them was the binding. The new models from the Original Collection, which includes the Standard 50’s, has much thinner binding, more in line with Historic spec. I have to admit that the Standard 50’s was much more comfortable than the Traditional in this regard; the Trad wasn’t bad, but the 50’s was better.

I like Les Pauls from the 80’s and 90’s, so the things I like the most about the Traditional model line are the 9-hole weight relief, the Nashville bridges, and the larger headstocks. The thing I liked most about the Standard 50’s was the thinner neck binding. Aside from that, they’re pretty much the same model.

TL;DR: The Standard 50’s and 2019 Traditional are very similar guitars, so you may want to try both models.
One thing to point out is that the 2019 Traditionals that is being asked about here (along with the 2018’s and perhaps others) don’t have any weight relief whatsoever nor are they using Nashville bridges.

I agree wholeheartedly on the thinner binding aspect. Just that little bit of extra fret space makes a big difference in terms of high E strings staying on the fretboard.
 

edselman

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Could you tell me why exactly please?
Thanks!
The first issue has nothing to do with functionality. I was disappointed with Gibson’s creation of the Traditional in the first place. They took the Standard down a disturbing path in 2008 and it seemed that Gibson had lost its way. I would just like to have a Standard that has finally come home.

The second and most important issue for me is the choice between a slim or fat neck, the thinner binding and the return to a higher level of quality and workmanship. High quality is now the new normal. My Traditional is my fifth. Each of the others had either glaring quality control issues that I chose to overlook or features that I disliked (Nashville bridge, chrome plating, crappy fretboards, etc).
 

Rob the Photog

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I was disappointed with Gibson’s creation of the Traditional in the first place. They took the Standard down a disturbing path in 2008 and it seemed that Gibson had lost its way.
I completely agree with this. I love my Trad, but it’s a shame that they screwed with the Standard so much in the first place, that they then had to “create” the Traditional.

One thing to point out is that the 2019 Traditionals that is being asked about here (along with the 2018’s and perhaps others) don’t have any weight relief whatsoever nor are they using Nashville bridges.

I agree wholeheartedly on the thinner binding aspect. Just that little bit of extra fret space makes a big difference in terms of high E strings staying on the fretboard.
Yes, you’re right. They went back to ABR-1s in 2017 (although, they aren’t mounted directly to the body, so they’re kind of a hybrid between a true ABR-1 and a Nashville). Not exactly sure which years had 9-hole weight relief and which years were solid.
 

danzego

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I completely agree with this. I love my Trad, but it’s a shame that they screwed with the Standard so much in the first place, that they then had to “create” the Traditional.



Yes, you’re right. They went back to ABR-1s in 2017 (although, they aren’t mounted directly to the body, so they’re kind of a hybrid between a true ABR-1 and a Nashville). Not exactly sure which years had 9-hole weight relief and which years were solid.
It looks like 2013-2015 and 2017-2019 were the non-weight relieved years. :)
 

anorton

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I’m so glad this site exists: everything you need to know about all the Traditionals.

 

SloeGin

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I also noticed on the Thomann and Andertons website the traditional isn't available (currently)?
Has Gibson stopped production already on these?
 
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edselman

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I also noticed on the Thomann and Andertons website the traditional isn't available (currently)?
Has Gibson stopped production already on these?
That would appear to be the case.
 

danzego

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I also noticed on the Thomann and Andertons website the traditional isn't available (currently)?
Has Gibson stopped production already on these?
They stopped production on them months ago. Stock started drying up shortly after Gibson announced the Original and Modern Collections, which officially launched on April 29th.

The Traditional was a replacement for the Standard, which Gibson began using as their test bed for new features. Now that Gibson returned the Standard to more classic specs, there’s no need for the Traditional.
 

pgfitzgerald

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I have a 2019 Traditional. No tuning issues whatsoever. The only thing I don't like about it are the smaller frets.

I've not had the opportunity to see or play the new original 50s style, but they sure look nice.
 

1all's Pub

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Don’t worry about the tuners. While they look like vintage Klusons, they are actually modern tuners and are very good and stable. I’ve had them in many guitars (& even own a couple spare sets).

Tuning issues with Gibson are almost always nut-related (despite their expensive PLEK process Gibson screws up nuts waaay more often than is acceptable, just sayin’).

After the nut it’s bridge saddles that are the next most likely tuning instability culprits. Tuners come in a distant third. :)
 
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danzego

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I have a 2019 Traditional. No tuning issues whatsoever. The only thing I don't like about it are the smaller frets.

I've not had the opportunity to see or play the new original 50s style, but they sure look nice.
They have the same frets.
 

danzego

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Don’t worry about the tuners. While they look like vintage Klusons, they are actually modern tuners and are very good and stable. I’ve had them in many guitars (& even own a couple spare sets).

Tuning issues with Gibson are almost always nut-related (despite their expensive PLEK process Gibson screws up nuts waaay more often than is acceptable, just sayin’).

After the nut it’s bridge saddles that are the next most likely tuning instability culprits. Tuners come in a distant third. :)
I would place poor stringing technique above saddles. Like you stated, the nut is definitely the main culprit. :)
 
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