Gibson Les Paul Standard Heritage 80 Bridges

pmonk

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My Standard Heritage 80 Les Paul came with Nashville Tune-O-Matic Bridge

Does anyone build studs that fit in Heritage 80 bushings that allow drop on replacement for an ABR-1 bridge?
 

mudface

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Yes......Faber makes a direct replacement that will fit the existing Nashville studs..........ABR-N is their model.

They also have replacement studs that you can fit a real Gibson ABR-1.

Here’s my 1977 Custom with the Faber ABR-N in aged gold.

9A40016A-3BE1-41F4-BF23-4DCFF9DFF24A.jpeg
 

pmonk

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ARandall

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The Nashville used on the Heritage is just the same dimension as any other Nashville. So any brand that makes parts that convert one to the other will work. But as said Faber is one of the better ones.

Remember that both the Nashville and ABR have downsides. The bad part about the ABR is the lack of saddle travel, plus the low bending strength of the 3/16 threaded rod studs.
The Nashville downsides are the slop in the threads between the 2 mounting 'bushes', and the shallow inserted depth in the wood.

Thats the worst way to do it structurally. You maintain both of the Nashville's poor coupling aspects whilst adding the reduced travel of the ABR.

The better ways are the 'Plus' or 'Pro' setups....where you replace the whole Nashville hardware with a solid deeper insert into the wood.
 

mudface

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The Nashville used on the Heritage is just the same dimension as any other Nashville. So any brand that makes parts that convert one to the other will work. But as said Faber is one of the better ones.

Remember that both the Nashville and ABR have downsides. The bad part about the ABR is the lack of saddle travel, plus the low bending strength of the 3/16 threaded rod studs.
The Nashville downsides are the slop in the threads between the 2 mounting 'bushes', and the shallow inserted depth in the wood.


Thats the worst way to do it structurally. You maintain both of the Nashville's poor coupling aspects whilst adding the reduced travel of the ABR.

The better ways are the 'Plus' or 'Pro' setups....where you replace the whole Nashville hardware with a solid deeper insert into the wood.
I still have the original Nashville bridge though it has collapsed... the reason for replacing it... the Faber ABR-N fits the original Schaller thumb wheel/studs pretty snug. A good fit.
 

pmonk

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The Nashville used on the Heritage is just the same dimension as any other Nashville. So any brand that makes parts that convert one to the other will work. But as said Faber is one of the better ones.

Remember that both the Nashville and ABR have downsides. The bad part about the ABR is the lack of saddle travel, plus the low bending strength of the 3/16 threaded rod studs.
The Nashville downsides are the slop in the threads between the 2 mounting 'bushes', and the shallow inserted depth in the wood.


Thats the worst way to do it structurally. You maintain both of the Nashville's poor coupling aspects whilst adding the reduced travel of the ABR.

The better ways are the 'Plus' or 'Pro' setups....where you replace the whole Nashville hardware with a solid deeper insert into the wood.
I'm really not into pulling out the bushings and possible drilling a 41 year old guitar.
 

ARandall

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What has the age of the guitar got to do with it?? Its not a golden era Gibson nor will it ever be. You are also modding the guitar away from stock in both cases......so resale will be affected no matter which method you go if you keep the bridge on.
Both methods are also fully reversible to original in a completely invisible manner.
 

pmonk

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What has the age of the guitar got to do with it?? Its not a golden era Gibson nor will it ever be. You are also modding the guitar away from stock in both cases......so resale will be affected no matter which method you go if you keep the bridge on.
Both methods are also fully reversible to original in a completely invisible manner.
Not everything about resale. I never plan on selling this guitar, so not sure why you felt the need to give an opinion I did not ask for?

The guitar plays fine but the saddles are showing 41 years of wear and tear and need to be replaced and was thinking about replacing the whole bridge itself.


You are more than welcome to stop by and do the work for me?
 

ARandall

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You want to fund an international airline ticket for me once flights go ahead, I'm all in. Its a lot for quite literally 30 seconds of work though.

I never plan on selling this guitar, so not sure why you felt the need to give an opinion I did not ask for?
I certainly cannot assume anybody has thought through the process completely. Statistically speaking most here haven't thought all aspects through, so have had to pause to consider what they missed.
I mean I am certainly thorough about examining the validity of my advice and my thought processes here to help people out the most I can....so I can't see why you felt the need to give me an opinion on my reasoning that I didn't ask for.


A Nashville is a fine replacement. If you were wanting to go for 'the whole' as you put it.....why not eliminate a 'bridge weakness' rather than just adding another.
 

pmonk

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I just worked on an 80 elite about a month ago, the inserts/bushings came out very easily, and the holes are already deep so no need to drill
I will give it a shot during the next string change and see if th pop out.
 

dbwalker

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I will give it a shot during the next string change and see if th pop out.
They are real short and should come out fairly easy, one of these i literally lifted it out with my fingernail, the other I threaded the post in to it and just pulled on it gently, the guitar in the pic I put long bushings in it for the guy
 


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