Gibson Flying V in the eye

El_Rey

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It's been a long time since I was arround here so glad to be here again!!

I have treat on the table with a flying V from the '95. Can you give me some info about construction and how much would you pay for it??? From what I remember 90's are not a really good years for LP. Have never had real interest in other dogs than Les Pauls or Strats so I bet you can give me some good advice.
 

Deftone

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It's been a long time since I was arround here so glad to be here again!!

I have treat on the table with a flying V from the '95. Can you give me some info about construction and how much would you pay for it??? From what I remember 90's are not a really good years for LP. Have never had real interest in other dogs than Les Pauls or Strats so I bet you can give me some good advice.
I had a Gibson Flying V from the '90's, it was awesome. I should have kept it.
Flying V.jpg

Your best bet would be to get some comps and check the Price Guide on Reverb, but remember those prices are slightly inflated to cover PP and Reverb Fees as well as low offers.
 

ARandall

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^ Maybe there's an opposite mindless rumour countering the totally fictitious '90's was the good wood era' one.
90's are no different in nature to any other era.....there are good guitars and horrible ones. All 3 of my 90's Gibsons were terrible......and all of my 3 Norlin era guitars are my fave Gibson instruments.

People mindlessly repeat stuff they read without thinking the least about why. Nothing much changed in the construction of the typical Les Paul after about 1984 save for the re-introduction of 2 piece tops and a change of the logo (in about 93) to a sort of vintage 50's type.
The wood might have been more pretty, but none of the selection criteria in wood mills relate to its ability to make a great musical instrument. Indeed the requirement of the mahogany to be weight relieved stayed all the way through this supposed 'good wood' era. So its not like they tried to find light blanks at all.

But instruments are not defined merely by their specs. A heavy Les Paul is almost perfect for a lot of musical styles.....ones that are just as relevant today as they were in the 80's and 90's when the guitars were made. So equally you cannot say objectively that such heavy guitars cannot be good or work well for players.

This is the worst part of the net.......baseless blanket statements - as well as people who blindly believe them and/or pass them on.
 

El_Rey

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^ Maybe there's an opposite mindless rumour countering the totally fictitious '90's was the good wood era' one.
90's are no different in nature to any other era.....there are good guitars and horrible ones. All 3 of my 90's Gibsons were terrible......and all of my 3 Norlin era guitars are my fave Gibson instruments.

People mindlessly repeat stuff they read without thinking the least about why. Nothing much changed in the construction of the typical Les Paul after about 1984 save for the re-introduction of 2 piece tops and a change of the logo (in about 93) to a sort of vintage 50's type.
The wood might have been more pretty, but none of the selection criteria in wood mills relate to its ability to make a great musical instrument. Indeed the requirement of the mahogany to be weight relieved stayed all the way through this supposed 'good wood' era. So its not like they tried to find light blanks at all.

But instruments are not defined merely by their specs. A heavy Les Paul is almost perfect for a lot of musical styles.....ones that are just as relevant today as they were in the 80's and 90's when the guitars were made. So equally you cannot say objectively that such heavy guitars cannot be good or work well for players.

This is the worst part of the net.......baseless blanket statements - as well as people who blindly believe them and/or pass them on.
actually is what I remember I had readen long yers ago. Never intended to say it is true.

Thanks for all the opinions shared as allways the best ppl arround here.
 

01GT Eibach

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Since when are 90s Gibsons no good?
I don't think there are are any bad years. Each major era of Les Pauls seemed to have its particular "features" that results in people who love them and also their detractors. But -- to me at least -- none of the eras were ever built as a sub-par Les Paul with poor materials or workmanship ... when compared to other years. This clearly opens up for the "what about the early '70s pancake bodies, etc.??" I would retort that those guitars are so "bad" that they are magically highly desired now and very expensive to attain, especially the LP Customs.
 

Shelkonnery

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I guess there’s two sides to every story. Every Gibson era has a following, so take these generalizations with a grain of salt.

Without getting into the “good wood era” debate, I’ve read from former employees that ’89-’93 were the years that established the groundwork for what would become the Custom Shop. The first iterations of the Classics were even supposed to be one of the first Historic Reissues. And production numbers were low to try to raise QC.

That makes total sense when you think of new ownership at the time trying to turn things around - much like we’ve seen recently. It’s so funny, people even use the same wording, calling the 2020s a new golden era, which is exactly what was heard in the early 90s. Apparently we can be very influenced by marketing.

You don’t often hear bad stories about 90s Gibsons, quite the opposite actually. I must say an experience like the one posted above is really unusual to hear.

I’ve had Gibsons from all modern decades and my ’90 LPC is really something special (9lbs btw before anyone states they’re all boat anchors). But that doesn’t mean anything, Gibson puts out amazing guitars each and every year, it’s a matter of which era and specs you like best.
 
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My 1971 V, has been with me since September 5th, 1983 .
Never letting it go.
I really wish, the original owner would have never taken off the coin on this guitar

20220625_024624.jpg
 

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