Gene Simmons "No new iconic artist has emerged since 1988."

socialhero

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I don’t think anybody in this thread has mentioned Yanni yet and that fires me up.
  • 16 albums peaked at No. 1 in Billboard's "Top New Age Album" category
  • Two albums received Grammy nominations
  • Performed in more than 30 countries on five continents
  • More than 40 platinum and gold albums globally
  • Sales totaling over 25 million copies
  • A52455E1-5011-4DB4-AA11-B31990DABFBD.gif
 

HearHear

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I was born late ‘60’s and enjoyed Nirvana, Guns n Roses, Beastie Boys and Run DMC. Kiss never did anything for me. I like Taylor Swift as well. In 2017 I paid a zillion dollars for tickets to see Paul McCartney because I like the Beatles too. But to put it all in perspective, I’ll paraphrase some wise words I heard from a ‘60’s icon from right before my time. The old British rock group Peter and Gordon were of the ‘60’s and loved in the ‘60’s. Gordon passed away a few years ago. But Peter Asher (Peter of Peter and Gordon) is still out there. Had a Sirius XM radio show of oldies and actually did a small solo tour a few years ago. He knew Paul McCartney in the Beatle era because his sister dated him. Paul gave him some music to run with back then. But anyway, Peter Asher recently wrote a book on the Beatles since he intimately knew them, and promoting that was part of his tour. He came to a small venue near me about 2 or 3 years ago and I bought tickets to see him. To say he was a living rock history book is an understatement. He taught the small audience to sing his iconic hit “A World Without Love”. But what he said was this- don’t get hung up on the past. There are some great artists in the present (and he named a few young current fantastic artists he admired and knew). Young artists today are just as talented as the icons of the past. And this advice came from a man who got musically coached by the Beatles. Enjoy old music, but explore new music as well. It’s exciting.
 

DotStudio

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Well, I guess I’m an old man, because I see no icons among that list!
I know this thread is even further off path, but I'm back on night shift, and I need to stay awake. So here's a response:

That's the point. You are older, and that's why that list makes you scratch your head. I was being sincere earlier in the thread when I stated "you were probably working." I'm just about to enter my 40's and I'm completely disconnected from the music scene because I'm busy working and raising a family.

But young, dumb, and angsty Dot was blasting Rage Against the Machine in his 88 Camaro for a year straight, and my group of friends collectively lost our minds when Tool (from the same era) dropped Lateralus my freshman year of college. We holed ourselves up for a week in our dorm rooms playing it on repeat.

To my generation, those bands are iconic. Just like the bands from your youth are iconic to your generation. Tool had a number one album in 2019 and Rage will have a sold out arena tour as soon as the pandemic is over. These aren't flash in the pan bands. They're both 30 years in and still huge. I'm only a casual Radiohead fan, but they have one of the most rabid fan bases out there. Again, another 90's band.

Nothing wrong with getting older, but a little perspective goes a long way. That's all I was trying to get at with my earlier posts.
 

BornToLooze

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I know this thread is even further off path, but I'm back on night shift, and I need to stay awake. So here's a response:

That's the point. You are older, and that's why that list makes you scratch your head. I was being sincere earlier in the thread when I stated "you were probably working." I'm just about to enter my 40's and I'm completely disconnected from the music scene because I'm busy working and raising a family.

But young, dumb, and angsty Dot was blasting Rage Against the Machine in his 88 Camaro for a year straight, and my group of friends collectively lost our minds when Tool (from the same era) dropped Lateralus my freshman year of college. We holed ourselves up for a week in our dorm rooms playing it on repeat.

To my generation, those bands are iconic. Just like the bands from your youth are iconic to your generation. Tool had a number one album in 2019 and Rage will have a sold out arena tour as soon as the pandemic is over. These aren't flash in the pan bands. They're both 30 years in and still huge. I'm only a casual Radiohead fan, but they have one of the most rabid fan bases out there. Again, another 90's band.

Nothing wrong with getting older, but a little perspective goes a long way. That's all I was trying to get at with my earlier posts.
I'm not even 30 yet and I'm already hitting that point. The other day I wanted to listen to a "new song" by a band I used to listen to, that apparently came out 3 years before my daughter was born. Is this what getting old feels like? And I used to be the same way, except it was Killswitch Engage and My Chemical Romance.

But one thing that's helped me expand my musical taste, was something that I think Keith Richards said, all the cats that get you hot, go listen to what makes them hot. Welcome to the Black Parade was just MCR trying to mash up Queen and Sgt. Peppers and all these bands they love, or how every metal guitar player was influence by Michael Schenker. If I love the music that was inspired by that band or person, why would I not want to listen to it?

And after a while I went from I like it or I don't like it, to pulling out parts I liked or just being able to tell why it's so popular. And some stuff you can't really appreciate until later on, that's why I went with Korn earlier. George Van Epps had the first production seven string guitar, and people played with the idea for a while after that, Alex Gregory is a cunt, Lenny Breau, had a solid body 7 built for him but it had a high A, instead of the low B, and then Steve Vai had the Universe made, and he used it like jazz guitarists did, and then Korn came along. And to use correct metalhead terms...they did the drop low and the chuggas, and unlike the other 7 string bands from the time Korn used to be on the radio all the time.
 

cjpeck

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I know this thread is even further off path, but I'm back on night shift, and I need to stay awake. So here's a response:

That's the point. You are older, and that's why that list makes you scratch your head. I was being sincere earlier in the thread when I stated "you were probably working." I'm just about to enter my 40's and I'm completely disconnected from the music scene because I'm busy working and raising a family.

But young, dumb, and angsty Dot was blasting Rage Against the Machine in his 88 Camaro for a year straight, and my group of friends collectively lost our minds when Tool (from the same era) dropped Lateralus my freshman year of college. We holed ourselves up for a week in our dorm rooms playing it on repeat.

To my generation, those bands are iconic. Just like the bands from your youth are iconic to your generation. Tool had a number one album in 2019 and Rage will have a sold out arena tour as soon as the pandemic is over. These aren't flash in the pan bands. They're both 30 years in and still huge. I'm only a casual Radiohead fan, but they have one of the most rabid fan bases out there. Again, another 90's band.

Nothing wrong with getting older, but a little perspective goes a long way. That's all I was trying to get at with my earlier posts.
How did you miss Undertow?
 

nauc

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Simmons is an idiot

maybe only a few guys ever, were better than this...

 

wildhawk1

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Gene and Waters will be featured in Grumpy Old Rock Stars coming to a theatre near you.

:slash:
 

Brek

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My initial thought was if talking about guitarists he is right. Struggling to think of anyone who had an impact like EVH, I mean I thought of the guy from Muse, but whilst he plays well with some originality, no one rushed out to buy a guitar after hearing him. Slash was an ‘87 hit so out of range.

but in terms of general artists like the next Prince, no one springs to mind there either, maybe we all so jaded nothing really wows us anymore? Sure there have been plenty of talented enough performers, but ‘iconic ‘? I think he’s right now I think on it.
 

BornToLooze

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My initial thought was if talking about guitarists he is right. Struggling to think of anyone who had an impact like EVH, I mean I thought of the guy from Muse, but whilst he plays well with some originality, no one rushed out to buy a guitar after hearing him. Slash was an ‘87 hit so out of range.

but in terms of general artists like the next Prince, no one springs to mind there either, maybe we all so jaded nothing really wows us anymore? Sure there have been plenty of talented enough performers, but ‘iconic ‘? I think he’s right now I think on it.
That's why I was fanboying over Korn. The closest I can think of someone doing what EVH did was the dude that "replaced" him, and he didn't come close to changing stuff like Eddie did.

But I think you're right about being too jaded. Regardless of your opinion on them, Greta Van Fleet was a breath of fresh air in new music. Are they a Zeppelin rip off? Yes. But if they wouldn't have been shit on constantly, there's a chance they could grow into their own thing. Just like The Black Parade was my generations angsty mix of Sgt Peppers and Bohemian Rhapsody.

The next Viral Sensation Formally Known as A Prince Ripoff could go viral tomorrow, but everyone will rip into him for being a ripoff of Prince. Everybody has forgotten how cool music is, they're just looking for a reason to hate on everything.
 

DotStudio

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My initial thought was if talking about guitarists he is right. Struggling to think of anyone who had an impact like EVH, I mean I thought of the guy from Muse, but whilst he plays well with some originality, no one rushed out to buy a guitar after hearing him. Slash was an ‘87 hit so out of range.

but in terms of general artists like the next Prince, no one springs to mind there either, maybe we all so jaded nothing really wows us anymore? Sure there have been plenty of talented enough performers, but ‘iconic ‘? I think he’s right now I think on it.
Love him or hate him, this guy is definitely regarded as a guitar hero and icon by a portion of the younger generation.

Screenshot_20210421-031537_Google.jpg


He made guitar-driven, stripped down rock/blues cool again when it was pretty much dead on the charts. Hell, he even brought an entire brand of shitty guitars back from extinction. But no, he's no EVH. Most of the wow factor guitarists and innovators can now be found on YouTube and Instagram. It's a different world now.
 

murmel

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That's why I was fanboying over Korn. The closest I can think of someone doing what EVH did was the dude that "replaced" him, and he didn't come close to changing stuff like Eddie did.

But I think you're right about being too jaded. Regardless of your opinion on them, Greta Van Fleet was a breath of fresh air in new music. Are they a Zeppelin rip off? Yes. But if they wouldn't have been shit on constantly, there's a chance they could grow into their own thing. Just like The Black Parade was my generations angsty mix of Sgt Peppers and Bohemian Rhapsody.

The next Viral Sensation Formally Known as A Prince Ripoff could go viral tomorrow, but everyone will rip into him for being a ripoff of Prince. Everybody has forgotten how cool music is, they're just looking for a reason to hate on everything.
I guess the biggest issue is that the overall skill level in the guitar community has increased a lot during the last 50 years, especially at the very top. People like Tosin Abasi are still innovating a lot, but they are so far beyond the average player that what the do cannot adapted as easily as tapping. Also it is very questionable how these innovations could contribute to more popularity in the general public as it takes a lot of understanding even on the listeners side, so it's really more a niche thing. Even Metallicas greatest hits were, far from their most technically challenging.
 

DotStudio

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I guess the biggest issue is that the overall skill level in the guitar community has increased a lot during the last 50 years, especially at the very top. People like Tosin Abasi are still innovating a lot, but they are so far beyond the average player that what the do cannot adapted as easily as tapping. Also it is very questionable how these innovations could contribute to more popularity in the general public as it takes a lot of understanding even on the listeners side, so it's really more a niche thing. Even Metallicas greatest hits were, far from their most technically challenging.
Ha, I was going to reference Tosin in my post above regarding Youtube/Instagram. You're right, it's hard to see how that level of virtuosity could be translated to the masses.
 

BornToLooze

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I guess the biggest issue is that the overall skill level in the guitar community has increased a lot during the last 50 years, especially at the very top. People like Tosin Abasi are still innovating a lot, but they are so far beyond the average player that what the do cannot adapted as easily as tapping. Also it is very questionable how these innovations could contribute to more popularity in the general public as it takes a lot of understanding even on the listeners side, so it's really more a niche thing. Even Metallicas greatest hits were, far from their most technically challenging.
That's what made me kinda reevaluate my guitar playing. I'm a Metallica fanboy, and I've spent ages trying to learn stuff like Blackened and Battery. I got it to the point where I could play Puppets about as fast and as clean as Live Shit, but that's an even more perishable skill than being able to shred. And I could do it, but it was 100% of what I could do, with an interlude, and then more of 100% of what I could do.

And that's one weird way that youtube has helped my guitar playing. Anything you can play, somebody on youtube can do it better, they're always so focused on their playing, but people like Nuno and Roy Clark are just having so much fun playing. That's why I don't knock Kiss. I don't think it's ever taken me more than 5 minutes to learn a Kiss song, but they're so goddamned fun to play.
 

MikeyTheCat

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I don’t think anybody in this thread has mentioned Yanni yet and that fires me up.
  • 16 albums peaked at No. 1 in Billboard's "Top New Age Album" category
  • Two albums received Grammy nominations
  • Performed in more than 30 countries on five continents
  • More than 40 platinum and gold albums globally
  • Sales totaling over 25 million copies
  • View attachment 532741
Imagine if Yanni, John Tesh, and Kenny G formed a power trio!
The musical implications are mind blowing.
 


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