G-1275 pickup magnets different polarity discovered.

trapland

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Hopefully my discovery will save someone some aggravation some day.

I hated the hot muddy tone of the stock pickups in my Epiphone G-1275 double neck SG. I decided to experiment with magnets.

As I discovered by accident and having to test the other neck I wasn't working on, the magnets are not typical polarity.

Most SGs, Les Pauls, and maybe the Gibson EDS-1275 use standard polarity in the pickups. In other words "north" points toward the poles of the pickup and when mounted in the guitar the necks north points to the headstock and the bridges north points to the tailpiece. All very proper. If you reverse ONE magnet you get an out of phase sound with both pickups selected, ala Peter Greene. Cool but not standard.

In the case of the G-1275, the bridge pickup has the magnet reversed so north points toward the slugs and the headstock. Both necks are like this. However this does NOT result in out of phase with both pickups selected. I of course assumed it would be standard and had to disassemble the guitar again. If you install magnets in the conventional manner you will get an OUT OF PHASE situation with both pickups selected on a given neck.

Without looking at the wiring schematic, I am assuming this was done to compensate for the 3rd switch that the G-1275 has that allows each neck to have its own pickup selector. This guitar also lets you select both necks simultaneously. The Gibson doubleneck does not have 3 switches. I suspect adding the 3rd switch and allowing both necks on at once creates an out of phase situation. Somewhere along the line those crazy cats at Epiphone figured out they had to flip a magnet to keep everything working as expected and NOT Peter Greene style. Those klever Koreans.

This might be a helpful tidbit for pickup winders to file away so they don't get blamed for odd middle position sound. The only reason I'm still using an Epi double is the 3 switch thing, I imagine lots of guys will want to upgrade pickups.

Hope this helps someone someday.
 

ARandall

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There is no 'proper' polarity. You can equally have north or south facing the screws, it matters not. As an example, Fender started the 50's with one orientation, and switched halfway through the decade.

Phase obviously requires two pickups to have the wind and magnets the same way. (you could have magnets of opposite polarity but wire them up with the opposite end as hot and it all equals out).

I don't know how your 6/12 is wired, but I would consider that sort of guitar to be unusual if pickups on both necks could be selected at the same time.

Needless to say, unless the whole thing has some kind of phase reversal, you are still selecting 2 pickups together.....and they have to be in phase with each other when combined.
 

LtKojak

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The humbucker convention is the following:

Screw coil = South - Slug coil = North

If you use a compass, as opposites attract, the pointing towards North is in reality South polarity, so the earth's North pole is the magnetic south pole.

HTH,
 

ARandall

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How do you know its not the north needle on a compass having 'south' polarity material on it.

And they are simply names given to 2 different alignments. So the North pole has been called north because that is the name given to to the alignment of the material in that area. Hence it is north.
 

cooljuk

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You got a few things backwards there, OP, but to cure your curiosity...

The reason manufacturers will sometimes install humbucker pairs in a RWRP configuration is generally so when you split the coils into single coil mode, you can use the coil of each pickup that the manufacturer prefers in split mode, while still keeping the two split pickups in phase and hum cancelling in the middle position.

If you take a guitar with a pair of typical PAFs and flip the magnet of one, the pickups will be out of phase when combined. If you then reverse the wiring of either one they will be back in phase when combined and sound just like the original configuration. It's only when you start splitting coils that doing both will make a difference.

The reason you will find single coils with magnets and wiring arranged this way is for hum cancelling when you combine two of them.
 

cooljuk

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At least North is called North for a good reason. Better than "positive" and "negative", relating the the flow of electrons. That was a 50/50 guess at the time. ...and ended up being wrong.
 

trapland

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The humbucker convention is the following:

Screw coil = South - Slug coil = North

If you use a compass, as opposites attract, the pointing towards North is in reality South polarity, so the earth's North pole is the magnetic south pole.

HTH,
Whoops. Of course. I was reading my compass, not the magnet.
 

trapland

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You got a few things backwards there, OP, but to cure your curiosity...

The reason manufacturers will sometimes install humbucker pairs in a RWRP configuration is generally so when you split the coils into single coil mode, you can use the coil of each pickup that the manufacturer prefers in split mode, while still keeping the two split pickups in phase and hum cancelling in the middle position.

If you take a guitar with a pair of typical PAFs and flip the magnet of one, the pickups will be out of phase when combined. If you then reverse the wiring of either one they will be back in phase when combined and sound just like the original configuration. It's only when you start splitting coils that doing both will make a difference.

The reason you will find single coils with magnets and wiring arranged this way is for hum cancelling when you combine two of them.

So I wonder if some or all of these pickups are reversed. When I said proper, what I really meant was "conventional" as related to a standard LP or SG pickup config. I thought I mentioned those.

Thanks for clarifying things. The point was to create a searchable thread to save some other person some time and grief. It would be cool if we could find a wiring schematic with pickup config to link to this thread. Anyone have it for the G-1275?
 

trapland

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I don't think those are the same wiring. The Epiphone has 3 switches, one for EACH neck for pickup selection and one to chose the neck.
 


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