Fret Sprout

sonar

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A couple guitars me and my bandmates keep at the rehearsal spot have developed fret sprout. (its been a rough winter for some of us, same with some of our guitars.)

Anyway, How have you dealt with fret sprout?
 

no1uno

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Yeah, It's been dry here too. My studio also has this "fret sprout'. I'm thinking about picking up a dremel and carefully grind down the sharp bits.
 

RangerJay

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Unless you know what you are doing and have the tools, take it to a good luthier.

Or, you can try this:

1. Clean the fretboard and then oil the crap out of it. Wipe off the excess oil when done.

2. Place a damp cloth in a baggie with some small holes punched in it, and then close that up with the guitar in a case. Obviously, don't let the baggie touch the guitar. Put it somewhere warm, but not overly warm. Check daily.

3. Check the towel regularly and add moisture if necessary. This will allow the wood to soak up some moisture. It may swell enough to get back to "normal," or it may not.

I've done this with a Guild acoustic that got too dry, and it worked well enough. It wasn't a severe case, though. Still had to have some frets filed by a pro later. I figured a pro would have the tools and skill to do it, and the cost was less than what it would have been for me to buy the necessary tools that I probably wouldn't need very often, if ever.
 

joesatch

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go with binding/nibs = no fret sprouts
 

dspelman

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A couple guitars me and my bandmates keep at the rehearsal spot have developed fret sprout. (its been a rough winter for some of us, same with some of our guitars.)

Anyway, How have you dealt with fret sprout?
Superglue your frets. STEWMAC.COM : Issue 43, Super glue your frets for better tone!

That will keep them in the tang cavity (fret sprout is generally defined as when a fret or two lift a bit from the fretboard). I have several guitars that have had their frets glued, and they don't sprout. They also sound better (this is a cork-sniffy reason to do it <G>).

If you're fighting fret ends coming out the edges of the fretboard, the cure is to rehumidify your guitar (the baggie with a moist sponge in it works). Bob Taylor of Taylor guitars has a short series of YouTube videos that explain the process: [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB8tELj43RE]Humidity: The Solution Pt. 1 - YouTube[/ame]

Oiling your fretboard does nothing for it but make it look pretty. It doesn't replace moisture or "vital oils" or any of that. Never let fretboard oil "soak in." You'll eventually find your frets...uh...sprouting.
 

dspelman

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go with binding/nibs = no fret sprouts
Binding/nibs don't prevent frets from sprouting (lifting from the board). Furthermore, a drying fretboard will shrink and allow fret *ends* to push out, cracking the binding (and the nib):

 

sonar

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Filing the fret ends isn't a solution?
 

budg

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Binding/nibs don't prevent frets from sprouting (lifting from the board). Furthermore, a drying fretboard will shrink and allow fret *ends* to push out, cracking the binding (and the nib):

Only 2 of my guitars have nibs. My other 4 dont (2 strats and 2 Martins). I humidify the area I store my guitars to 40-45 percent and have had O fret sprout . And I live in NE Ohio where its been a brutally cold winter here.
 

stringbender11

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This has never happened to any of my guitars, but I've read it many times online. Strange how it happens to some guitars but not others, I guess it's just variances in wood, with price having little do with whether it happens or not?
 

dspelman

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This has never happened to any of my guitars, but I've read it many times online. Strange how it happens to some guitars but not others, I guess it's just variances in wood, with price having little do with whether it happens or not?
You're up in the Pathetic North West, where lack of humidity is never a problem <G>.
 

sonar

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Fortunately the Les Paul and other guitars at the house have been spared.

The problem I'm seeing with a DIY file is pricing out tools on Stewmac. The price difference between tooling up from SM or taking it to a luthier doesn't seem that great.
 

twilliams

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Fortunately the Les Paul and other guitars at the house have been spared.

The problem I'm seeing with a DIY file is pricing out tools on Stewmac. The price difference between tooling up from SM or taking it to a luthier doesn't seem that great.
but once you have the tools and you know how to do it you can do it was many times as you want on as many guitars as you want. Pays for itself quickly if you have a bunch of them.
 

sonar

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but once you have the tools and you know how to do it you can do it was many times as you want on as many guitars as you want. Pays for itself quickly if you have a bunch of them.
I don't really have much desire to work on guitar necks. DIY would be more about not spending money, yet if I buy Stew Mac I'm already close to a professional crown and polish.
 

twilliams

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I don't really have much desire to work on guitar necks. DIY would be more about not spending money, yet if I buy Stew Mac I'm already close to a professional crown and polish.
Cleaning up sharp fret ends and a full crown and polish are quite different. Less than twenty dollars in tools an about an hour of time and you can take care of most sharp fret ends.

I get it that working on guitars is not for everyone but many are so convinced that they can't do it that they never try.

I made the decision a couple of years ago to invest in the proper tools and spent as much time here and with other resources learning how to do things myself. I have several guitars and most of them at some point or another have needed a fret level. I just did one of my Elitists last Friday. Did I do as good a job as a "pro" or a plek machine....probably not. Did I do a good job and does it play 100% better....yes.

Things like fret sprout can be common depending on your environment and it's such as easy thing to fix your self with a little patience.

By no means am I trying to convince anyone to do something they are not comfortable with but most guitar maintenance items are not that difficult.

Just my $.02
 

DrumBob

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I'm going to buy the Stew Mac fret end files that take care of this problem in minutes. Right now, four or five of my guitars have sharp fret ends, and since I don't want to spend the money to take them all to my guitar tech, I'm going to do it myself. From what they say, it's fool proof. The smaller file is almost $50, I think, but the cost of having my tech do all the guitars would be much more.
 

sonar

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Looks like some use a common whetstone. Two-sided stones are medium/fine grit, flat, rigid and long enough to cover multiple frets.
 


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