For those who have made acoustics

ARandall

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One of my winter projects will be my first ever acoustic build.
I'm not going from complete scratch, as I cannot justify the wood bending tools.

So I've bought a Stewmac 'kit' based on the Martin OM. There is still a fair bit of fabrication involved, which will be a good learning experience.

Ok, intro over with.
My question is about the rear, and an addition to the already jointed rosewood.
I want to add the zipper trim (not part of this kit), which is really something you'd glue full depth to the 2 sides if you were doing it normally. In my case with the prejoined back I will have to rout a channel (with fences and an inlay type dremel bit in the router) and install it that way. It will most likely also have to be a degree proud and scraped down.

I am wondering if it is something best done before I do any other work with the back, and
Just how much depth of the rosewood back should I leave
 

the great waldo

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Depending on the thickness of the back 2-2.5 mm I would say inlay the stripe about 1.5 mm deep . You'll have to be a little carefull taking it down to the back level (a very sharp block plane with the throat closed up cabinet scraper or sanding block (a bit long winded) Put some wide masking tape either side of the inlay so that you reduce the chance of cutting into the back surface when paring the inlay down. After youv'e got the inlay level carefully run some thin super glue onto the inlay which will help strenghten the inlay and soak into the end grain of the inlay helping reduce bleeding from laquer at a later stage and reduce laquer sinking into the inlay. The crossbanding will strenghten the joint so get that on as quickly as possible. The correct sanding of the inside of your back is first priority as the outside is going to need finish sanding when the guitar is put together. The depth of the inlay is dependant on the back thickness so you want it deep enough that you don't sand through at some point cockups do happen!! Have fun.
Cheers
Andrew
 

Marty M.

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On my very first 000 acoustic build 40 years ago at the GRD school, we did it this way. The two back sections were glued together with yellow glue. Then a groove was routed down the center and an inlay was glued in with epoxy. That was scraped down to the back. The back at that point was ready for other work....Yes, do it first. Mine was a rosewood strip with wbw purfling on each side. The purfling was then mitered to match up with the purfling on the edge binding. A reinforcing back strip was added later to the inside surface after the shape was cut out and was ready for back brace notches. By using epoxy you could do a nice tight fit and not worry about swelling and trying to get it in the groove with water based glue.


I built about 13 acoustic guitars so far. I just used a sanding dish on my last one instead of a sanding block. I'd recommend it as it really is an improvement. I have not done radiused tops, just flat tops, but the bridge pulls the top into a dome anyway if your braces and top are flexible.


My first looked a lot like this when I was done. My guitar was Paduak.





Slanted binding and purfling joint - Classical Guitar (classicalguitardelcamp.com)

purfling.jpg
 
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Freddy G

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I do the same channel in the back centre seam. Yes do it after the inside of the back is prepped clean but before anything else is done.
 

ARandall

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Thanks everyone for the input.
@Marty M. That's a wonderful looking guitar there. Detail without being too fancy or becoming overly ornate.
 

jkes01

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I have one of these kits sitting in the garage and was thinking of doing the same with mine. Also tossing around the idea of making a laminated neck for it and a few other changes.
 

ARandall

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Do you have a volatile climate? The rod is pretty beefy, and you can always simply not remove any meat from the rough shaping.
Thats my plan for the neck shaping. Plus I have some taller frets to stick on mine....the two aspect of my current acoustic I don't care for.
 

jkes01

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More for the fact I want my headstock and a Gibson style volute. I have some curly mahogany and maybe some rosewood strips and maple veneer. Already have some bigger EVO wire for it as well as ebony Waverly pins and tuners. I am going to make a template of the ebony board that came with it just in case I decide to make a board.

Only thing now is assembly :cool:
 
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