Five figures for a guitar...

CivoLee

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...is insane

We're not even talking vintage models here (which is also insane, because at end of the day it's just an old guitar and any "relicing" in reality is the finish falling apart), but guitars for 10 grand and up just because they're some kind of "limited edition"

Anyone who would pay that kind of money for an instrument had better have a charity in their name
 

LP1865

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Perspective.

Having any guitar at all would be considered a lofty luxury by much of the world's population.

A $140 for a used low end Epiphone could feed, shelter and educate a pre-teen child in Burma for a full year.
Word, my two guitars add up to $180 stock, not counting upgrades
 

Michael Matyas

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It's insane what people are paying for guitars just because they are "old." When I see the bidding on 1970's era Ibanez bolt-on LP knockoffs with ceramic magnet Super 70 pickups getting up into the $1000-$1200 range, I have to laugh. These guitars have pancake bodies and plywood veneer tops with substantial air gaps between the body and the top. I had one of these guitars back in the late 70s and it fed back like crazy through a Peavey 60-watt combo. The finish on that guitar looked about as thick as a window pane.

It's their money and they can spend it any way they choose. For my money, though, I'd rather have a pair of new Epiphones with mahogany set necks and Alnico II Probuckers, or Agile ALS3200MCCs, with 5-piece thru-necks, genuine pearl inlays and real ebony fingerboards. And don't even get me started about what 1960's Gibson Melody Makers are going for on Reverb and ebay. My first electric guitar was a 60s Melody Maker, and it was a total piece of garbage, a waste of good mahogany and rosewood. There was no way to tune it, with those shitty Kluson keys and the stopbar bridge/tailpiece. But the worst thing about that guitar was the pickups. Weak, thin, even through a pretty good Danelectro tube amp, and you could barely hear the high E string at all.

I'd better sign off now or I'm gonna lose my breakfast.
 

CivoLee

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It's insane what people are paying for guitars just because they are "old." When I see the bidding on 1970's era Ibanez bolt-on LP knockoffs with ceramic magnet Super 70 pickups getting up into the $1000-$1200 range, I have to laugh. These guitars have pancake bodies and plywood veneer tops with substantial air gaps between the body and the top. I had one of these guitars back in the late 70s and it fed back like crazy through a Peavey 60-watt combo. The finish on that guitar looked about as thick as a window pane.

It's their money and they can spend it any way they choose. For my money, though, I'd rather have a pair of new Epiphones with mahogany set necks and Alnico II Probuckers, or Agile ALS3200MCCs, with 5-piece thru-necks, genuine pearl inlays and real ebony fingerboards. And don't even get me started about what 1960's Gibson Melody Makers are going for on Reverb and ebay. My first electric guitar was a 60s Melody Maker, and it was a total piece of garbage, a waste of good mahogany and rosewood. There was no way to tune it, with those shitty Kluson keys and the stopbar bridge/tailpiece. But the worst thing about that guitar was the pickups. Weak, thin, even through a pretty good Danelectro tube amp, and you could barely hear the high E string at all.

I'd better sign off now or I'm gonna lose my breakfast.
I get that people can spend their own money however they want, it just upsets me that they would choose to spend it on something that can only be of use to one person (or a series of owners over several years), meanwhile there are people starving in the first world

The only reason dealers can charge those kinds of prices is that there are people who will pay them

We should all start offering no more than the current MSRP of a new Standard on 1959 bursts, and when the dealers say "but it's a rare collector's item, they don't make them like this anymore", we can hit them back with "it's only rare because they didn't sell very many of them when they were new and Gibson wouldn't have started making them again if not for Clapton et al, and they don't make them like that anymore is because they've found better ways to make them"

You know, the awful truth
 

Michael Matyas

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Speaking of Clapton, Page, Bloomfield, etc. and their '59 bursts, how can any of us be so sure that these were such great guitars? They were certainly great musicians, and they were playing some of the best instruments available at the time. How many of us have actually had a 1959 burst in our hands? How can we be so sure that there is some kind of "magic" in these rare birds? How much of that hallowed sound is due to the amplification of the late 60s and early 70s? We can't go back and see for ourselves, and most of us can't afford to spend the equivalent of a McMansion just to find out. I have read a number of books on Gibson Les Pauls, and have read more than once that a number of the 1958-60 Les Paul Standards are disappointing when played.

CivoLee, I am right with you on this subject. Modern, reasonably priced guitars are just fine with me. More options are available than ever before in terms of tonewoods, hardware and electronics. (I'll bet Jimi would have loved to have a double-locking Floyd Rose on his guitar!). And, though I have a few pawnshop guitars, I prefer nice, shiny new stuff without somebody else's sweat and dirt all over it.
 

cooljuk

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I've worked in shops and studios that allowed me the (blessed? cursed?) opportunity to have a constant rotation of vintage instruments and music gear of all sorts coming through. It's generally quality stuff, made with more care, better materials, and sometimes tighter tolerances (other times not), than today.

Of course, vintage gear needs service, after a half-century of use. If it's not maintained, it won't sound or feel its best.
 

redcoats1976

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none of my guitars cost more than $750 when new,most were more like 500 bucks.i cant justify spending more than a car costs on a strictly hobby item.
 

motowntom

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1966 mint Epiphone casino, awesome guitar, sold it to fund my sons first real sports car. 1968 strat, awesome guitar, sold it to fund a whole new computer recording set-up. Had a friend over recently to look at my set-up, a non-musician, presumed I had tens of thousands in equipment, wrong, the whole set-up would not get you a great les paul + a great acoustic, my friend loves my music just the same..... To each his own. I make pro sounding albums with the following.... Squire strat modded, fret level, awesome guit. approx. value $300.00, Agile AD2500, modded, fret level, lindy fralin bridge PU, $350.00, Agile Harm 12 string (I splurged) $450.00, Epiphone Dot Deluxe fret level, new nut, $300.00, 1974 Epiphone FT145 Acoustic, awesome Guit. $150.00, Fender Newporter Acoustic, wonderful sounding and playing guit. $200.00? Chinese alembic knock off bass, lots of fret work, new pots, AWESOME sounding bass, $325.00, Yamaha DGX-202 keyboard/piano, $200.00? I defy anyone to listen to my stuff and ascertain it was recorded with "cheep" guitars/equipment......... Tools or Treasures.... to each his own.
Cheers
 
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Mr Insane

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If I become super rich, I will buy that super expensive SG covered in fugly diamonds



And don't think I'm going to do anything sensible like put in a display case. I'm going to use it as a cutting board or something.


I tune out whenever I hear someone complain about the spending habits of people wealthier than them.
 

moreles

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I tune out whenever I hear someone complain about the spending habits of people wealthier than them.
Ditto. I think of wasteful, indulgent spending as the piberation of money back into the hands of other people. If some "collector" (professional materialist; ick) drops a wad on something, I'm glad for the seller and perfectly OK with the buyer blowing their money and sending it out of their own bank account. I'd much rather have $10,000 than a "$10,000" guitar!
 

mudface

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My corvette........

47BB593B-8757-4499-858E-C81476E1D8EC.jpeg


......Cost less than any two of these guitars.....

81D65F94-F184-4765-B0B4-70D3B98AE245.jpeg


...... yup.... I’m no Rockefeller,.. just a poorassafeller..... but the heart wants what it wants.... and a good job helps and a bit of luck.

I wouldn’t knock what people want to spend or guilt whip them into thinking they should feed starving folks.....

I’m a civil servant and do what I can for those in need..... but I’m not selling my house to do it.
 

Phylodog

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I generally don't care what other people spend their money on provided it's actually their money. It's none of my business if someone pays more than I make in a decade for a guitar, doesn't affect me in the least.

That said, I enjoy knowing that others must feel at least the same amount of passion that I do to pay that kind of money. Outside of family and a very few close friends, playing guitar is the most important thing in my life.
 


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