Fender neck makes cracking sound when pressure is applied?

Davey Rock

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The first one and the last one have plenty of depth in the neck pocket if the heel is any indication.
The next two... no telling how they were done. The one with the wooden plugs may still be bolted together, with the heads recessed and plugged. Furniture builders do it all the time.
The one that is painted, likewise, no way of knowing how that is actually attached since it's painted.
The one that is raw, I can't tell how that is done, but it may actually be a one-piece.


Just saying that YOUR Fender style guitar will be an unsuccessful glue-in conversion as it is today.
Oh HEAVENS NO I’d never do it to my tele. I’m just saying if need be, it isn’t exactly impossible for a bolt neck to be modified enough to work as a set neck. But practical? Not usually. Especially if all you do is plug the holes and glue it. Not to mention should the neck require a shim or is set specifically in set up with the micro tilt.
 

Davey Rock

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The first one and the last one have plenty of depth in the neck pocket if the heel is any indication.
The next two... no telling how they were done. The one with the wooden plugs may still be bolted together, with the heads recessed and plugged. Furniture builders do it all the time.
The one that is painted, likewise, no way of knowing how that is actually attached since it's painted.
The one that is raw, I can't tell how that is done, but it may actually be a one-piece.


Just saying that YOUR Fender style guitar will be an unsuccessful glue-in conversion as it is today.
And oh I also forgot to say that the les Paul had a heel added. Where the heel cut is, that’s what’s it is actually set in the guitar. The extra heel is added for comfortability and extra slight support.
 

dro

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Where?
70s Fender Teles were 3-bolt.
There are some imported Fender models that have a set-neck... it's almost a neck-through design.
Neck-through designs started becoming very popular in the late 70s, and it seemed like a lot of designs were based on the Tele. Carvin had both single and double cut bodies.

There is nowhere NEAR enough contact area between the neck and body on a Fender style neck pocket for glue to survive string tension for very long.
You've got maybe 6 square inches on the bottom in tension, which is a crap joint, you have another maybe 1 square inch in compression, and maybe another 2 on the top side in shear, which is your strongest joint, but not enough of it.
You have virtually nothing on the cutaway side.

Even the short-tenon Les Paul is still DEEP... plenty of material on the sides to hold the neck in shear.

Here's a comparison... not a Les Paul, just a cheap kit, but it's still a valid comparison for the glued area on a set neck.

Now add in the finish.... Glued joints need to be tight, and they need to be wood to wood.
Your neck and body have a finish on them. That is going to need to be removed... and then the neck will have a sloppy fit.
You effectively have a 3" long lap joint, and will be putting 100 pounds of string tension on the pivot point.

Snaaaap!


View attachment 561855
Nothing wrong with the 3 bolt neck. I've bee a G&L player since inception.
The Leo era guitar, with 3 bolt necks are far superior instruments than the BBE models of today.
Much more adjustability. Just keep the bolts tight.
 

Davey Rock

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Nothing wrong with the 3 bolt neck. I've bee a G&L player since inception.
The Leo era guitar, with 3 bolt necks are far superior instruments than the BBE models of today.
Much more adjustability. Just keep the bolts tight.
I love 3 bolt necks. My favorite and they look better.
 

rogue3

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I have a theory,its all in my head of course!:lol:. with no proof except what's between my ears,haha!
A well fitting Telecaster neck(emphasis on flush wood to wood contact>done by an artisan skilled in wood carving, no glue, and correctly tightened bolts) transfers frequencies better than most(but not all) set neck Les Paul's because there is no glue in the joint to present a barrier and filter the frequencies that might otherwise pass through.No glue roadblock.

Take that to the bank(tonque firmly in cheek).:laugh2:
I have seen the light!

absolutely of no relation,but a cool tune.3 o'clock roadblock.
 
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Davey Rock

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I have a theory,its all in my head of course!:lol:. with no proof except what's between my ears,haha!
A well fitting Telecaster neck(emphasis on flush wood to wood contact>done by an artisan skilled in wood carving, no glue, and correctly tightened bolts) transfers frequencies better than most(but not all) set neck Les Paul's because there is no glue in the joint to present a barrier and filter the frequencies that might otherwise pass through.No glue roadblock.

Take that to the bank(tonque firmly in cheek).:laugh2:
I have seen the light!

absolutely of no relation,but a cool tune.3 o'clock roadblock.
Yep makes since
 

CB91710

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Nothing wrong with the 3 bolt neck. I've bee a G&L player since inception.
The Leo era guitar, with 3 bolt necks are far superior instruments than the BBE models of today.
Much more adjustability. Just keep the bolts tight.
Yep... I've got an S500 and Climax H-S-S from the mid 90s.
Both are 3-bolt,
 

bum

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@CB91710 and the guys at the luthier section helped me figure out my 3 bolt neck and it's been very stable with zero issues - I am a fan!

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