Ever see a wrap like this before?

questionman

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endial

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Look how low the bridge is. Probably wanted a better break angle than what even the slammed stoptail could offer.
 

questionman

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Is it just my eyes or does that bridge look thinner?

All the ABR type bridges I have/have seen have a lot more metal between the top and the bottom, that one looks like 1/3 of it isnt there
 

CB91710

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Supposedly a '52, so it originally would have been under-wrapped on a trapeze.
The conversion didn't include adjustment of the neck angle, requiring the "custom" ground-down bridge, thus requiring the under-wrap to maintain break angle as endial said.

This is a perfect example of "Do it right or don't do it at all"
Adjustments and hacks to make something "work" result in further adjustments and hacks being needed down the road.... so now we have a guitar that could have been worth more than a house being offered at the price of a used Corolla and probably won't sell for more than a Yugo.
 

grumphh

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Learn your Gibson history.

This apparantly is one of the very early LP's.


The very first batches of LP's ('1952) were actually close to unplayable because Gibson got the neck angle wrong (horribly wrong actually, especially considering that they had been a guitar manufacturer for many decades at that point :D ) resulting in having the strings laying unpleasantly low over the body if you wanted decent action height.

First solution was to wrap the strings UNDER the trapeze tailpiece/bridge, and only after a while they corrected the neck angle so that you could run the strings OVER whatever bridge you might fancy.

Buying this you'll get one of the very first LP's to ever see the light of the sun....
With a crapload of modifications and the only thing original on it being the wood.
And the neck angle. :rofl:
 

mdubya

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It has the original neck set, which I would prefer over someone drilling and steaming out the original joint.

The ABR-1 is shaved to accommodate the shallow '52 neck angle.

Too bad about the humbuckers and the neck shave, though.
 

fleahead

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Is it me, or is that TOM parallel to the pickup ring, instead of at the usual angle?
 

efstop

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Is it me, or is that TOM parallel to the pickup ring, instead of at the usual angle?
As long as there's enough travel for the saddles, it's fine. Lightning bridges are parallel to the pickups, but they are movable fore and aft. Angling the bridge increases the available travel for saddles.
 

JMP

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I’m no expert, but that poor guitar got hacked! I’d rather by a brand new Standard than that thing. Just because it’s old/vintage, doesn’t mean it’s superior in any way.
 

fleahead

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As long as there's enough travel for the saddles, it's fine. Lightning bridges are parallel to the pickups, but they are movable fore and aft. Angling the bridge increases the available travel for saddles.
I realise that. What I mean is, why not put the TOM on the correct angle that a TOM is usually at? Not that it really matters on this hog.
 

efstop

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I realise that. What I mean is, why not put the TOM on the correct angle that a TOM is usually at? Not that it really matters on this hog.
That is the mystery, eh? A trapeze just sat on the guitar top, so my idea of the restoration artiste using the old holes doesn't work LOL. I've been reading about trapeze bridges. What a piece of shit they were.
A Nashville bridge would have extra saddle travel, but it might not work with the under wrap from the tailpiece.

Aside from the uncovered pup and the narrow bridge, I'd fix those issues and play it, but I wouldn't pay $20,000 Cad + shipping for the privilege.

Also, I would have avoided a TOM & tailpiece and used a vintage wraptail (shaved, no doubt) on studs. Or a trapeze tailpiece and a cut down Gretsch aluminum bridge.
 

Les Paul Newb

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Learn your Gibson history.

This apparantly is one of the very early LP's.


The very first batches of LP's ('1952) were actually close to unplayable because Gibson got the neck angle wrong (horribly wrong actually, especially considering that they had been a guitar manufacturer for many decades at that point :D ) resulting in having the strings laying unpleasantly low over the body if you wanted decent action height.

First solution was to wrap the strings UNDER the trapeze tailpiece/bridge, and only after a while they corrected the neck angle so that you could run the strings OVER whatever bridge you might fancy.

Buying this you'll get one of the very first LP's to ever see the light of the sun....
With a crapload of modifications and the only thing original on it being the wood.
And the neck angle. :rofl:
No palm muting allowed!!!
 

joesatch

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the angle is too sharp the strings are hitting the baseplate on the tuneomatic.
 


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