EH Hum Debugger?

kfowler8

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Anyone every use one of these? Opinions seem to be all over the place. Lots of comments that it impacts your tone when used with OD. I'm thinking about getting one but unsure. Seems like the early ones may have had issues with tone. Looking for some real world feedback.
 

Batman

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I had one for awhile.

It really does a great job of removing 60-cycle noise!

It imparts a "metallic" quality on some rigs that once you hear, you can't un-hear. One of my mates had one and it sounded superb so I bought one for my rig. His didn't have that sound but mine did.

I bought it used and moved it along for the same price. If you buy used you should be able to move it again if it doesn't work out with your rig.
 

cybermgk

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Run them, as my house current is too noisy otherwise.

Yes, does alter tone a tiny bit. Nothing that very slight adjustments to EQ didn't fix. Also, running a buffer first, into the hum Debug works just perfect for me. and minimized that even more.

Never had the metallic thing mentioned above.
 

kfowler8

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Thanks guys. That seems to be what I've read. Effects one rig but not another. I'm going to try to pinpoint where I'm getting the interference from this weekend. If that doesn't work I'll probably give it a shot. There's something that's causing it to go crazy.
 

Batman

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Yeah, the metallic sound tends to be very rig dependent.

I also did not try a buffer first so that may have been my downfall.

Regardless, it does a great job with removing 60-cycle noise.
 

cybermgk

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Yeah, the metallic sound tends to be very rig dependent.

I also did not try a buffer first so that may have been my downfall.

Regardless, it does a great job with removing 60-cycle noise.
Yep almost magic how it removes that hum.

I will also add, if it is REALLY noisy current/environment, particularly with single coils, or even stronger ones like P90s, you can get some weird artifacts with guitar plugged in and amp on, but no playing. Tiny little ramdom gurgle noises. Properly shielding the guitar, cavity, pup cavity, switch cavity, really helps (since I can't fix the home current without major expense). and makes that go away.
 

spitfire

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I agree with others, it works really well knocking out a lot of the hum. But it does affect tone. How much that matters is going to depend on exactly how you run your rig.

In the end, these things are notch filters centered on 60 Hz and the harmonics of 60 Hz. They are very narrow band, but 60 Hz, and the harmonics, are very much in the audible frequency range. So it's going to have an effect on any signal at or near the frequency of the hum.
 

eigentone

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When it comes to noise, the best approach is to just not let it in.

Try determining where the noise is coming from - or what is introducing that noise.

Try electrical isolation using a (good) transformer.

Try shielding.

Make sure you have quality, shielded cabling.

Try it with and without your stomps.

Make sure your stomps have clean power.

Remove things from your signal path which you don't use - eg that stompbox you never use, or guitar controls you don't touch.

Consider modern solutions. If you still cannot handle the noise from pickups, consider modern hum-cancelling designs.

Once you have evaluated and addressed sources of noise, consider noise reduction (eg Hum Debugger). Noise reduction is usually not necessary, and realtime solutions do pretty nasty things to your signal.
 

moreles

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Great comment from eigentone. I would run a debugger only if stuck in a situation where I couldn't do anything about a noise source (that is, an unfavorable performance situation). Otherwise, all the other steps mentioned are worth doing, period, for a clean signal path. Removing hum when it's already in your signal path necessarily means changing tone, and recovering it somewhat, further downstream is not the same.
 

eddie_bowers

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I have made pedal purchases I regretted before, but this is the top of my list. It sounds horrible. Every note sounds like your kicking a tin shed.
 

Dolebludger

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One thing I would consider is to try some things to determine the source of the hum. First, I'd try my amp and guitar in a location other than my house, I'd try other guitars with the amp in my house, and other amps in my house with the same guitar. If these experiments show it is your house current that is causing the problem, I'd consult a good electrician about the house wiring. But you may find that the problem is with your guitar or amp, or both.
 


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