Eastern or western maple on my 2009 5Oth anniversary Gold certificate

megemege

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Hello there,
This is my 3rd post on this forum that I'm reading for years !

I've got this 2009 R9 for a week. SN 9 9008 I guess #8 of the 500 dark bursts.

I can't decide myself if it is an eastern maple top with no flecks at all or
a 3D western top ? unusal on a R9 ?

The figured maple is realy 3D in person and moves under the light.

Please enlight me.

Question 2 :

What about the wawy checking filling the grain ? Will it get realy worst ?
Was it a cold temperature or a Gilbon nitro flaw ? Maybe it normal, it looks cool BTW.

This is a great sounding R9 now with a set of OX4 hot duane (with cover) and TVT CTS pots.

Thanks.

David from France

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R'nien

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You might get a idea of what it is if you open the control cavity and see the color of the natural wood. If it's on the lighter side it's probably eastern, but if it's on the tan side it's probably western.
 

delawaregold

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Please remember there are more than one species of Eastern Maple.
Acer saccharin...................Rock Hard (Sugar) Maple
Acer nigrum ......................Black Maple
Acer rubrum ......................Red Maple
Acer saccharinum...............Silver Maple
Acer pensylvanicum............Striped Maple
These are all species of Eastern Maple.

ALSO:

Please remember there are more than one species of Western Maple.
Acer macrophyllum..............Big Leaf Maple
Acer grandidentatum...........Canyon Maple
Acer glabrum.......................Rocky Mountain Maple
Acer criminate.....................Vine Maple
These are all species of Western Maple.

So is your question "Is this Eastern or Western Maple"
or
Is this Eastern Rock Hard (Sugar) Maple (Hard Maple)
or
Is this Western Big Leaf Maple (Soft Maple)

I don't believe your guitar is Western Maple, but I am not sure which species
of Eastern Maple it is.

Here is a good resource for you.
LINK:
https://www.commercialforestproducts.com/quartersawn-maple/

~DG
 

megemege

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Natural color of the maple : amber ... tan side ?


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delawaregold

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I would call it Quarter Sawn Ribbon Flamed Eastern Maple.
 
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jktxs

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Unless the figure is really obvious like quilt, super deep fat flame or birdseye, it's almost impossible to identify the species of maple.
Quartersawn, tight flame, clean sapwood tops like this really could be anything.

You can ask Gibson directly too; they'll tell you if it's eastern or western.
 

Gold Tone

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Didn’t you get your answer at the LPF?
 

ARandall

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South by southwest for me.....

Can you let us all know why awareness of the precise species is important - given that its not going to change anything relevant to the guitar as an instrument, or you playing it.
 

Gold Tone

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He’s probably just curious to learn. That’s a wonderful thing, people asking questions and increasing their knowledge!
 

DharmaBum

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Cool top. I dig the color and the checking. I can't say what species of maple it is, but I'll try to add to the conversation from the perspective of one who lives in the Pacific Northwest (USA) and works in the forestry industry.

In general, Pacific NW forests are much less diverse than eastern US forests when it comes to hardwoods. There are only a handful of maple species: bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), Douglas maple (Acer glabrum), and vine maple (Acer circinatum). Both Douglas maple and vine maple are smaller, understory trees and not marketed commercially. Most vine maples, for example, are only a few inches in diameter, with very curvy, branched trucks. More of a large shrub than a tree.

Bigleaf maples, however, are large, beautiful trees, and are marketed commercially. The record specimen is about 12 feet in diameter, but trees 5 feet in diameter are not uncommon. The wood is used for both furniture and musical instruments. The trunks are buttressed and the compression wood in the buttress and lower bole can have beautiful figuring.

If the top in question is a western maples species, it is highly likely to be Bigleaf maple. May you play it in good health. Enjoy!
 


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