Duane Allman's 1957 "Layla" Gibson Les Paul sells for $1.25 million

CRobbins

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2012
Messages
9,529
Reaction score
15,682
The Goldtop 1957 Gibson Les Paul guitar which Duane Allman used to record "Layla" alongside Eric Clapton, has sold for $1.25 million at auction, becoming only the seventh guitar in history to sell for more than $1,000,000.


 

Attachments

CRobbins

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2012
Messages
9,529
Reaction score
15,682

ot #1:Duane Allman's Owned and Extensively Played 1957 Goldtop Gibson “Layla” Les Paul Guitar
RETURN TO CATALOG

This lot is closed for bidding. Bidding ended on 7/26/2019
Gotta Have Rock and Roll is proud to have at auction for the very first time, one of the most important guitars in the History of Rock and Roll. Duane Allman's 1957 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop “Layla” guitar. This was Duane’s main guitar during the first two years of the Allman Brothers Band. Duane actually acquired this guitar from one of the band members from the Hour Glass band back in 1968. Gregg and Duane Allman were a part of this blues band out in Alabama. The band member had the 57 Goldtop but never played it. Duane, who loved the guitar, asked to borrow it and then never gave it back. When the band member got upset Duane offered him a keyboard in exchange for the guitar, to which he reluctantly accepted. Duane references the Goldtop in a letter he wrote to Holly Barr back in 1969 saying “I got a Les Paul of my very own”. The letter is featured in Galadrielle Allman’s book, “Please Be With Me: A Song For My Father, Duane Allman”, stating how Duane is almost certainly referring to his Goldtop in this letter.

The Goldtop was used by Duane on the Allman Brothers debut album released in ‘69, as well as “Idlewild South” released in 1970. The albums featured the original versions of “Whipping Post,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” “Midnight Rider,” “Revival” and other classics. The guitar can clearly be seen in the “Loan Me A Dime” studio sessions. It was also used on the Historic “Layla” sessions with Eric Clapton on August 1970. The guitar was known as “The Studio Guitar” as Duane used this guitar the most in the studio. Duane was one of the greatest guitar players in history ranking number 9 by Rolling Stone Magazine. This guitar would be the holy grail in any collection or museum.

The guitar has been on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House in Macon, Georgia. The guitar also still has been getting played, with recent players such as Billy Gibbons, Kirk Hamlet, Charlie Starr, Vince Gill, Derek Trucks and many more. The Rolling Stones were supposed to play it on July 27th if it wasn’t for this auction.

The story is just a few weeks after the “Layla” sessions, Duane traded the guitar for a cherry sunburst. On September 16, 1970, the Allmans played a show in Duane and Gregg Allman’s hometown of Daytona, Florida. Duane, fresh off recording “Layla” was, as usual, playing his ’57 Goldtop. The opening band was a local group called the Stone Balloon, whose guitarist, Rick Stine, was playing a 1959 cherry sunburst Les Paul, which Duane was fond of. While making “Layla” he had fallen in love with Clapton’s cherry sunburst. Wanting one of his own, Duane offered to swap Les Pauls with Rick. When Rick hesitated, Allman upped the stakes, throwing in $200 and one of his regular Marshall 50 heads. Rick agreed and the deal was finalized. After switching hands three times after, the guitar was then purchased by its owner in 1977. The guitar has been refinished twice. The first time the owner was dissatisfied with the results so he went to Tom Murphy, the most renowned “Goldtop guy” in the world. The guitar was then refinished to all its glory. One of the most beautiful parts of the guitar is you can truly hear it, and how it was meant to be heard.

The guitar has been photo matched to every single inlay. The guitar is even matched to the exact serial number, #7 3312. This is one of the most well documented guitars in history. The guitar comes with various photos of Duane Allman playing the guitar, the original transcript stating the history which is signed by all of its original owners and a Gotta Have Rock & Roll™ Certificate of Authenticity. Please note: due to the minimum bid amount for this lot, all bidders must receive approval from Gotta Have Rock and Roll/GottaHaveRockandRoll.com by contacting us at 212-750-7900 and speaking with a company representative prior to the scheduled end of the auction which is 9:00pm (East Coast, U.S. time).
Duane Allmans Owned and Extensively Played 1957 Goldtop Gibson “Layla” Les Paul Guitar


Hover to zoom


Bidding
Current Bidding
Minimum Bid:$1,000,000
Final Bid:$1,000,000
Estimate:$1,500,000 - $3,000,000
Number of Bids:1
 

Mini Forklift Ⓥ

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2018
Messages
381
Reaction score
612
Guessing it's probably not JB, didn't he just recently purchase a one-owner 59? That would probably have cost him half of what this one went for.

Had to laugh at the typo in the article the OP posted :doh:

"The guitar has been on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House in Macon, Georgia, and has also been played by Billy Gibbons, Kirk Hamlet ..."
 

defcrew

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
8,770
Reaction score
12,229
I'm not sure which guitar of Duane's it was but one of them wound up having the head stock chewed up by a puppy. I've always had a nightmarish vision of coming home an dmy favorite geet chewed down to the truss rod and my puppy wagging his tail glad to see me. Just today there was a gnawed up drum stick in my studio. I've heard recordings of Vince Gill playing this guitar in Macon. He did it proud. I've seen it at the Big House. I wonder whether the new owner wll allow it to stay there? They keep mentioning a cherry sunburst. Always thought D played a tobacco?
 

CRobbins

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2012
Messages
9,529
Reaction score
15,682
I'm not sure which guitar of Duane's it was but one of them wound up having the head stock chewed up by a puppy. I've always had a nightmarish vision of coming home an dmy favorite geet chewed down to the truss rod and my puppy wagging his tail glad to see me. Just today there was a gnawed up drum stick in my studio. I've heard recordings of Vince Gill playing this guitar in Macon. He did it proud. I've seen it at the Big House. I wonder whether the new owner wll allow it to stay there? They keep mentioning a cherry sunburst. Always thought D played a tobacco?
 

defcrew

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
8,770
Reaction score
12,229
Yeah, I've seen that pic before CR but I don't recall many where I've seen him playing it. By Fillmore he was playing the one on the right...a much more handsome piece IMO.
 

CRobbins

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2012
Messages
9,529
Reaction score
15,682

The guitar was used on The Allman Brothers debut album released in ‘69, as well as “Idlewild South” released in 1970. It was also used during the Layla sessions with Eric Clapton in August 1970, weeks before he traded the guitar for a 1959 Cherry Burst Les Paul.

In September 1970, the Allman Brothers played a gig in Daytona Beach, with support band the Stone Balloon. The guitarist of that band, Rick Stine, played a plain top 1959 cherry burst Les Paul, which Allman wanted.

Duane Allman playing the 1959 cherry burst Les Paul live At Filmore East, 1971. Photo by Ed Berman
He made a deal with Rick and gave him his ’57 Goldtop, $200 in cash, and a 50-watt Marshall head for the ’59 cherry burst, keeping only the PAF pickups from the Goldtop. He played the cherry burst Les Paul during the Live “At Filmore East”record.

These days the Goldtop is often lent to Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, and other players for live shows. When not in use, it stays at the Big House Museum in Macon, Georgia.

During the last months of his life, Allman was mostly seen playing a 1950s Gibson Les Paul Standard Tobacco Burst “Hot Lanta.” He got the guitar in ‘71 from Kurt Linhof – a guitar dealer and collector who he met through Billy Gibbons of ZZ-Top.
 

defcrew

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
8,770
Reaction score
12,229
I stand corrected. Hurrah for black and white photography!:laugh2:
 




Top