Doubling Vocals?

kfowler8

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For rocks songs, I always double the vocal parts on the choruses. So singing the same thing but two different takes to make it sound thicker.

However I don't do it with verses. Should I? I've always though it might make things muddy but maybe that's not the case. Do you ever do it?
 

Kingdom of Nye

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I've heard a lot of people double both but during the verses keep them center panned, then when the chorus hits, they are panned wider.

Just something I've heard a lot (and done myself a few times)
 

Kingdom of Nye

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There is one thing I ALMOST always do to combat muddy vocals, and that's a HPF cutting off frequencies below 80-100hz ish depending on the mud. I've gone higher, up to around 120. I find that those frequencies are better off removed from vocal tracks to leave space for other instruments (especially in a rock setting like you mentioned).

Doubling without cutting out unnecessary lows can get "muddy" for sure
 

yeti

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Freddy is right, never do something just because it's what you always do, unless we're talking basic good engineering practices, etc.
With regards to doubling vocals, it depends on the singer, personally I think less layers is always more powerful, not just vocals but guitars as well. If your baseline is doubletracked vocal, where do you go from there, triple-tracked?
 

sk8rat

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just to echo what they said, I like it sometimes but just like reverb, it can easily be overdone. one of my favorite techniques is when the vocals are doubled; one track chest voice and the other head voice, bearing in mind it doesn't work in every application.
0:59

that said, certain people like certain things done certain ways and there isnt anything wrong with that if you do it right. ultimately I think you have to use your creative judgement. on a lot of black sabbath songs, tony iommi double tracks his solos but they purposefully aren't totally synced, or even the same most of the time. some people really like it and some dont.
 




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