Does tru oil cure faster under the sunlight?

5F6-A

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I have finished a maple neck with 15 coats of TI. Very thin coats with a very light sand every 5 coats or so. Left the neck alone for 24 hours between coats. For the last coat I thinned the TI out a tiny bit with mineral spirits. It worked like a charm.

I left the neck for a month to cure. I tried yesterday and the finish felt nice and solid but today, my hand were a little damp and the neck felt really tacky. Is this normal. I thought a month was ample time for 15 very, very thin coats to fully cure and stay unaffected by wet/sweaty hands. Should I leave it for a bit longer in the sun?

Thanks!

BTW, this was the neck only a few days ago.

 
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5F6-A

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BTW, I was after a similar look to this Fender Custom Shop neck (not that it matters that much).

tele neck detail.JPG
 

Caretaker

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I would think the sunlight is heating the oil and that is why it is tacky.
IMO it should sit in a dry, dust free room to completely dry.
Any oil based product (vaseline, etc) goes liquid in heat.
 

5F6-A

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I would think the sunlight is heating the oil and that is why it is tacky.
IMO it should sit in a dry, dust free room to completely dry.
Any oil based product (vaseline, etc) goes liquid in heat.
So, you're suggesting the heat might delay its curing rather than accelerating it, right?
 

5F6-A

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I think I'm going to give it an extra two weeks in a ventilated cool room and see if it improves. DO you think it will help?

After that I was thinking of giving it a final coat of carnauba wax once the T-O is as hard as it will go. The idea is to make the neck "faster", if you know what I mean.

ger.PNG
 

larryguitar

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Tru-Oil isn't really an 'oil' though; it's a varnish processed to cure when exposed to oxygen, with some oils added for coloration.

I've found a fan directly at the surface can speed drying of Tru-Oil; just don't let the fan blow dust and dirt into the surface.

Larry
 

Subterfuge

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Tru-Oil is a cheap phenolic varnish, it never dries hard in my experience . I gave up on it years ago for that reason
 

moreles

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I agree with Subterfuge, though I didn't think that Tru-Oil would perform as badly as it seems to be behaving for you. For sure, warmth softens oil (and much else), but I'm surprised it's that bad. After all, playing = friction = heat, and I don't hear complaints about Tru-Oil softening in use. But I just think there are better finishes, so I avoid it. I'm sorry you are having this problem. That's a new one. And I sure wouldn't wax anything, particularly a soft finish. Wax = sux.
 

marksoundguitars

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I do all my necks in Tru-Oil, mostly going for a slick satin finish, though I've done a couple of glossy ones.

If the back of the neck feels sticky to you, lightly scuff it with a mild abrasive like 0000 steel wool or the equivalent Scotch-Brite.

Once you get it to where you like it, I'd bet you'll never be satisfied with another finish. :cool:
 

5F6-A

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As I said i am giving it some extra time and after that i will scuff the back of the neck. Will wax it if it feels hard enough but a bit too dry and 'draggy'.
 

bcguitars74

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I use different things depending on what I have to hand - Danish oil or polyx being the usual. When it comes to the neck I wet sand the oil/vanish in up to 1500 or 2000 grit. Once it's dry and buffed up a bit it's smoother than a panther's earlobe, no drag to speak of.

I would leave the wax though as I imagine when it gets warm it melts slightly and will cause the drag factor.

Caveat: I'm no expert, this is just what works for me!
 

larryguitar

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I use different things depending on what I have to hand - Danish oil or polyx being the usual. When it comes to the neck I wet sand the oil/vanish in up to 1500 or 2000 grit. Once it's dry and buffed up a bit it's smoother than a panther's earlobe, no drag to speak of.

I would leave the wax though as I imagine when it gets warm it melts slightly and will cause the drag factor.

Caveat: I'm no expert, this is just what works for me!
Agree on the wax, but Meguir's Final Shine will leave it super-duper smooth.

Larry
 

larryguitar

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As Larry says:

Tru Oil isn't oil.

Want it to dry faster? Rub it with Original ArmorAll. I have no idea why.



View attachment 465867
Looks like you've done that, Who. Have you found it to dry as fast as that linked posting said? That would really be a game changer...


Larry
 

dspelman

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Tru-Oil is a cheap phenolic varnish, it never dries hard in my experience . I gave up on it years ago for that reason
Tru-Oil is a "boiled" linseed oil. That is, it's linseed oil that's been enhanced with chemicals designed to help it dry faster.
I'd expect that the culprit here is the number of coats applied and the lack of thinning early on. I've traditionally put on initial coats of Tru-Oil that were thinned with at least three to four parts of solvent.

Linseed oil, whether boiled or not, polymerizes over time, but can leave you with a sticky mess if it doesn't.
 

5F6-A

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Tru-Oil is a "boiled" linseed oil. That is, it's linseed oil that's been enhanced with chemicals designed to help it dry faster.
I'd expect that the culprit here is the number of coats applied and the lack of thinning early on. I've traditionally put on initial coats of Tru-Oil that were thinned with at least three to four parts of solvent.

Linseed oil, whether boiled or not, polymerizes over time, but can leave you with a sticky mess if it doesn't.
So, you're saying that I have to wait for longer... right?
 


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