Does this make sense to anyone?

tinman402

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LET's KEEP THIS WITH IN THE RULES... Mods if you don't feel this belongs please feel free to delete no need to ban me I will be good promise...

Council Votes To Move Nathan Bedford Forrest's Remains | Local 24 News | News, Weather and Sports for Memphis & the Mid-South | WATN-TV | LocalMemphis.com

Let's dig up this man and his wife because he was a confederate! Is this the beginning of things to come? He has been in the ground for 138 years like he will have some bearing on the current issues..

Little history of the MAN

Lt. General Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) was a renowned Southern military leader and strategist during the War Between the States. During the Civil War, Forrest's Confederate cavalry wrecked havoc among Union forces throughout the mid-South. He gained worldwide fame from his many battlefield successes, but the wartime heroics have overshadowed his post-war work as a community leader and civil rights advocate. He fought fiercely on the battlefield, yet was a compassionate man off the field. After the war, Forrest worked tirelessly to build the New South and to promote employment for black Southerners. Forrest was known near and far as a great general, and was a well-respected citizen by both blacks and whites alike.

The Independent Order of Pole-Bearers Association (predecessor to the NAACP) was organized by Southern blacks after the war to promote black voting rights, etc. One of their early conventions was held in Memphis and Mr. Forrest was invited to be the guest speaker, the first white man ever to be invited to speak to the Association.

After the Civil War, General Forrest made a speech to the Memphis City Council (then called the Board of Aldermen). In this speech he said that there was no reason that the black man could not be doctors, store clerks, bankers, or any other job equal to whites. They were part of our community and should be involved and employed as such just like anyone else. In another speech to Federal authorities, Forrest said that many of the ex-slaves were skilled artisans and needed to be employed and that those skills needed to be taught to the younger workers. If not, then the next generation of blacks would have no skills and could not succeed and would become dependent on the welfare of society.

Forrest's words went unheeded. The Memphis & Selma Railroad was organized by Forrest after the war to help rebuild the South's transportation and to build the 'new South'. Forrest took it upon himself to hire blacks as architects, construction engineers and foremen, train engineers and conductors, and other high level jobs. In the North, blacks were prohibited from holding such jobs. When the Civil War began, Forrest offered freedom to 44 of his slaves if they would serve with him in the Confederate army. All 44 agreed. One later deserted; the other 43 served faithfully until the end of the war.

Though they had many chances to leave, they chose to remain loyal to the South and to Forrest. Part of General Forrest's command included his own Escort Company, his Green Berets, made up of the very best soldiers available. This unit, which varied in size from 40-90 men, was the elite of the cavalry. Eight of these picked men were black soldiers and all served gallantly and bravely throughout the war. All were armed with at least 2 pistols and a rifle; most also carried two additional pistols in saddle holsters. At war's end, when Forrest's cavalry surrendered in May 1865, there were 65 black troopers on the muster roll. Of the soldiers who served under him, Forrest said of the black troops: Finer Confederates never fought.

Forrest was a brilliant cavalryman and courageous soldier. As author Jack Hurst writes: a man possessed of physical valor perhaps unprecedented among his countrymen, as well as, ironically, a man whose social attitudes may well have changed farther in the direction of racial enlightenment over the span of his lifetime than those of most American historical figures.

When Forrest died in 1877 it is noteworthy that his funeral in Memphis was attended not only by a throng of thousands of whites but by hundreds of blacks as well. The funeral procession was over two miles long and was attended by over 10,000 area residents, including 3000 black citizens paying their respects.


Source: Tennessee-scv.org/Forrest Historical Societ
**** not that I would do this but an example of the double standard****

I have a grave yard behind my house that is 200 years old.. If I dug up the black minister and his family buried there since 1860 because I no longer feel they belong there what would happen? I would be crucified by everyone for it..

Sorry the logic applied these days just baffles me.. This is an issue that is becoming stronger everyday..

There is a smoking rumor that the University of tn is prepared to build a satellite school in Memphis and this is the land they want to put the grant tword..
 

DRF

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"Is this the beginning of things to come?". Yes, things are going get much, much worse. That's why you have to have a firm hand, give an inch and they will drag your body for a mile behind the wagon.
 

WaywerdSon

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I wonder what construction company "owned" by the Ford family will get the contracts for the new project? (I am somewhat familiar with Memphis city politics)
 

cybermgk

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I wonder what construction company "owned" by the Ford family will get the contracts for the new project? (I am somewhat familiar with Memphis city politics)
Yea, this has the stink of money and grift, under the 'flag' (pun intended) of PC bandwagonning as a smokescreen. "Hey everyone, ignore the man behind the curtain making a ton of money, and focus on big bad confederate. Boo the confederate (and ignore the actual person he was). "
 

E1WOOD5150

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I live in the South. The Capitol of the Confederacy, as a matter of fact. Bred here, born here, and plan on being buried here. Everything and everyone I've ever known and loved is here. This mess has to stop. I don't care if you are African-American, Latino, Caucasian, Asian, Hindi, Muslim, Jewish, black, white, blind, crippled or crazy...if you treat me with respect, I will treat you with respect. If you do not respect me or my family, I will not respect you or yours. Simple as that.

If we do not acknowledge the mistakes of those that came before us, we are doomed to repeat them.

I could go on for hours about this. Some might agree with me, some may think I am off my rocker, but I know that myself, and those I associate with daily, both through my business contacts, and my personal life, do not feel the same as those promoting the elimination of all things related to the South and its heritage. To allow Teen Mom 2, Keeping up with the Kardashians, The Bachelorette, Naked Dating and so many other so called "reality" shows that promote teenage pregnancy, promiscuity and general attention whoring, while raising a ruckus over a show that's been off the air for over 25 years because of a car that has a Confederate Battle flag on the roof and is named after a Confederate General on a show that promoted family values over governmental ineptitude and corruption, is part of the problem, and ludicrous.
 

MikeyTheCat

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Some people are just ignorant and would rather just respond in a knee jerk fashion to be in step with a current fad.
General Nathan Bedford Forrest Versus the Ku Klux Klan | John A. Tures

NBF's farewell to his troops.
By an agreement made between Liet.-Gen. Taylor, commanding the Department of Alabama. Mississippi, and East Louisiana, and Major-Gen. Canby, commanding United States forces, the troops of this department have been surrendered.

I do not think it proper or necessary at this time to refer to causes which have reduced us to this extremity; nor is it now a matter of material consequence to us how such results were brought about. That we are BEATEN is a self-evident fact, and any further resistance on our part would justly be regarded as the very height of folly and rashness.

The armies of Generals LEE and JOHNSON having surrendered. you are the last of all the troops of the Confederate States Army east of the Mississippi River to lay down your arms.

The Cause for which you have so long and so manfully struggled, and for which you have braved dangers, endured privations, and sufferings, and made so many sacrifices, is today hopeless. The government which we sought to establish and perpetuate, is at an end. Reason dictates and humanity demands that no more blood be shed. Fully realizing and feeling that such is the case, it is your duty and mine to lay down our arms -- submit to the “powers that be” -- and to aid in restoring peace and establishing law and order throughout the land.

The terms upon which you were surrendered are favorable, and should be satisfactory and acceptable to all. They manifest a spirit of magnanimity and liberality, on the part of the Federal authorities, which should be met, on our part, by a faithful compliance with all the stipulations and conditions therein expressed. As your Commander, I sincerely hope that every officer and soldier of my command will cheerfully obey the orders given, and carry out in good faith all the terms of the cartel.

Those who neglect the terms and refuse to be paroled, may assuredly expect, when arrested, to be sent North and imprisoned. Let those who are absent from their commands, from whatever cause, report at once to this place, or to Jackson, Miss.; or, if too remote from either, to the nearest United States post or garrison, for parole.

Civil war, such as you have just passed through naturally engenders feelings of animosity, hatred, and revenge. It is our duty to divest ourselves of all such feelings; and as far as it is in our power to do so, to cultivate friendly feelings towards those with whom we have so long contended, and heretofore so widely, but honestly, differed. Neighborhood feuds, personal animosities, and private differences should be blotted out; and, when you return home, a manly, straightforward course of conduct will secure the respect of your enemies. Whatever your responsibilities may be to Government, to society, or to individuals meet them like men.

The attempt made to establish a separate and independent Confederation has failed; but the consciousness of having done your duty faithfully, and to the end, will, in some measure, repay for the hardships you have undergone.

In bidding you farewell, rest assured that you carry with you my best wishes for your future welfare and happiness. Without, in any way, referring to the merits of the Cause in which we have been engaged, your courage and determination, as exhibited on many hard-fought fields, has elicited the respect and admiration of friend and foe. And I now cheerfully and gratefully acknowledge my indebtedness to the officers and men of my command whose zeal, fidelity and unflinching bravery have been the great source of my past success in arms.

I have never, on the field of battle, sent you where I was unwilling to go myself; nor would I now advise you to a course which I felt myself unwilling to pursue. You have been good soldiers, you can be good citizens. Obey the laws, preserve your honor, and the Government to which you have surrendered can afford to be, and will be, magnanimous.

N.B. Forrest, Lieut.-General

Headquarters, Forrest's Cavalry Corps

Gainesville, Alabama

May 9, 1865
Nathan Bedford Forrest

And the famous speech that should be erected by his grave, it might educate a few folks.
Miss Lou Lewis, daughter of a Pole Bearer member, was introduced to Forrest and she presented the former general a bouquet of flowers as a token of reconciliation, peace and good will. On July 5, 1875, Nathan Bedford Forrest delivered this speech:

"Ladies and Gentlemen, I accept the flowers as a memento of reconciliation between the white and colored races of the Southern states. I accept it more particularly as it comes from a colored lady, for if there is any one on God's earth who loves the ladies I believe it is myself. (Immense applause and laughter.) I came here with the jeers of some white people, who think that I am doing wrong. I believe I can exert some influence, and do much to assist the people in strengthening fraternal relations, and shall do all in my power to elevate every man, to depress none.

(Applause.)

I want to elevate you to take positions in law offices, in stores, on farms, and wherever you are capable of going. I have not said anything about politics today. I don't propose to say anything about politics. You have a right to elect whom you please; vote for the man you think best, and I think, when that is done, you and I are freemen. Do as you consider right and honest in electing men for office. I did not come here to make you a long speech, although invited to do so by you. I am not much of a speaker, and my business prevented me from preparing myself. I came to meet you as friends, and welcome you to the white people. I want you to come nearer to us. When I can serve you I will do so. We have but one flag, one country; let us stand together. We may differ in color, but not in sentiment. Many things have been said about me which are wrong, and which white and black persons here, who stood by me through the war, can contradict. Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed I'll come to your relief. I thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for this opportunity you have afforded me to be with you, and to assure you that I am with you in heart and in hand." (Prolonged applause.)

End of speech.1

Nathan Bedford Forrest again thanked Miss Lewis for the bouquet and then gave her a kiss on the cheek. Such a kiss was unheard of in the society of those days, in 1875, but it showed a token of respect and friendship between the general and the black community and did much to promote harmony among the citizens of Memphis.
 

Bytor1958

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The Politically Correct world has gotten out of hand and reality TV is not reality. This has gotten old real fast.
 

MikeyTheCat

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peach64

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So there is a push to take down the confederate flag, to replace it with???the rainbow flag? Soon the White House will be a Rainbow...what a joke
 

splatter

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its not about hate,racism,or being offended . Its about control.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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the more you tell some people not to do something the more they'll do it.

I know people who want that flag now just because they're being told they can't have it.

"it's all about control" is 100% right
 

Tone deaf

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It's about hate and lust for power on the part of the politically correct. It is an affront to the Constitution and to this once great nation. I hope to live long enough to see its greatness restored.
 

InsertUsernameHere

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Isn't it strange in a time where so much can be done to unify the people, we choose to be polarized over non-issues? We're a generation of ineffectual pussies. Protest corruption all you want, no one is listening. Will they listen when bullets start cracking off? Well, they'll be forced to. Damn, ain't it great to be an American in this day and age?
 

Bytor1958

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It's turned into a generation of the entitled.... Just sayin.... I never thought I'd see the day when this country is going down hill and fast ... WTF happened here............ I was brought up that you worked and worked hard to get what you wanted. Nothing is given to you.... The Hope and Change isn't what they hoped for.
 

MikeyTheCat

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the more you tell some people not to do something the more they'll do it.

I know people who want that flag now just because they're being told they can't have it.

"it's all about control" is 100% right
Maybe it can be used as a Rebel flag? You know, for the kind of people who don't want to just conform because all the cool kids are doing it.
 

cmerch

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I agree with not flying the VA battle flag on state grounds, but this is way over the top.
 

Beaver Creek

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I can't for the life of me figure out which way all this tolerance "they" have been preaching is supposed to work...

Lee
 


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