Do you ever cut your nuts like this?

jonnyglock9

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Pardon the cheeky title :p

I have been doing some research on Les Paul nuts, trying to address tuning stability issues on an R8. It is perfectly intonated, set-up like a dream, but doesn't stay in tune for more than 5 minutes.

I came across Gerry's work at Haze Guitars. I am wondering if any of you ever cut the nut channels at an angle, like the 2nd and 3rd (particularly the 3rd...) image in this diagram. Does this work to permanently fix Les Paul tuning issues? Is there anyway to buy a pre-notched nut with these angles started?

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ARandall

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The fulcrum has to occur at some point. Slotted at a downwards angle the fulcrum is on the fretboard end. Slotted flat its on the tuner end.
Certainly on the down angle (and especially if that angle is more than the angle to the tuner) then you will have the string only touching the side(s) where it exits on an angle. That might just make the difference for the troublesome D and G strings which seem to be the biggest culprits of tuning instability.
Its always good to have some lube in the slots too, no matter how well the nut has been finessed.
 

charlie chitlins

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If it doesn't stay in tune, it's not set up ;like a dream.
I've had/seen guitars with the nut cut like that...it doesn't seem to hurt anything.
Millions of guitars stay in tune every day with nuts cut the traditional way.
 

marksoundguitars

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That's how a LP nut should be cut.

The string should contact the nut on the fretboard side, and the slot should slope down on the tuner side. The slots on the 3 and 4 should angle toward the tuner.

If it's done properly there won't be any issues.
 

jonnyglock9

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Thanks guys!

The fulcrum has to occur at some point. Slotted at a downwards angle the fulcrum is on the fretboard end. Slotted flat its on the tuner end.
Certainly on the down angle (and especially if that angle is more than the angle to the tuner) then you will have the string only touching the side(s) where it exits on an angle. That might just make the difference for the troublesome D and G strings which seem to be the biggest culprits of tuning instability.
Its always good to have some lube in the slots too, no matter how well the nut has been finessed.

Interesting, I hadn't thought of it like that! Makes perfect sense. Also, I bought some graphite sticks a while back, may even have a tube of nut sauce that someone gave me somewhere, come to think of it. Def will try that!

Do you think I would have to cut a new nut, or could I use a nut file to achieve the desired downward slope (obviously would need a new nut for img 3).

That's how a LP nut should be cut.

The string should contact the nut on the fretboard side, and the slot should slope down on the tuner side. The slots on the 3 and 4 should angle toward the tuner.

If it's done properly there won't be any issues.

Would I need to buy a blank nut, or are there any out there that are notched in this manner?

Also, I am not entirely sure if I have string/nut binding going on... is that where it's just basically getting wedged into the wall of the nut?

I bought this guitar from the original owner, who told me it had a custom bone nut made and was set up recently. He even has the luthier's receipt in the case, along with the original nut, among all the candy/hang tags.

Still not quite sure of my best first move here.

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ARandall

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On an existing nut it is certainly possible to add in a downward slope. When cutting a nut I try to aim the file at the hole in the tuner height wise. I also will wrap above the hole.....so maybe tweak for where you intend the string to go after the nut and make sure the slot is angled at least slightly below..

Also make sure you don't hit the front end of the slot. You want that angle to be crisp without any gradual rolloff which will cause a slight buzzing or damping of the tone.
 

emoney

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A quick way to know if this is where your problem lies is to simply switch out the nut to the factory that he included. If your guitar stays in tune then you know it’s a nut issue. If not then you can look closer at the tuners themselves. Btw, did the included factory nut have the angles cut in it?
 

Roxy13

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I bring the strings in straight on the fretboard side and then angle the fallaway toward the tuners. I do it on all my guitars that have the Gibson style headstock and they stay in tune very well then with no binding.
 

mikehoneyblonde

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The fulcrum has to occur at some point. Slotted at a downwards angle the fulcrum is on the fretboard end. Slotted flat its on the tuner end.
Certainly on the down angle (and especially if that angle is more than the angle to the tuner) then you will have the string only touching the side(s) where it exits on an angle. That might just make the difference for the troublesome D and G strings which seem to be the biggest culprits of tuning instability.
Its always good to have some lube in the slots too, no matter how well the nut has been finessed.
A properly made/serviced nut does not need lube. My tremolo guitars stay in tune with no lube.
 

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