Differences between LPJ 2013 and Studio 2006

daniloantunes

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Hi!

Up to now, I believe the LPJ is a Studio 2006 with another name. In these specific models until the finish (poorly done) is identical. The only differences I know are: The LPJ has maple neck (stronger and brighter?) And the Studio has the pick guard.

There are other differences? If so, what would be the best choice?

It will be my first Gibson and do not want to make a wrong choice!

I found a new Gibson LPJ Worn Brown 2013 and a Gibson Studio Faded 2006 used (but in excellent condition) at the same price.

(I know there are several comparisons between LPJ and the Studio in this forum, but I've researched similar questions and found no one with the Studio 2006, that had the classical weight relief system and some aspects that are very similar to the LPJ)
 

acstorfer

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By Studio Faded are you talking about a Vintage Mahagony Studio? If that's the case, I had a Vintage Mahogany. It was a good guitar. It was very light, my assumption was that it was chambered. It came loaded with Burstbucker Pros. There should be a hardshell case with it.

The new LPJ's definitely remind me of the Vintage Mahagony Studios, but I never played one to compare it to.
 

vivanchenko

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I would stay away from maple necks, they are too bright for my taste, but it is just me. Some love them. As far as I know most modern Studios come with maple necks too - a sure sign that it becomes harder to source mahogany. Pre 2010 guitars generally were made of better wood that is when problems sourcing it were not so obvious. There are exceptions, of cause, to this general rule. For instance, most, if not all, 91-95 Studios have maple necks too (for a different reason - they used necks which for quality reasons didn't make it into maple neck Customs and rather than to through them away they used them for Studios). Starting from 95-96 its back to mahogany again. Many people who refinished early 90s Studios where surprised to find a maple neck under stripped off finish even though it was an official feature back then.
 

BenK

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The maple neck on my 2014 LPJ is rather nice, but agreeably it is brighter than a mahogany neck. Seems to be snappy, not harsh sounding to my ear. At least not that changing other appointments to compensate for the added brightness would be effective in taming it (ie- different pickups, string type/gauges, different wiring)
 

phodg

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I have a desert burst 2013 LPJ Pro (maple top, 490R/490T pickups and coil tapping). It's awesome.
 

Juan Wayne

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White 2013 LPJ here, amazing guitar, great bang for the buck. Yes, it's snappier than more traditional mahogany neck models, but once I got rid of the pickup covers and set it up nicely, it cuts through the mix like an axe through butter, without being harsh at all. I can't remember trying the studio, but since they're mostly the same guitar, focus on the differences and see if one of them makes the difference.

And of course, if you can, try them both!
 

Biddlin

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"Snappier?" Only if you break it across your knee!How the hell can you hear maple through magnetic pickups? Nonsense.
;>)/
 

Rick

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"Snappier?" Only if you break it across your knee!How the hell can you hear maple through magnetic pickups? Nonsense.
;>)/

"Snappy" is most assuredly a playing style - not a description of tone.
 

Preacher403

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I'd go with the Studio just because the pickups are a lot better. Even if you plan on replacing them, you'd get much more money for whatever it has than the crap version of the 490/498s that the '13 LPJ came with.
 

Juan Wayne

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I'd go with the Studio just because the pickups are a lot better. Even if you plan on replacing them, you'd get much more money for whatever it has than the crap version of the 490/498s that the '13 LPJ came with.

Actually they sound awesome. Only drawback is the pole pieces are not adjustable, but I see your point. Traditional 490/498's will probably be more valuable if you wanna sell them sometime. I just liked them so selling them is not a concern.

"Snappier?" Only if you break it across your knee!How the hell can you hear maple through magnetic pickups? Nonsense.
;>)/

Please tell me you're just trolling or making fun of Scott Grove disciples.

I'm too tired (and not getting payed for here) to write an essay on stationary wave systems over non fixed points, 3-dimensional interference, wave propagation on dampened resonant systems (or whatever the translation from my language is), kinetic energy dissipation and absortion on solids, electromagnetism and all that other physics crap that anti-tone-wood people leave out of the multi-grade diferential equations involved in what we end up hearing.

Edit: on a second read I think you were just kidding and I must be on my dude period about that stupid debate, I'm sorry.
 

Biddlin

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Actually they sound awesome. Only drawback is the pole pieces are not adjustable, but I see your point. Traditional 490/498's will probably be more valuable if you wanna sell them sometime. I just liked them so selling them is not a concern.



Please tell me you're just trolling or making fun of Scott Grove disciples.

I'm too tired (and not getting payed for here) to write an essay on stationary wave systems over non fixed points, 3-dimensional interference, wave propagation on dampened resonant systems (or whatever the translation from my language is), kinetic energy dissipation and absortion on solids, electromagnetism and all that other physics crap that anti-tone-wood people leave out of the multi-grade diferential equations involved in what we end up hearing.

Edit: on a second read I think you were just kidding and I must be on my dude period about that stupid debate, I'm sorry.
I am not anti-tonewood people. Love to see your notes on these matters, when you're less inflamed and engorged. I long to be shown any evidence that wood affects the signal to the amp.
;>)/
 

vivanchenko

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I am not anti-tonewood people. Love to see your notes on these matters, when you're less inflamed and engorged. I long to be shown any evidence that wood affects the signal to the amp.
;>)/

No, not this sh..t again!!! Experiment, think, come back again.
 

vivanchenko

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My advice - never buy a guitar because of pickups. Their influence on tone is relatively minor and most importantly they can easily be swapped out. Poor workmanship and setup can also be fixed most of the times, but there is nothing, absolutely nothing, you can do about a lousy chunk of wood. Wood and guitar construction (sb, hb, chb, neck thickness, body thickness, etc) shape a crucial part of your tone unless you are not a metalhead, and even then it would, and if you are not happy with it there is only one thing you can do - sell your guitar and invest into another one. I also noticed that thicker body/neck guitars are a lot less likely to have the dead note problems, in fact they are almost free of it while a thin body/neck guitar is almost granted to have them. Though I have seen a few exceptions.
 

jstarr

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...never buy a guitar because of pickups. Their influence on tone is relatively minor...

...there is nothing, absolutely nothing, you can do about a lousy chunk of wood. Wood and guitar construction (sb, hb, chb, neck thickness, body thickness, etc) shape a crucial part of your tone...

This is a joke... Right?
 

vivanchenko

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Trying to evaluate the influence of wood on tone using YouTube is like trying to conceive a baby with three layers of rubber on your willy. Play otherwise identical or near identical guitars made of different wood and you will see the light. I did it many times personally and no stupid YouTube video will convince me that my personal experience was wrong.

All Epi owners know that their guitars will not sound like a Gibson even if they have Gibson pickups and hardware. I could go as far as to say that an Epi can sound better than a Gibson but it will always sound distinctly different in a very specific way and the difference can be consistently reproduced no mater how many guitars your compare.

Realizing that the idea of what sounds good is highly subjective I also understand that the general consensus on good and bad tone is that good tone is what most people consider to be pleasing and vice versa. One reference of this is classic sounds produced by iconic musicians which are obviously liked buy large amounts of people. Want to play those classic sounds? Use the same, or as close as possible, classic tone wood.

I don't know why am I trying to convince anyone that wood matters? The more people think that it doesn't the easier it is going to be for guitar maniacs like me to get access to good wood.
 

Rick

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Trying to evaluate the influence of wood on tone using YouTube is like trying to conceive a baby with three layers of rubber on your willy. Play otherwise identical or near identical guitars made of different wood and you will see the light. I did it many times personally and no stupid YouTube video will convince me that my personal experience was wrong.

All Epi owners know that their guitars will not sound like a Gibson even if they have Gibson pickups and hardware. I could go as far as to say that an Epi can sound better than a Gibson but it will always sound distinctly different in a very specific way and the difference can be consistently reproduced no mater how many guitars your compare.

Realizing that the idea of what sounds good is highly subjective I also understand that the general consensus on good and bad tone is that good tone is what most people consider to be pleasing and vice versa. One reference of this is classic sounds produced by iconic musicians which are obviously liked buy large amounts of people. Want to play those classic sounds? Use the same, or as close as possible, classic tone wood.

I don't know why am I trying to convince anyone that wood matters? The more people think that it doesn't the easier it is going to be for guitar maniacs like me to get access to good wood.

"Otherwise near identical guitars" are not identical and never will be. No two pickups will ever be wound exactly the same and pot values are not identical. They are standardized within a certain range even if they are marked "250" "500" etc. Your personal experience is a poor judgement of anything. That's not a personal attack on you that's just how it is. People personally experience lots of things, but that doesn't make them true.

You can convince yourself wood matters all you want, but in the end pickups are magnetic and they only care about the strings.

Now, I like my guitar to be built from good wood. It looks nicer, rings better unplugged, and generally a guitar with expensive wood is going to be built better. But I'm not so gullible as to believe that guitars transcend the laws of physics and a magnetic pickup somehow can tell what kind of wood it's attached to.

Wood matters to your electric guitar, it just doesn't affect it's tone. The tone first and foremost comes from your fingers. The way a guitar feels and your perception of it (hey this guitar has a maple neck I better play it all snappy like a Tele) even if subconscious will affect your tone because it affects the way you play the guitar. The pickups and amp then color the tone of your fingers.
 

vivanchenko

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Then have your guitars made of other wood such as walnut, cherry, ceder and I could go on and on and on naming woods compared to which Swietenia Macrophylla looks like a piece of sh...t. Honestly. Take all that beautiful wood and just leave the ugly Swietenia Macrophylla to me. That and some plane red maple.

On a side note I should say that your understanding of guitar as a system is absurd.
 

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