Cupcake? Heresy? Pony? 4 stacks of plexi?

NorlinBlackBeauty

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@Gtarzan81 @Rando375

My honest take on Yuengling Traditional Lager thus far. Halfway though the 24 ounce can poured in my standard glass. Allowing it to slowly warm to bring out other flavors not out front when below 38°F.

...

I have just spent more than an hour making observations. Beer nearly gone.

Color: more amber that I recall thanks to the caramel malt. Lets you know it is not a mega straw colored American Standard Lager. Crystal clear. The best part of the experience.

Conditioning: how well it stood up after being poured. Not as carbonated as typical mega lagers - a plus for me. Needs to be bullied into forming a head that does not last long. Medium bubbles. Little to no "lacework" - beer geek speak for the fine foam residue that coats the glass as you take successive sips. Most that developed was after the aggressive pour. Tiny bubbles and lacework are a decent indicator of a well conditioned and packaged beer. Easy to pull off in a hoppy IPA. Challenging for a more neutral lager.

Aroma: not much to speak of. Bland. A minuscule amount of hop with a faint malt-like character. The hop varieties used are citrus-like - I detect none of that.

Flavor: Thin bodied which is to be expected of an adjunct lager weighing in at 4.5% ABV. The best part is the caramel also known as crystal malt which is the main flavor. Caramel malt adds body and sweetness, but provides little in the way of fermentable sugars. There are at least a few color / darkness ranges for caramel malt measured in Lovibond. I'll guess this was the lighter variety. The base pale six-row malt does not come through much if at all. Hop flavor is hard to pick out. No citrus as you should expect. It is surprisingly OK when it rises above 50°F. Most mega lagers are rather awful by then - another plus for Yuengling.

Bitterness / finish: The least pleasant part of the experience. A mild non-descript hop bite. Just enough to provide a small bite to attempt to counter sweetness. The pleasant caramel malt is gone, and you are left with a generic cereal-like sort of grainy flavor.

Al in all a decent beer really. Surely better than the mega piss yellow mega brews. I'd consider it a beer out of balance though as the hops should be a bit more assertive to balance the caramel sweetness.

Caramel malt is tasty stuff. You should try it in it's crushed grain form before it ends up in the brew kettle. Very crunchy! I used to put it on my cereal when I still ate milk and cereal.

If I was out and about and this was available for free like a party or something, I'd have at it. I would not pay for it though.
 
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NorlinBlackBeauty

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Oh, the Bitbuger take on American mega brews ... https://www.bitburger.com/brewery-tradition/sierra-nevada-goes-bitburg/

Compared to the Yuengling this was more like a less hopped up German Pilsner to me. German Pilsners tend to be on the crisp bitter side. The US NW hops were somehow not in your face citrus. Maybe the German grown Cascade has less of that. :dunno:

Without getting too wordy, this was a well conditioned nicely balanced golden malty beer. Flavors right where you'd expect them to be. Rather hazy - I'll guess it may have been unfiltered. Imported German Lagers are typically crystal clear.
 
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Gtarzan81

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Remember! If someone does not agree 100% with your political opinions, they are a terrible person and need to be disowned immediately. ;)
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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Remember! If someone does not agree 100% with your political opinions, they are a terrible person and need to be disowned immediately. ;)
Ruh roh ...

BTW I told the guys at the beer place all about (greatly condensed) your lust for Yuengling and my quest for research. Got a chuckle or two. They know me well enough.
 

Gtarzan81

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His Frankenstrat was a mix of Les Paul and Fender. He loved the Gibson sound, Franky used PAFs (he killed more than a few in experiments).


If you find a higher-res version of this pic, you would see where he put a Gibson sticker on the headstock of his Boogie Body “Strat”, to show how this was part Gibson.

And the Duncan 78 is basically a hot wound 59 with an A2 magnet.
 


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