Could the Norwegians have been the first to mass produce a solidbody electric guitar?

coldsteal2

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Cool, you learn something new every day!

I notice that it was made in Fredrickstad Norway,
thats where my x-wife was born, her father was a woodworker
be funny if i found out he worked there.
 

zontar

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Cool, you learn something new every day!

I notice that it was made in Fredrickstad Norway,
thats where my x-wife was born, her father was a woodworker
be funny if i found out he worked there.
That would be, yes.
 

coldsteal2

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I can imagine the woodwork on the guitars
is excelent
 

Daniel

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No Way, too cold there for that kind of innovation...

Brains are all frozen and even when you thaw them out the resulting bubbles inhibit logical thinking.
 

TeleDog

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This will never, ever end! It's like every time I'm settled on what came first, there's a new one....

First I thought it was the Tele, then the Frying Pan, then then the Songster, now this.... Pretty soon we'll hear about how a T-Rex was experimenting with pickups and then... :D
 

msfenderarg

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From the blog:..

dre
The seller describes this guitar thus: "This guitar is from 1945-1950." That's stretching the truth a little. Kinda like saying my '81 Strat is "from 1939-1981". Nilsen got a Norwegian patent for something related to this guitar in 1949, but the linked website states "Regulær produksjon startet i løpet av sommeren 1950." That's easy to read, and it says that regular production was started in the summer of 1950, several months after Fender started producing the Esquire. That means the Nilsengitar is NOT the first mass produced solidbody electric. Regardless, that's a really cool axe produced at the very first moments of the solidbody electric era. That's enough to warrant more praise for Nilsen, I think.
 

Grey

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The Rickenbacker 'Frying Pan' guitar was concieved in 1931 and went into production in 1932, it still predates this example by nearly a decade even at the earliest estimate.

To quote:

These instruments constitute the origin of the electric guitar we know and use today by virtue of their string-driven electro-magnetic pick-ups. Not only that, but Ro-Pat-In was the first company in the world specifically created to manufacture electric instruments. In 1933 the Ro-Pat-In company's name was changed to Electro String Instrument Corporation and its instruments labeled simply as "Electro". In 1934 the name of Rickenbacher" was added in honor of the company's principal partner.
 

Kølabrennern

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Gotta hand it to him, that transition from the neck to the body looks way more comfortable than anything Fender or Gibson had at the time. :)

The patent was named something as rock n' roll as: Contraption for electro-acoustic musical instruments. Nilsen himself didn't actually design the guitar, but stood behind the development of the pickup system and other things relating to the electronics, whereas model builder and violin/mandolin maker Johan Albert Johansen stood behind most of the design and woodwork for the actual guitar. It says on the page that they are to believe the first prototype was finished in 1947, but who knows.
 

Cygnus X1

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The Rickenbacker 'Frying Pan' guitar was concieved in 1931 and went into production in 1932, it still predates this example by nearly a decade even at the earliest estimate.

To quote:
My first thought, but the Rick was not a solidbody.
 

Rich

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I wonder if it's made from Norwegian Wood...

(Okay, that was pretty pathetic, but they can't all be winners!)
 

zep

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no. norwegians are too stupid, it was probably a swede!
 

zontar

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Kølabrennern;2569796 said:
Gotta hand it to him, that transition from the neck to the body looks way more comfortable than anything Fender or Gibson had at the time. :)

The patent was named something as rock n' roll as: Contraption for electro-acoustic musical instruments. Nilsen himself didn't actually design the guitar, but stood behind the development of the pickup system and other things relating to the electronics, whereas model builder and violin/mandolin maker Johan Albert Johansen stood behind most of the design and woodwork for the actual guitar. It says on the page that they are to believe the first prototype was finished in 1947, but who knows.
Thanks for the info--I knew there had to be somebody here who could read that page.

In any case--whatever the timing, it's a cool story.
 


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