colouring fretboard fr. Rsw to ebony?

ZagKalidor

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Hello there,

question for maybe Roman Rist (Worlds No.1 Luthier):

is there a way to colour a (i think it's an) Indian Rosewood fretboard to an ebony one? My thought was that it could be done maybe by some sort of oiling?

Got the Epi standard ebony and want to customize a lil bit.

Maybe you'll find it blasphemyc or stupid but you wrote once (Roman Rist) that you never quote your customers wishes. In that case I really want you to quote this wish, because i don't wanna do something stupid to the baby.

Greetings from the middle of Germany my friends.

Rock on dudes...

Zag
 

Claymore

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I have used this with excellent results, dries perfectly black, does not bleed after, even when applying fretboard oil
 

H.E.L.Shane

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2nd the leather dye.

it WILL look different than ebony for people that know what they are looking at because of the grain structure in the rosewood.. but it will be BLACK...
 

SlashAppetite

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2nd the leather dye.

it WILL look different than ebony for people that know what they are looking at because of the grain structure in the rosewood.. but it will be BLACK...
How did you apply it? Will it just wipe off of the inlays or should i go round the inlays? Thanks :slash:
 

TKOjams

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How did you apply it? Will it just wipe off of the inlays or should i go round the inlays? Thanks :slash:
Pre Stew Mc.: Clean the wood with naphtha and sand with 600-grit before staining. Mask off neck bindings, the nut, and any other areas you don't want to stain. Apply with a clean cloth or a brush,
 

ZagKalidor

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Thank you so much for your replies friends.

About the leather dye, I read the following user review and that makes me worry a bit

User rewiew:
[This dye does what it says, makes wood a very deep black, but doesn't dry completely. I used it on a fingerboard and had the stain transfer to my fingers weeks after it was applied. Thinking maybe I just applied it too thick, I used it later on an open-back banjo pot and the same thing happened, only this time transferring to my clothes. This was especially frustrating because I'd diluted it with alcohol, per the manufacturers recommendations (two parts alcohol, one part dye) and used a much thinner coat.]

This is what I meant with "doin something stupid to the baby". I would be very bothered with black hands and clothes.

The other question would be: is it a comparable black to the epi's LP standard black?

Could someone post a few pics here? Thanks in advance for that friends.

Zag
 

Sleator

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Someone had excellent results with this if I recall.. :hmm:

 

saxman10

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There is a difference between the stewmac dye, and the other dye thats posted in this thread. Despite bein the same brand, one is a leather dye.
Using a bottle of black leather dye from my days as a leathercrafter, it worked nicely on my old flying v fretboard. (but it kinda gunks up around the metal frets)
Im sure it will wear off one day, also.....dont get it on the binding. Unless you plan on re-scraping it, or ....are a skilled master at acetone.
 


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